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Trileptal FDA Alerts

The FDA Alert(s) below may be specifically about Trileptal or relate to a group or class of drugs which include Trileptal (oxcarbazepine).

MedWatch Safety Alerts are distributed by the FDA and published by Drugs.com. Following is a list of possible medication recalls, market withdrawals, alerts and warnings. For the latest FDA MedWatch alerts, go here.

Recent FDA Alert(s) for oxcarbazepine

Ibuprofen and Oxcarbazepine Tablets by American Health Packaging: Recall - Mislabeled Packaging

Jul 21, 2014

Audience: Pharmacy, Neurology, Pain Management, Rheumatology

ISSUE: American Health Packaging (AHP) voluntarily recalled Lot #142588, Expiration Date, 01/2016 of Ibuprofen Tablets, USP, 600 mg, in a hospital unit dose presentation that may contain individual blistered doses labeled as Oxcarbazepine Tablets, 300 mg, lot #142544. In addition, AHP voluntarily recalled Oxcarbazepine Tablets, 300 mg, lot #142544, Expiration Date, 02/2016. This recall is the result of mislabeled inner unit dose blister packaging which could result in patients receiving ibuprofen and missing their scheduled dose of oxcarbazepine. Failure to receive the proper dose of oxcarbazepine could increase the chances of having a seizure. Inadvertent consumption of ibuprofen may cause adverse reactions in a number of patients in which use of ibuprofen is contraindicated

BACKGROUND: Oxcarbazepine is used for treating certain types of seizures in patients with epilepsy.

Cartons of 100 count (10x10) Hospital Unit Dose blisters of AHP Ibuprofen Tablets, USP, 600 mg, with outer carton NDC#: 68084-703-01 and individual dose NDC#: 68084-703-11, Lot #142588, Expiration Date, 01/2016. The drug product can be identified by physical description: white, oval-shaped, film-coated tablets, with IP 465 printed on one side.

Cartons of 100 count (10x10) Hospital Unit Dose blisters of AHP Oxcarbazepine Tablets, 300 mg, with outer carton NDC#: 62584-143-0 and individual dose NDC#: 62584-143-11, Lot #142544, Expiration Date, 02/2016. The drug product can be identified by physical description: yellow color, capsule shaped, film-coated tablets scored and debossed with '1 84' on one side and scored on other side.

These hospital unit dose products were distributed nationwide beginning June 20, 2014

RECOMMENDATION: Notification of the recall has been sent to distributors who received the affected product with instructions on how to notify their customers.

Consumers who have received the recalled product should immediately discontinue use and contact GENCO Pharmaceutical Services at 855-419-4608 from 7am to 5pm CST for instructions on returning the recalled product.

For medical information questions or product complaints related to Oxcarbazepine Tablets, 300 mg or Ibuprofen Tablets, USP, 600 mg please contact American Health Packaging customer service at 1-800-707-4621 from 8am to 4pm EST.

Healthcare professionals and patients are encouraged to report adverse events or side effects related to the use of these products to the FDA's MedWatch Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting Program:

[07/21/2014 - Press Release - American Health Packaging]

Antiepileptic Drugs

May 5, 2009

Audience: Neuropsychiatric healthcare professionals, other healthcare professionals, patients

[UPDATE 05/05/2009] FDA notified healthcare professionals that it approved updated labeling for antiepileptic drugs used to treat epilepsy, psychiatric disorders, and other conditions (e.g., migraine and neuropathic pain syndromes). FDA also required development of a medication guide, to be issued to patients each time the product is dispensed. Since issuing safety alerts on December 16, 2008 and January 31, 2008, FDA has been working with the manufacturers of drugs in this class to better understand the suicidality risk. Eleven antiepileptic drugs were included in a pooled analysis of placebo-controlled clinical studies in which these drugs were used to treat epilepsy as well as psychiatric disorders and other conditions. The increased risk of suicidal thoughts or behavior was generally consistent among the eleven drugs, with varying mechanisms of action and across a range of indications. This observation suggests that the risk applies to all antiepileptic drugs used for any indication.

[UPDATE 12/16/2008] The FDA has completed its analysis of reports of suicidality (suicidal behavior or ideation [thoughts]) from placebo-controlled clinical trials of drugs used to treat epilepsy, psychiatric disorders, and other conditions. Based on the outcome of this review, FDA is requiring that all manufacturers of drugs in this class include a Warning in their labeling and develop a Medication Guide to be provided to patients prescribed these drugs to inform them of the risks of suicidal thoughts or actions.

[Posted 01/31/2008] FDA informed healthcare professionals that the Agency has analyzed reports of suicidality (suicidal behavior or ideation) from placebo-controlled clinical studies of eleven drugs used to treat epilepsy as well as psychiatric disorders, and other conditions. In the FDA's analysis, patients receiving antiepileptic drugs had approximately twice the risk of suicidal behavior or ideation (0.43%) compared to patients receiving placebo (0.22%). The increased risk of suicidal behavior and suicidal ideation was observed as early as one week after starting the antiepileptic drug and continued through 24 weeks. The results were generally consistent among the eleven drugs. The relative risk for suicidality was higher in patients with epilepsy compared to patients who were given one of the drugs in the class for psychiatric or other conditions.

Healthcare professionals should closely monitor all patients currently taking or starting any antiepileptic drug for notable changes in behavior that could indicate the emergence or worsening of suicidal thoughts or behavior or depression.

The drugs included in the analyses include (some of these drugs are also available in generic form):

Carbamazepine (marketed as Carbatrol, Equetro, Tegretol, Tegretol XR)
Felbamate (marketed as Felbatol)
Gabapentin (marketed as Neurontin)
Lamotrigine (marketed as Lamictal)
Levetiracetam (marketed as Keppra)
Oxcarbazepine (marketed as Trileptal)
Pregabalin (marketed as Lyrica)
Tiagabine (marketed as Gabitril)
Topiramate (marketed as Topamax)
Valproate (marketed as Depakote, Depakote ER, Depakene, Depacon)
Zonisamide (marketed as Zonegran)

Although the 11 drugs listed above were the ones included in the analysis, FDA expects that the increased risk of suicidality is shared by all antiepileptic drugs and anticipates that the class labeling changes will be applied broadly.

[December 16, 2008; UPDATED May 05, 2009 - Drug Information Page - FDA]
[January 31, 2008 - Healthcare Professional Information Sheet - FDA]

Trileptal (oxcarbazepine) Tablets and Oral Solution

Apr 19, 2005

Audience: Neuropsychiatric healthcare professionals and consumers

Novartis Pharmaceuticals and FDA notified healthcare professionals about revisions to the WARNINGS and PRECAUTIONS sections of the prescribing information for TRILEPTAL (oxcarbazepine) tablets and oral suspension, indicated for use as monotherapy or adjunctive therapy in the treatment of partial seizures in adults and children ages 4-16 years with epilepsy. The updated WARNINGS section describes serious dermatological reactions, including Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) that have been reported in both children and adults in association with Trileptal use. The PRECAUTIONS section has been updated to include language regarding multi-organ hypersensitivity reactions that have been reported in association with Trileptal use.

[April 18, 2005 - Dear Healthcare Professional Letter - Novartis]
[March 2005 - Revised Label, Highlighted - FDA]

More Trileptal Resources