Skip to Content

Join the 'Anxiety and Stress' group to help and get support from people like you.

Anxiety and Stress News

Related terms: Acute Stress Reaction

Most U.S. Parents Can't Find Good Childcare: Survey

Posted 20 hours ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 20, 2017 – Two-thirds of U.S. parents with young children say it's difficult to find a childcare or preschool facility that meets their health and safety standards, new survey results show. Researchers questioned more than 300 parents nationwide who had at least one child aged 1 to 5 years. Sixty-two percent said they had trouble finding facilities that met all of their standards, according to the University of Michigan's C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health. In addition, only about half felt very confident that they could determine if a facility was safe and healthy. The poll also found that nine in 10 parents think childcare centers and in-home childcare providers should have the same health and safety standards. "Parents want to feel confident that all childcare and preschool options meet certain standards," poll co-director Sarah Clark said ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Family Vacations That Are Fun for All

Posted 21 hours ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 20, 2017 – Taking a family vacation is a great way to have quality time, but going on a trip that each family member will enjoy takes some planning. Consider choices for an activity-oriented trip. Besides health benefits, vacations make great memories when everyone participates. Start by getting the whole family involved. Show photos of possible destinations to younger kids and let older ones offer their opinions on where to go. For a beach holiday, look for a resort that also offers options such as tennis lessons, fishing trips and water activities like kayaking. For a skiing adventure, look for one with lots of winter activities, from sledding to ice skating, so that you have different options each day. City destinations can involve trips to parks and the zoo, as well as the museums and historic sites that might top Mom's and Dad's list of things to do. If you're looking ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress

Health Tip: A Pet May Improve Your Health

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Getting a pet can improve not only your emotional outlook but your physical health as well, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says. The CDC says furry companions have been shown to trigger these health improvements: Decreased blood pressure. Decreased cholesterol. Decreased triglycerides. Reduced feelings of loneliness. Greater exposure to social activities and interaction. Increased likelihood of regular exercise. Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Spare the Rod, Spur Better Behavior?

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 16, 2017 – Before you let your parental frustration get the better of you, a new study suggests you should refrain from spanking your misbehaving youngster. Researchers analyzed data from more than 12,000 children in the United States and found that those who had been spanked by their parents at age 5 had more behavior problems at ages 6 and 8 than those who had never been spanked. "Our findings suggest that spanking is not an effective technique and actually makes children's behavior worse, not better," said study author Elizabeth Gershoff, a psychological scientist at the University of Texas at Austin. The increase in behavior problems among children who were spanked could not be explained by child or parent characteristics, or the home environment, according to the study published Nov. 16 in the journal Psychological Science. "Parents spank for many reasons, such as ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Agitation, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Trauma Greets Many Illegal Immigrants in U.S.

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 15, 2017 – The American dream is nightmarish for many illegal immigrants. More than three-quarters living in a city near the California-Mexico border have suffered a traumatic event, a new study reveals. The result: Many are living with significant psychological distress, say researchers from Rice University in Houston. "Our findings are alarming," said study lead author Luz Garcini, a postdoctoral research fellow in the department of psychology. Interviews with nearly 250 illegal Mexican immigrants found that 82 percent had suffered some sort of trauma. For example, a high number had been victims of violent attacks, witnessed violence or lived in poverty. About one-third had experienced at least six or more types of traumatic events, according to the study. "The prevalence of traumatic events among undocumented immigrants in our study is much higher compared with ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress

Health Tip: Stress Can Impact Sleep

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Too much stress may make it difficult to fall asleep or stay that way. The National Sleep Foundation says your body may be offering clues that there's too much stress in your life. Among them: Your mind continues to race after your head hits the pillow. You have muscle tension and pain. Your heart races. If insomnia is chronic, it may increase your chances of developing stress-related headaches. The foundation suggests developing a relaxing pre-sleep ritual. Examples include drinking a calming tea, taking a warm bath or practicing breathing exercises or yoga. Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue

With Stress and Trauma Come Excess Weight

Posted 7 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 14, 2017 – As if weathering a stressful event isn't tough enough, new research shows these episodes might even widen a woman's waistline. Researchers analyzed data on nearly 22,000 middle-aged and older women. The goal: to assess the relationship between obesity and traumatic events – such as the death of a child or being a victim of a serious physical attack – as well as negative events, for example, long-term unemployment or burglary. About 23 percent of the women included in the study were obese. Study participants who reported more than one traumatic life event were 11 percent more likely to be obese than those who did not experience a traumatic event, the findings showed. In addition, women who reported four or more negative life events within the previous five years were 36 percent more likely to be obese than those who reported no negative events. The link ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Obesity, Weight Loss, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Health Tip: Accept Help if Your Child Has Cancer

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Caring for a child with cancer can be emotionally and physically overwhelming. The Children's Oncology Group says the best thing such a parent can do is to accept help from friends and family. The group mentions these benefits of doing so: You will have more energy to take care of your child, spend time with your other children and connect with your partner. While there are some things that only you or your spouse can do for your child, there are plenty of things such as grocery shopping, cleaning, cooking and carpooling that others can help you with. Having support can help you feel better when coming to terms with a cancer diagnosis. Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Cancer, Leukemia

A Dangerous New Twist on Cyberbullying

Posted 13 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8, 2017 – As if the idea of teen cyberbullying isn't harrowing enough, a new study warns of a strange twist in which kids anonymously post hurtful messages – to themselves. The worry is that this digital self-harm – like traditional self-harm – may be a harbinger for suicide down the road, the study authors said. In the first survey of its kind, the nationally representative group of nearly 5,600 U.S. high school students was asked about "self-cyberbullying." The kids were all between the ages of 12 and 17. And about 6 percent said they had engaged in the practice. The risk for doing so was highest among those who had previously been victims of cyberbullying or bullying themselves. "We define 'digital self-harm' as the anonymous online posting, sending, or otherwise sharing of hurtful content about oneself," said study lead author Sameer Hinduja. He co-directs ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder

Surgical Residents Prime Candidates for Stress, Depression, Alcohol Abuse

Posted 13 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8, 2017 – Burnout is common among medical residents training to be surgeons, putting them at increased risk for alcohol abuse, anxiety, depression and suicidal thoughts, a new study suggests. But a stress-countering technique called mindfulness may help them, the study authors added. "Surgical trainees live in a culture where high stress is normative, but excessive stress must be addressed," said study lead author Dr. Carter Lebares, an assistant professor in the department of surgery at the University of California, San Francisco. "While surgical trainees have willingly chosen a high-stress career, the existence of overwhelming stress is evidenced by the strong association between stress and distress symptoms like depression, suicidal thoughts and high anxiety," Lebares added in a university news release. His team examined the responses of 566 surgical residents in the ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Surgery, Alcohol Dependence, Alcoholism, Acute Alcohol Intoxication

Your Friends May Be Key to a Healthy Aging Brain

Posted 13 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 8, 2017 – Getting along well with others may do more than just make life less stressful for seniors. A new study suggests that warm, supportive relationships might give a big memory boost to the aging brain. Researchers found that so-called SuperAgers – people 80 or older with the memory powers of those 50 to 65 – were more likely than those with average memory to report positive relationships in their lives. "One explanation is that maintaining friendships keeps your brain active and engaged," said study co-author Emily Rogalski. She's an associate professor at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. "You could think of this like healthy exercise for your brain," Rogalski added. The study doesn't prove that positive relationships improve memory, however. It's possible that their connection could be more complicated. For the new study, ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder

Yoga May Give Lung Cancer Patients, Caregivers a Boost

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 7, 2017 – For advanced lung cancer patients, yoga appears to help improve their overall physical function, stamina and mental health. And it appears to give their caregivers a boost, as well. The findings stem from a small study of 26 patients and caregivers. The study participants, most of whom were in their 60s, took part in an average of 12 yoga sessions. The focus was on breathing exercises, physical postures and meditation. "It is never too late to engage in exercise, and we know from earlier studies that people can exercise while being treated with chemotherapy or radiation," said study lead author Kathrin Milbury. "Caregivers sometimes have more anxiety and sleeping problems than patients. Therefore, we thought that having the patient and caregiver go through yoga instruction together would be beneficial for both partners," she explained. Milbury is an assistant ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Cancer, Lung Cancer, History - Radiation Therapy

Yoga May Give Lung Cancer Patients, Caregivers a Boost

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 7, 2017 – For advanced lung cancer patients, yoga appears to help improve their overall physical function, stamina and mental health. And it appears to give their caregivers a boost, as well. The findings stem from a small study of 26 patients and caregivers. The study participants, most of whom were in their 60s, took part in an average of 12 yoga sessions. The focus was on breathing exercises, physical postures and meditation. "It is never too late to engage in exercise, and we know from earlier studies that people can exercise while being treated with chemotherapy or radiation," said study lead author Kathrin Milbury. "Caregivers sometimes have more anxiety and sleeping problems than patients. Therefore, we thought that having the patient and caregiver go through yoga instruction together would be beneficial for both partners," she explained. Milbury is an assistant ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Cancer, Lung Cancer, History - Radiation Therapy

Does All That Social Media Time Harm Young Minds?

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 7, 2017 – Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, texting: Sometimes it seems today's young adults are online more often than not. But new research suggests that the amount of time young adults spend on social media doesn't seem to affect their risk for mental health problems. The finding came from a study of 467 young adults who were asked about how much time each day they used social media, the importance of it in their lives and the way they used it. They also were asked about mental health issues such as social anxiety, loneliness, decreased empathy and suicidal thoughts. The researchers found little association between the amount of time spent on social media and mental health problems. The results were published online Nov. 1 in the journal Psychiatric Quarterly. The only area of concern was what the researchers called "vaguebooking," which refers to social media posts that ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Dysthymia

Helping Children Cope When a Mass Tragedy Strikes

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 6, 2017 – Mass slayings, like the church shooting in Texas Sunday that left at least 26 dead, are hard enough for adults to comprehend. For children, these tragedies can make the world seem like a terrifying place. In the wake of such bloodshed, a New Jersey family physician offers guidance to parents trying to help children manage their fears. Start by shielding your kids from the news reports, suggested Dr. Jennifer Caudle, an associate professor at Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Stratford. "Children may become upset by news coverage," Caudle said. So monitor and limit what they see, hear or read. This may reduce their anxiety and help them deal with these unsettling events, she explained. The Sutherland Springs, Texas, massacre was just the latest in a series of recent mass killings in the United States. In New York City on Halloween, a terrorist ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Fatigue, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Nightmares, Night Terrors

Page 1 2 3 ... Next

Ask a Question

Further Information

Related Condition Support Groups

Anxiety

Related Drug Support Groups

Prozac, Celexa, citalopram, Paxil, sertraline, amitriptyline, venlafaxine, fluoxetine, Elavil, view more... paroxetine, Luvox, prazosin, valerian, fluvoxamine, Endep, kava, Luvox CR, Prozac Weekly, Vanatrip