Trifluoperazine Dosage

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Usual Adult Dose for:

Usual Geriatric Dose for:

Usual Pediatric Dose for:

Additional dosage information:

Usual Adult Dose for Schizophrenia

Oral:
Initial dose: 2 to 5 mg twice a day (small or emaciated patients should be started on the lower dosage).
Maintenance dose: 15 to 20 mg/day, occasionally up to 40 mg/day or more in some cases. Optimum therapeutic dosage levels should be reached within 2 or 3 weeks.

IM:
For patients requiring prompt control of severe symptoms:
1 to 2 mg (1/2 to 1 mL) by deep IM injection every 4 to 6 hours as needed. Dosages exceeding 6 mg/24 hours are rarely necessary, and only in very exceptional cases should the dosage exceed 10 mg/24 hours.

Injections should not be given at intervals of less than 4 hours because of a possible cumulative effect.

Usual Adult Dose for Anxiety

For treatment of nonpsychotic anxiety:
1 or 2 mg orally twice daily, not to exceed 6 mg/day or for longer than 12 weeks.

Usual Geriatric Dose for Schizophrenia

Oral:
Initial dose: 2 mg twice a day.
Maintenance dose: 15 mg/day.
Optimum therapeutic dosage levels should be reached within 2 or 3 weeks.

IM:
For patients requiring prompt control of severe symptoms:
1 mg (1/2 mL) by deep IM injection every 4 to 6 hours as needed. Injections should not be given at intervals of less than 4 hours because of a possible cumulative effect.

In general, dosages in the lower range are sufficient for most elderly patients. Since they appear to be more susceptible to hypotension and neuromuscular reactions, such patients should be observed closely.

Usual Geriatric Dose for Anxiety

For treatment of nonpsychotic anxiety:
1 mg orally twice daily for no more than 12 weeks.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Schizophrenia

6 to 12 years (patients who are hospitalized or under close supervision):

Oral:
Initial dose: 1 mg once or twice a day.
Dosage may be increased gradually until symptoms are controlled or until side effects become troublesome. While dosages exceeding 15 mg/day are generally not necessary, some older children with severe symptoms may require higher dosages.

IM:
There has been little experience with the use of trifluoperazine injection in children. However, if it is necessary to achieve rapid control of severe symptoms, 1 mg (1/2 mL) of the drug may be administered IM once or twice a day.

Dosage should be adjusted to the weight of the child and severity of the symptoms.

Renal Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Liver Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Dose Adjustments

Dosage should be adjusted to the needs of the individual and increased more gradually in debilitated or emaciated patients. The lowest effective dosage should always be used. When maximum response is achieved, dosage may be reduced gradually to a maintenance level. Because of the inherent long action of the drug, patients may be controlled on twice a day administration and some even on once a day administration.

When trifluoperazine is administered by intramuscular injection, equivalent oral dosage may be substituted once symptoms have been controlled.

Dosage should be increased more gradually in elderly patients.

Dialysis

Data not available

Other Comments

Trifluoperazine injection is usually well tolerated and there is little, if any, pain and irritation at the site of injection.

The oral concentrate dose should be added to 60 mL (2 fluid oz.) or more of diluent just prior to administration to insure palatability and stability. Vehicles suggested for dilution of the oral concentrate include tomato or fruit juice, milk, simple syrup, orange syrup, carbonated beverages, coffee, tea, and water. Semisolid foods (soup, puddings, etc.) may also be used.

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