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Related terms: Acute Stress Reaction

Early Family Deaths May Create 'Grief Gap' for Blacks

Posted 25 minutes ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 23, 2017 – Black Americans tend to lose a parent, other close relatives and spouses at earlier ages than whites, creating a potentially devastating "grief gap," new research suggests. Studying more than 42,000 racially diverse Americans, the researchers found that death strikes black families significantly earlier than whites on average. "Blacks were three times more likely to lose a mother, twice as likely to lose a father, and 2.5 times more likely to lose a child by age 30," said study lead author Debra Umberson. "And they're 90 percent more likely to experience four or more family deaths by age 60." The full effect is unclear, said Umberson, a professor of sociology at the University of Texas at Austin. Still, earlier research has shown that the death of a parent, child or spouse is the most stressful life event you can experience, which can lead to other stressors ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Postpartum Depression, Dysthymia

Does 'Juvy' Confinement Jeopardize Long-Term Health?

Posted 6 hours ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 23, 2017 – Young people in juvenile detention or jail may suffer health effects that last well into adulthood, a pair of new studies suggests. Together, they suggest incarcerated teens will face higher rates of depression, worse physical health, and a greater risk of sexually transmitted diseases, compared to other young Americans. Experts said the studies highlight a little-recognized fact: Youth incarceration is a public health problem. The United States has the highest rate of "youth confinement" of any developed country, according to the advocacy group Campaign for Youth Justice. In 2013, out of every 100,000 minors, 173 were in confinement nationwide. "Juvenile incarceration is its own hidden epidemic," said Ralph DiClemente of Emory University in Atlanta. DiClemente, a professor of public health, wrote an editorial accompanying the studies, published online Jan. 23 ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Agitation, Psychiatric Disorders, Aggressive Behavior

Stress May Explain Digestive Issues in Kids With Autism

Posted 3 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 20, 2017 – Many children with autism suffer from gastrointestinal problems, such as belly pain and constipation. And new research suggests that these issues may stem from a heightened response to stress. "When treating a patient with autism who has constipation and other lower gastrointestinal issues, physicians may give them a laxative to address these issues," said study author Dr. David Beversdorf. "Our findings suggest there may be a subset of patients for which there may be other contributing factors. More research is needed, but anxiety and stress reactivity may be an important factor when treating these patients," he added. Beversdorf is an associate professor at the University of Missouri-Columbia's Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders. The new study included 120 young people with autism and their parents. The parents provided information ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Autism, Gastrointestinal Disorders, Asperger Syndrome

Screen Time May Not Be So Bad for Teens After All

Posted 3 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 20, 2017 – Teens who log hours of screen time every day – on video games, smartphones, computers, TV and the like – may not be doing themselves any harm, a new study suggests. A digital "sweet spot" of screen time might even benefit teens' well-being by allowing them to develop social connections and personal skills, according to the findings. "Moderate levels of daily screen time do not appear to be harmful," said lead researcher Andrew Przybylski. He is an experimental psychologist with the Oxford Internet Institute at the University of Oxford. "In fact, even excessive levels of screen time appear unlikely to have significant negative effect." However, several child health experts said they weren't ready to blindly embrace the new study's conclusions that too much screen time may not be too much of a good thing. The research included more than 120,000 teenagers in the ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diagnosis and Investigation

Obamacare Covered More People With Mental Illness, Addictions

Posted 3 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 20, 2017 – More Americans with mental illness and substance abuse disorders got health insurance after the Affordable Care Act was introduced, a new study shows. However, these patients still face significant barriers to treatment, the Johns Hopkins researchers added. "The Affordable Care Act has been very effective in reducing the uninsured rate in this vulnerable population, where there is a real need to get people into services," said study leader Brendan Saloner. He's an assistant professor in the department of health policy and management. "We got more people covered, but we didn't make dramatic progress in closing the under-treatment gap," Saloner said in a university news release. "We need to find ways to take the next step and ensure people are seeing the providers who can help them." For the study, researchers reviewed data from nearly 30,000 adults, aged 18 to ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Bipolar Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Lexapro, Zoloft, Wellbutrin, Cymbalta, Effexor, Prozac, Opiate Dependence, Seroquel, Celexa, Citalopram, Major Depressive Disorder, Paxil, Trazodone, Abilify, Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Sertraline

Many With Mental Illness Miss Out on HIV Tests

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 19, 2017 – People with severe mental illness are only slightly more likely to be screened for HIV than those in the general population, a new study finds. And that's true even though they're at higher risk for infection with the AIDS-causing virus, the researchers added. The study included nearly 57,000 Medicaid patients in California. They were between the ages of 18 and 67. They were all taking medications to treat bipolar disorder, schizophrenia or major depression with psychosis. Just under 7 percent had HIV testing, compared with 5 percent of the state's general population in 2011, according to the study. The authors said their findings suggest a missed opportunity to treat HIV infection early in people with severe mental illness. The risk of HIV may be up to 15 percent higher in people with severe mental illness than in the general population, the researchers said. ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Bipolar Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Major Depressive Disorder, Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Schizophrenia, HIV Infection, Schizoaffective Disorder, Psychiatric Disorders, Asperger Syndrome, Drug Psychosis

Most Smokers With Mental Illness Want to Kick the Habit

Posted 7 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 16, 2017 – Nearly six in 10 Americans with severe mental illness smoke, and a new study suggests that many of them want to quit. The problem is that many of these patients don't get help from their psychiatrists and caseworkers, researchers report. "Patients with serious mental illness die an average of 25 years younger than people who don't have these problems, and smoking is a big factor," said study author Dr. Li-Shiun Chen. She's an assistant professor of psychiatry at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. "Smoking is a common and serious problem for our patients, and although smoking rates have been decreasing in the general population, the rates remain very high in this vulnerable population," Chen said in a university news release. In the past, psychiatric wards allowed patients to smoke so they could focus on treatment for their mental conditions, ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Major Depressive Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Smoking, Schizophrenia, Paranoid Disorder, Schizoaffective Disorder, Smoking Cessation, Psychosis, Psychiatric Disorders, Seasonal Affective Disorder, Drug Psychosis

U.S. Report Cites the Good and Bad on Marijuana

Posted 11 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 12, 2017 – Current medical science has proven there are legitimate medical uses for marijuana and cannabis-derived drugs, a new report from the National Academy of Sciences states. Conclusive or substantial scientific evidence has shown that marijuana products are effective at treating chronic pain, calming muscle spasms caused by multiple sclerosis, and easing nausea from chemotherapy, the report said. However, there's little to no evidence supporting any of the other numerous health claims related to marijuana, the report said. And there's a downside as well – marijuana use comes with a host of potential health risks, whether someone is using the drug medicinally or recreationally, according to the report. The report calls on government to ease regulations that hamper research into marijuana, so scientists can sort the wheat from the chaff when it comes to medical ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Muscle Spasm, Chronic Pain, Muscle Pain, Social Anxiety Disorder, Multiple Sclerosis, Schizophrenia, Schizoaffective Disorder, Breakthrough Pain, Cannabis, Chronic Spasticity, Spasticity, Lower Limb Spasticity, Spinal Spasticity

'Stress Ball' in Your Brain May Be Key to Heart Risks

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11, 2017 – Doctors have long known that a stressed life does no favors for the heart, and new research may help unravel why that's so. A Harvard team says heightened activity in a key part of the brain may explain why stress boosts people's odds for heart disease and stroke. The finding "raises the possibility that reducing stress could produce benefits that extend beyond an improved sense of psychological well-being," said study lead author Dr. Ahmed Tawakol, who co-directs the cardiac imaging program at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. One neurologist agreed that the research could have real value for patients. "This study provides information that can help us better understand the mechanisms in which the body and the brain affect each other," said Dr. Jeffrey Borenstein. He is president of the Brain & Behavior Foundation in New York City. "A better ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Attack, Heart Failure, Congestive Heart Failure, Myocardial Infarction, Left Ventricular Dysfunction, Peripheral Arterial Disease, Intermittent Claudication, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Body Imaging, Post MI Syndrome, Head Imaging

PG-13 Movies Show More Gun Violence Than R-Rated Films: Study

Posted 12 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11, 2017 – The most popular PG-13 movies now depict more acts of gun violence than R-rated films, a new look at the U.S. motion picture landscape reveals. The Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) states that a movie rated PG-13 is open to all viewers, but parental guidance is suggested. An R rating means a movie can't be seen by minors under the age of 17 unless they are accompanied by an adult. The new analysis updates an earlier 2012 investigation, which found that gun violence in the nation's top-grossing PG-13 films more than doubled between 1985 and 2012. By then, gun violence had begun to exceed that found in R-rated films. Since 2012, the prevalence of gun violence in PG-13 movies – albeit less bloody and more cartoon-like than R-rated movies – held steady through 2015. "There was no guarantee that the trend would continue, but that is what we found," ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Agitation, Agitated State, Psychiatric Disorders, Aggressive Behavior

Kids' Care May Suffer When Parents Clash With Medical Staff

Posted 13 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 10, 2017 – Rude parents can rattle medical staff enough to compromise the quality of care their critically ill child receives, a new study suggests. Medical teams in a neonatal intensive care unit made worse decisions during simulated emergency scenarios if they had been treated rudely by an actress playing the role of an angry family member, the researchers found. Exposure to rudeness helped explain about 40 percent of the variance in good medical decision-making between different teams in the study, said co-author Amir Erez. He is a professor with the University of Florida Warrington College of Business. "There is a lot of concern about medical errors, but the medical field is not paying attention at all to the effect that social interactions can have on performance," Erez said. "They need to pay attention to this, because this could potentially save lives." But, the ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Agitation, Agitated State

Poverty's Impact on a Child's Mental Health

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 9, 2017 – Growing up in poverty exposes children to greater levels of stress, which can lead to psychological problems later in life, a new study suggests. Researchers at Cornell University reported that kids who grow up poor are more likely to have reduced short-term spatial memory. The study also reported that such kids seem to be more prone to antisocial and aggressive behavior, such as bullying. Poor children are also more likely than kids from middle-income homes to feel powerless, the study authors suggested. Of course, the findings don't mean that all children growing up in poverty will have these problems, only that the risk is higher, the researchers said. "What this means is, if you're born poor, you're on a trajectory to have more of these kinds of psychological problems," study author Gary Evans, a professor of environmental and developmental psychology, said ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Bipolar Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Agitation, Agitated State, Psychiatric Disorders, Depressive Psychosis

Exercise: An Antidote for Behavioral Issues in Students?

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 9, 2017 – Children with serious behavioral disorders might fare better at school if they get some exercise during the day, a new study suggests. The researchers focused on children and teenagers with conditions that included autism spectrum disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), anxiety and depression. They looked at whether structured exercise during the school day – in the form of stationary "cybercycles" – could help ease students' behavioral issues in the classroom. Over a period of seven weeks, the study found it did. Kids were about one-third to 50 percent less likely to act out in class, compared to a seven-week period when they took standard gym classes. Those effects are meaningful, according to lead researcher April Bowling, who was a doctoral student at Harvard University at the time of the study. "On days that the students biked, they ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Adderall, Anxiety and Stress, Vyvanse, Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Social Anxiety Disorder, Concerta, Ritalin, Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Methylphenidate, Agitation, Psychiatric Disorders, Methylin, Daytrana, Ritalin LA, Metadate CD, Methylin ER, Lisdexamfetamine, Ritalin-SR, Quillivant XR

Gun Violence May Be 'Contagious,' Study Suggests

Posted 3 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 3, 2017 – To predict someone's risk of becoming a victim of gun violence, a new study offers a suggestion: Look at the company they keep. Researchers report that gun violence may actually be "contagious," with social networks acting as a breeding ground for the spread of gun exposure and violence. "Those at the highest risk of gun violence are the individuals with the most associates who have recently been shot," said study author Ben Green, a doctoral candidate at Harvard Law School, in Cambridge, Mass. But that risk is also a function of timing and the nature of the relationships, Green added. "When someone gets shot, his influence on [his] associates decreases over time," he explained. "Additionally, the strength of the contagion risk depends on how close one's relationship is with that person. For example, a friend being shot creates more risk for you than does a ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Borderline Personality Disorder, Agitation, Agitated State, Psychiatric Disorders, Aggressive Behavior

Sleep May Help People Process Traumatic Events

Posted 2 Jan 2017 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 2, 2017 – Sleeping soon after a traumatic event can help some people cope, a new Swiss study suggests. Two groups of volunteers were shown a video with traumatic images. One group slept for the night after seeing the video. The other group stayed awake. Participants recorded their memories of the images for several days. "Our results reveal that people who slept after the film had fewer and less distressing recurring emotional memories than those who were awake," said study author Birgit Kleim. She is a clinical psychological scientist in the department of psychiatry, psychotherapy and psychosomatics at the University of Zurich. "This supports the assumption that sleep may have a protective effect in the aftermath of traumatic experiences," she added in a university news release. Sleep can help weaken emotions linked with memories, such as fear caused by a traumatic event. ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

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