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Symptom Checker

Step 4: Read and complete the decision guide to learn more about your symptoms.

Ankle Pain

fracture - a broken bone, usually after a significant injury (or a more minor injury if you have osteoporosis)

gout - a form of "crystal" arthritis, in which deposits of uric acid (a waste product in the blood) accumulate in the joint, causing inflammation

infectious arthritis - a virus, bacterium or other organism can deposit in the joint through the blood (or directly through a wound) causing inflammation

inflammatory bowel disease-associated arthritis - a subset of persons with ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease who have joint inflammation in one or several joints, sometimes along with back pain

Lyme disease - an infection related to organisms found in deer ticks which bite humans, causing a rash, and months later, a form of arthritis most commonly affecting the knee

psoriatic arthritis - 10-20 percentof people with psoriasis develop arthritis of one or a few joints, sometimes with low back pain

Reiter's syndrome - a form of arthritis involving one or a few joints, sometimes with low back pain, that follow by weeks or months, a diarrheal infection or a sexually transmitted disease; the arthritis alone is often called "reactive arthritis" because it is thought to be a misguided immune reaction to the infection (which is gone by the time the arthritis begins)

rheumatoid arthritis - a cause of arthritis in multiple joints, especially small joints of hands and wrists, which is usually symmetric (meaning that both sides of the body are affected similarly)

sarcoidosis - a condition of unknown cause in which lymph nodes may be enlarged (especially in the chest, seen on a chest x-ray), and inflammation in many parts of the body may develop, including joints, eye, skin and lungs

sprain - a stretched or torn ligament, often caused by an injury


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