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Related terms: Acute Stress Reaction

Behavior Changes May Be First Signs of Alzheimer's

Posted 3 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 25, 2016 – Certain behavior changes may be a harbinger of Alzheimer's disease, and researchers say they've developed a symptom "checklist" that might aid earlier diagnosis. Experts have long focused on so-called mild cognitive impairment as an early warning sign of Alzheimer's disease. That refers to problems with memory and thinking that may or may not progress to full-blown dementia. But now some researchers are zeroing in on a new concept they call "mild behavioral impairment." The term is meant to describe persistent changes in an older person's normal behavior. The changes include problems like social withdrawal, angry outbursts, anxiety and obsessiveness. "We're not talking about a blip in someone's behavior," said Dr. Zahinoor Ismail, of the University of Calgary's Hotchkiss Brain Institute, in Canada. "It's a sustained change from their former ways of functioning." ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment

Menopause: Not All Hot Flashes Are Created Equal

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 22, 2016 – The hot flashes and night sweats of menopause don't play out the same for all women, new research shows. Almost 80 percent of women do get hot flashes, night sweats or both during menopause, the researchers found. But the timing of these symptoms and how long they last appear to vary a great deal, with factors such as body weight, race, education and dietary habits tending to predict the patterns. "We used to think these symptoms lasted from three to five years, right around the time of the final menstrual period," said senior study author Rebecca Thurston. She is director of the Women's Biobehavioral Health Lab at the University of Pittsburgh. "We now know that these symptoms persist for far longer – typically seven to 10 years – and occur at different times for different women," she added. Thurston's team followed nearly 1,500 women as they transitioned ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Obesity, Hot Flashes, Menopausal Disorders, Weight Loss, Postmenopausal Symptoms, Atrophic Vaginitis, Perimenopausal Symptoms, Dyspareunia, Atrophic Urethritis, Vaginal Dryness, Premenopausal Anovulation

Limit Kids' Exposure to Media Violence, Pediatricians Say

Posted 10 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 18, 2016 – Media violence has become a routine part of the daily lives of American children, and parents, lawmakers and the media should take steps to change that, a leading pediatricians' group recommends. The new policy statement, from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), calls on pediatricians to routinely ask about children's "media diet," and for parents to limit the violent content their kids see – whether on TV, online or in video games. Video gaming is a particular concern, partly because of the advent of 3D technology that creates a "more immersive experience with violence," said statement author Dr. Dimitri Christakis. Christakis directs the Center for Child Health, Behavior and Development at Seattle Children's Research Institute. The policy statement points to a "proven scientific connection" between virtual violence and real-life aggression, the doctors ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Agitation, Agitated State

9 Out of 10 Strokes Could Be Prevented, Study Finds

Posted 13 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 15, 2016 – Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability but the vast majority of strokes are preventable, according to a new study. Researchers discovered that 10 controllable risk factors account for 90 percent of all strokes worldwide. Of these modifiable risk factors, high blood pressure (hypertension) is the most important. "The study confirms that hypertension is the most important modifiable risk factor in all regions, and the key target in reducing the burden of stroke globally," said study co-leader Dr. Martin O'Donnell. He is an associate clinical professor in the Population Health Research Institute at McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada, and the HRB-Clinical Research Facility in Galway, Ireland. Preventing strokes is a major public health priority and strategies for reducing people's risk should be based on key preventable causes of stroke, the ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Anxiety and Stress, Diabetes, Type 2, Obesity, Hypertension, Smoking, Ischemic Stroke, High Cholesterol, Smoking Cessation, Transient Ischemic Attack, Pre-Diabetes, Alcoholism, Diabetes Mellitus, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Intracranial Hemorrhage, Abnormal Glucose Tolerance, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Acute Alcohol Intoxication

4 in 10 Americans Think Work Affects Their Health: Poll

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 13, 2016 – Many Americans think their job takes a toll on everything from their health and stress levels to their eating and sleeping habits, a new poll found. "The takeaway here is that job number one for U.S. employers is to reduce stress in the workplace," said poll director Robert Blendon. He is the Richard L. Menschel Professor of Health Policy and Political Analysis at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston. The poll, which included phone interviews with more than 1,600 workers in the United States, found that 44 percent think their job affects their overall health. And only 28 percent of those people believe the influence is positive. Among the 16 percent who think their job is taking a toll on their health are those with disabilities, those with dangerous jobs, those working more than 50 hours a week, those working in retail and those earning ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Bronchiectasis, Respiratory Tract Disease, Reversible Airways Disease

Can Trauma Trigger Violent Crime in Mentally Ill?

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 13, 2016 – People with serious mental illness who are victims of violence or exposed to stressful events are more likely to engage in a violent crime in the week following the trauma, a new study contends. Stressful experiences also affect people without psychiatric disorders, but not to the same extent, the researchers said. Some stressful events – such as being violently victimized, injured in an accident, losing one's parents or self-harming – act as "triggers," said study co-author Dr. Seena Fazel. He is a professor of forensic psychiatry at the University of Oxford in England. Experiencing one of these events increases the risk of committing a violent criminal act within a week of the trigger, especially in people with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, Fazel said. People diagnosed with these conditions have higher rates of criminal convictions than the general ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Schizophrenia, Paranoid Disorder, Schizoaffective Disorder, Agitation, Psychosis, Agitated State, Psychiatric Disorders, Drug Psychosis, Executive Function Disorder

Health Tip: Manage Emotional Stress

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Life's many changes can be stressful, which may harm your health. The American Academy of Family Physicians advises: Learn to recognize the first signs of stress, such as neck stiffness or clenching a fist. Learn to let go of things you can't control. For stressful situations such as a job interview, prepare as much as you can. Change your outlook. View changes as a challenge, rather than a threat. If there are conflicts at work, try to resolve them. Don't overschedule yourself. Find a friend, loved one or other trusted source to talk with when you feel stressed. Engage in an activity that helps you feel relaxed, such as a hobby or sport. Get regular exercise, nutritious meals and plenty of sleep. Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder

Hovering Parents May Harm Kids

Posted 27 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, June 25, 2016 – Children with "intrusive" parents who push too hard for good grades may be more prone to become highly self-critical or anxious and depressed, a new study suggests. "When parents become intrusive in their children's lives, it may signal to the children that what they do is never good enough," said study leader Ryan Hong, an assistant professor in the department of psychology at the National University of Singapore. The five-year study of primary school students in Singapore found that those whose parents acted intrusively, had high expectations of academic performance or overreacted when the child made a mistake were at increased risk of being overly critical of themselves. The researchers also found that children who were highly self-critical had higher levels of anxiety or depression symptoms, although the study did not prove that parental pressure caused ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Dysthymia, Seasonal Affective Disorder

Behavior Woes Hamper Boys More Than Girls in School: Study

Posted 22 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, June 22, 2016 – Behavior problems are more likely to hold boys back in school than girls, a new study shows. "When I compared 4- and 5-year-old boys and girls who had the same levels of behavior problems – including difficulty sustaining attention, regulating emotions, delaying gratification, and forming positive relationships with teachers and peers – I found that boys were less likely to learn and more likely to be held back in school," said study author Jayanti Owens. She is a professor at Brown University in Rhode Island. "My study also showed that the way schools respond to boys' behaviors plays a significant role in shaping their educational outcomes years later," Owens said in an American Sociological Association news release. "Relative to the other early childhood family and health factors I considered, gender differences in both students' behavior and educators' ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Agitation, Executive Function Disorder

'Love Hormone' Gene May Be Key to Social Life

Posted 21 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 21, 2016 – Lower activity of a specific gene may affect a person's social behavior, including the ability to form healthy relationships, researchers say. The OXT gene is involved in the production of oxytocin, a hormone linked with a large number of social behaviors in people. It's sometimes referred to as the "love hormone." The University of Georgia team assessed more than 120 people, conducting genetic tests and assessments of social skills, brain structure and brain function. The investigators found that those with lower activity of the OXT gene had a harder time recognizing emotional facial expressions and tended to be more anxious about their relationships with loved ones. These low-OXT people also had less activity in brain regions associated with social thinking. And they had less gray matter in an area of the brain important for face processing and social ... Read more

Related support groups: Birth Control, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Contraception, Anxiety and Stress, Emergency Contraception, Social Anxiety Disorder, Postcoital Contraception, Oxytocin, Pitocin, Diagnosis and Investigation, Syntocinon

Aging May Blunt Some of Exercise's Benefits

Posted 17 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 17, 2016 – Aging may dampen some beneficial effects of exercise, a new study suggests. But, that's no reason for seniors to morph into couch potatoes, health experts say. For the new study, researchers compared men aged 18 to 30 with men 55 and older who used exercise bikes for 30 minutes. During that time, blood samples were collected six different times, to assess cell function and antioxidant response. Antioxidants are believed to protect healthy cells from damage caused by unstable molecules called "free radicals," according to the U.S. National Institutes of Health. "Through this study, we were able to determine that an individual's antioxidant response to exercise becomes suppressed with age," researcher Tinna Traustadottir, an associate professor of biology at Northern Arizona University, said in a university news release. "Exercise is effective and critical for ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Shouting? The 'Silent Treatment'? How Spouses Argue Linked to Physical Ills

Posted 14 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 14, 2016 – How spouses disagree may predict which ones are more likely to develop certain ailments down the road, new research suggests. Analyzing 156 older couples over 20 years, scientists found that patterns of angry outbursts raised the risk of heart problems, while emotional withdrawal or "stonewalling" could lead to musculoskeletal issues such as back pain or stiff neck. "We've known for a long time that stress and negative emotions are bad for your health," said study author Claudia Haase. She's an assistant professor of human development and social policy at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill. "But in our new study we wanted to dig deeper, and found that very specific behaviors led to specific health problems over time," she added. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and a major cause of disability worldwide, according to the World Health ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Anxiety and Stress, Back Pain, Muscle Pain, Chronic Pain, Heart Disease, Neck Pain, Agitation, Frozen Shoulder, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease

The Childhood Incidents That Increase Later Suicide Risk

Posted 13 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 13, 2016 – Adults who witnessed parental domestic violence in childhood are at increased risk for suicide attempts, a new study finds. "When domestic violence is chronic in a home, there is a risk of long-term negative outcomes for the children, even when the children themselves are not abused," said study lead author Esme Fuller-Thomson. She is a professor with the University of Toronto's Faculty of Social Work. The researchers examined data from more than 22,500 Canadian adults. They found that about 17 percent of those exposed to chronic parental domestic violence (more than 10 times before age 16) had attempted suicide, compared with roughly 2 percent of those not exposed to parental domestic violence. "We had expected that the association between chronic parental domestic violence and later suicide attempts would be explained by childhood sexual or physical abuse, or ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Opiate Dependence, Major Depressive Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Drug Dependence, Dysthymia, Substance Abuse, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse

Kids Gain From More 'Dad Time'

Posted 13 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 13, 2016 – Fathers play a unique and important role in their children's development, a new report shows. Just in time for Father's Day, the American Academy of Pediatrics report says U.S. dads are more involved in child care than ever before. At the same time, studies show that those involved fathers have important effects on kids' health and well-being. "From everyone's standpoint, the more we can do to encourage fathers' involvement, the better," said Dr. Michael Yogman, a co-author of the report. "It's beneficial for kids. Fathers aren't just 'redundant,' doing the same things as mothers do," added Yogman, who chairs the academy's committee on psychosocial aspects of child and family health. Studies have found that older kids with involved fathers tend to have fewer depression symptoms and behavioral problems, and lower rates of teen pregnancy. When it comes to young ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress

Health Tip: Take Steps to Stay Mentally Healthy

Posted 13 Jun 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Mental health is as important as physical health, so take steps to keep yourself well. The University of Michigan Health System advises: Regularly do things you enjoy. Create a support network of friends and family. When you need help, don't be afraid to ask for it. Volunteer in your community. Find healthy ways to deal with stress, and find ways to laugh more. Set realistic goals. Don't turn to drugs and alcohol. Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Opiate Dependence, Social Anxiety Disorder, Drug Dependence, Alcoholism, Hangover, Toxic Reactions Incl Drug and Substance Abuse, Acute Alcohol Intoxication

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