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Early Introduction of Eggs, Peanuts May Cut Kids' Allergy Risk: Study

Posted 20 Sep 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 20, 2016 – Introducing babies to eggs or peanuts early on may help reduce their risk of food allergies, a new analysis finds. Researchers reviewed 146 previous studies that examined when babies were given foods that often trigger reactions, as well as their risk of food allergies or autoimmune diseases. They discovered that the timing of food introduction may affect allergy risk, but they found no similar link for autoimmune disease. The researchers reported with "moderate certainty" that babies who were given eggs when they were 4 months to 6 months old had a lower egg allergy risk. And children given peanuts between 4 months and 11 months of age had a lower peanut allergy risk than those who were older. The study, published Sept. 20 in the Journal of the American Medical Association, said early introduction could head off 24 cases of egg allergy per 1,000 people and 18 ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Celiac Disease, Angioedema, Anaphylaxis, Nasal Polyps, Nasal Polyps - Prevention, Oral Allergy Syndrome

Supervised Exposure Therapy for Peanut Allergy Lasts, Study Finds

Posted 4 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 4, 2016 – Once a tolerance to peanuts has developed in kids considered at high-risk for developing a peanut allergy, it seems to last, new research suggests. The children in the study developed a tolerance after they were fed peanuts for years as part of a supervised clinical trial. Now, the researchers are reporting that those youngsters maintained their tolerance for at least a year, even if they didn't keep eating peanuts. "The therapy persisted, and after 12 months of avoidance there was no increase in the rates of peanut allergy. They maintained their ability to tolerate peanuts, even though they hadn't been eating it," said Dr. Sherry Farzan, an allergist with Northwell Health in Great Neck, N.Y. Farzan wasn't involved in the research. This suggests that the immune system "learns" that peanut is not a threat to the body, and kids won't have to keep eating peanuts ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Angioedema, Anaphylaxis

Parents Often Ill-Informed About Food-Allergy Emergencies

Posted 26 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 26, 2016 – Many parents of children with food allergies say doctors did not discuss emergency care for their youngsters, a new study finds. It's crucial that parents have a written emergency plan for home and school, the study authors said. "This is potentially lifesaving information," study author Dr. Ruchi Gupta, an associate professor in pediatrics at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, said in a university news release. "Physicians need to make sure patients understand when and how to use epinephrine and that they have an emergency action plan," she added. Gupta's team surveyed 859 Chicago-area parents of children with food allergies. Less than 70 percent said their child's allergist explained when to use epinephrine, and less than 40 percent said their child's pediatrician did so, the study found. Even fewer parents said they were shown ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Angioedema, Anaphylaxis

Health Tip: If Allergic to Eggs

Posted 27 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

-- People who are allergic to eggs don't have to miss out on the tasty versatility that eggs offer. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics suggests these alternatives: In place of scrambled eggs, use cubed firm tofu. In the pan, gently smash it with a fork to make it crumble like a scrambled egg. Sprinkle with a little turmeric for yellow coloring. Use diced extra-firm tofu in place of hard-boiled eggs in salads and sandwiches. Or opt for white beans or baked, ready-to-eat tofu. Use chia seeds or flax seeds mixed with water (1 tablespoon seeds to 3 tablespoons water) in place of eggs in baking to help bind batter. You'll need to let the mixture rest for 15 to 20 minutes. Substitute applesauce, avocado, mashed banana, silken tofu or garbanzo beans for eggs to make baked goods creamier, more moist and richer. For a simple protein-rich snack, opt for Greek yogurt. One-quarter cup (plain, ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Angioedema, Anaphylaxis, Allergic Purpura

Do You Need a Doctor for Bug Bites and Bee Stings?

Posted 25 May 2015 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, May 24, 2015 – Summer is fast approaching, along with its usual bonanza of bugs. Fortunately, most of those inevitable bites and stings aren't serious. But, experts from the American Academy of Dermatology advise going to the emergency room right away if you notice any of the following symptoms soon after a bug bite or sting: Difficulty breathing, The feeling that your throat is closing, Swelling of lips, tongue or face, Chest pain, A racing heartbeat for more than a few minutes, Dizziness or headache, Vomiting. Also beware of a red rash that looks like a donut or bullseye target after a tick bite, or a fever with a spreading red or black spotty rash. These can be signs of serious tick-related illness. "Although most bug bites and stings do not turn into a severe or even fatal illness like Rocky Mountain spotted fever, it's important to pay attention to your symptoms," Dr. ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergies, Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Atarax, Cyproheptadine, Angioedema, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Chlorpheniramine, Xyzal, Anaphylaxis

Health Tip: Pollen Isn't the Only Allergen

Posted 13 May 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Pollen from weeds, grasses and trees are common culprits for seasonal allergies, but don't forget about other things that can trigger a case of the sneezes. The American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology says other possible allergens could include: Smoke from fires, whether indoor fireplaces during winter or outdoor bonfires during summer. Insect stings and bites. Chlorine used in pools. Ingredients in food and candy. Wreaths and pine trees used as holiday decorations. Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Smoking, Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Vistaril, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Atarax, Cyproheptadine, Angioedema, Fexofenadine

Poison Ivy, Oak and Sumac Rashes Can Be Serious

Posted 23 Apr 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 23, 2015 – Itchy, blistering rashes from poison ivy, oak and sumac are common and are caused by an oil in the plants called urushiol. Usually, you can deal with these rashes at home, the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) says. But you should go to the emergency room immediately if you have any of the following symptoms: Trouble breathing or swallowing, The rash covers most of your body, you have many rashes or blisters, or the rash develops anywhere on your face or genitals, You develop swelling, especially if an eyelid swells shut, Much of your skin itches, or nothing eases the itch. If you don't have any of these symptoms, you can probably treat the rash at home, according to the AAD. If you know you've touched poison ivy, poison oak or poison sumac, immediately rinse your skin with lukewarm, soapy water. This may remove some of the oil from the plants. ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Hives, Angioedema, Urticaria, Anaphylaxis, Allergic Urticaria

FDA Approves Ruconest for Hereditary Angioedema

Posted 18 Jul 2014 by Drugs.com

July 17, 2014 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration yesterday approved Ruconest, the first recombinant C1-Esterase Inhibitor product for the treatment of acute attacks in adult and adolescent patients with hereditary angioedema (HAE). Hereditary angioedema, which is caused by having insufficient amounts of a plasma protein called C1-esterase inhibitor, affects approximately 6,000 to 10,000 people in the United States. People with HAE can develop rapid swelling of the hands, feet, limbs, face, intestinal tract, or airway. These acute attacks of swelling can occur spontaneously, or can be triggered by stress, surgery or infection. Swelling of the airway is potentially fatal without immediate treatment. “Hereditary angioedema is a rare and potentially life-threatening disease,” said Karen Midthun, M.D., director of the FDA’s Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research. “Today’s approv ... Read more

Related support groups: Angioedema, Hereditary Angioedema, C1 Inhibitor (Human)

Ruconest Approved for Rare Genetic Disease

Posted 18 Jul 2014 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 17, 2014 – Ruconest has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat hereditary angioedema, a genetic disease that leads to sudden and potentially fatal swelling of the hands, feet, limbs, face, intestinal tract or airways. The disease, affecting as many as 10,000 people in the United States, is caused by the body's inability to produce enough of a plasma protein called C1-esterase inhibitor. The remedy is produced from the milk of genetically-modified rabbits, the FDA said Thursday in a news release. Ruconest was evaluated in a clinical study of 44 adults and adolescents with hereditary angioedema. The most common side effects recorded were headache, nausea and diarrhea. Ruconest is manufactured by the Netherlands-based Pharming Group NV, and will be distributed by a subsidiary of Salix Pharmaceuticals, based in Raleigh, NC. More information The FDA ... Read more

Related support groups: Angioedema, Hereditary Angioedema

Hospitalizations Up for Severe Skin Swelling

Posted 6 Mar 2012 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 6 – Hospitalizations from angiodema, a serious swelling of the deep layers of the skin often around the eyes and mouth, are on the rise, new research finds. Researchers from New York Downtown Hospital searched a national database for hospitalizations due to allergic reactions including hives, anaphylaxis (a potentially fatal whole-body reaction) and angiodema. While hospitalization rates for the other allergic reactions stayed the same from 2000 to 2009, angiodema rates doubled, according to the study, scheduled for presentation Tuesday at the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology meeting in Orlando. Adverse reactions to ACE-inhibitors, a blood pressure medication, could be part of the problem, said lead study author Robert Lin in an academy news release. Being black, having congestive heart failure, kidney disease, asthma and older age were also associated ... Read more

Related support groups: Angioedema

Health Tip: Some Facts About Angiodema

Posted 6 Sep 2011 by Drugs.com

-- Angiodema is the medical term for hive-like swelling beneath the skin. It's often caused by an allergic reaction. The U.S. National Library of Medicine mentions these common triggers for angiodema: Outdoor allergens, such as pollen. Animal dander. Exposure to significant heat, cold, sunlight or water. Foods that cause allergies in many people, such as milk, nuts, shellfish or eggs. An insect bite or sting. Certain medications, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), blood pressure drugs, and certain antibiotics such as penicillin. If someone has difficulty breathing in addition to the swelling, seek emergency medical treatment immediately. Read more

Related support groups: Angioedema

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Related Condition Support Groups

Hereditary Angioedema, Allergies

Related Drug Support Groups

Winstrol, stanozolol, danazol, Danocrine