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Renal Cell Carcinoma Blog

Related terms: Adenocarcinoma of renal cells, Cancer, Hypernephroma, Cancer, Kidney, Cancer, Renal, Cancer, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Hypernephroma, Kidney Cancer, Renal Cancer

Targeted Drugs Among Successes Against Cancer, Says New Report

Posted 16 Sep 2014 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 16, 2014 – About 14.5 million U.S. cancer survivors are alive today, compared to just 3 million in 1971, the American Association for Cancer Research reported Tuesday. These individuals amount to 4 percent of the population and include nearly 380,000 survivors of childhood cancer, according to the association's annual progress report. The paper outlines advances in prevention, identification, research and treatment of cancer and details some of the challenges ahead. But these numbers can be somewhat misleading unless they take into account advances in identifying cancers earlier, said Dr. Otis Brawley, chief medical officer of the American Cancer Society. Survival rates refer to how long a person lives with cancer (including in remission) while mortality rates refer to the death rate, but survival will be longer if the cancer is found earlier, even if the person dies at ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Pancreatic Cancer, Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Endometrial Cancer, Stomach Cancer, Gastric Cancer, Ceritinib, Zykadia

Kidney and Thyroid Cancer Rates Up Among U.S. Children, Study Finds

Posted 8 Sep 2014 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 8, 2014 – Although the overall rate of cancer in American children and teens remained stable during the last decade, rates of thyroid cancer and kidney cancer seemed to be on the rise, a new study says. The rate of thyroid cancer saw annual increases of nearly 5 percent and a specific type of kidney cancer, called renal carcinoma, had average increases of 5.4 percent per year, according to the study. The researchers also found that cancer rates among black children and teens increased 1.3 percent per year. But one doctor not involved with the study said the finding could be a statistical "fluke." "It's scary to see an increase, but these cancers are overall very rare and the increases very small," said lead researcher Dr. David Siegel, a pediatric hematology/oncology fellow at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta. "We don't want to give a message that's alarming," he said. ... Read more

Related support groups: Renal Cell Carcinoma, Thyroid Cancer

New Cancer Classification System Might Boost Patient Outcomes

Posted 7 Aug 2014 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 7, 2014 – Changes to the way cancers are classified could lead to more accurate diagnoses and perhaps more effective treatments in about one in 10 cancer patients, new research suggests. Typically, cancers are categorized according to the tissue in which they originated, such as breast, bladder or kidney cancer. But tissues are composed of different types of cells. In this study, researchers who analyzed more than 3,500 tumor samples of 12 different cancer types concluded that defining tumors by their cellular and molecular features, rather than by the tissues in which they originated, would improve diagnoses in about 10 percent of cancer cases. "This genomic study not only challenges our existing system of classifying cancers based on tissue type, but also provides a massive new data resource for further exploration, as well as a comprehensive list of the molecular ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Bladder Cancer

Type of Kidney Disease May Dictate Cancer Risk

Posted 25 May 2014 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 22, 2014 – Cancer risk for kidney transplant recipients may vary depending on the type of kidney disease they have, a new study finds. Patients with polycystic kidney disease (PKD), a genetic disorder, may be less likely to develop cancer than those with other types of kidney disease, but they still have a higher cancer risk than people in the general population, the researchers found. In polycystic kidney disease, cysts form in the kidneys, causing the kidneys to become enlarged. The condition affects nearly one in 1,000 people in the United States. The research team analyzed data from more than 10,000 Americans with polycystic kidney disease who received a kidney transplant and more than 107,000 transplant recipients with other kidney diseases. After adjusting for a number of factors, the researchers concluded that patients with polycystic kidney disease were 16 percent ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Chronic Kidney Disease, Polycystic Kidney Disease

New Drug May Help Immune System Fight Cancer

Posted 16 May 2013 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, May 16 – An experimental drug that taps the power of the body's immune system to fight cancer is shrinking tumors in patients for whom other treatments have failed, an early study shows. The drug binds to a protein called PD-L1 that sits on the surface of cancer cells and makes them invisible to the immune system, almost like a cloaking device. "That [the protein] allows the tumor cell to grow unchecked and cause harm to the patient," said study author Dr. Roy Herbst, chief of medical oncology at Yale University. But with the protein blocked, the immune system can see and destroy cancer cells. Of 140 patients in the pilot safety study, 29 (or 21 percent) initially saw significant tumor shrinkage after at least three months on the medication. Researchers say 26 patients have continued to respond over time, including some who have been on the drug for more than a year. One ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Colorectal Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Melanoma, Gastric Cancer

Cholesterol Drugs Might Boost Kidney Cancer Survival

Posted 7 May 2013 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 7 – Cholesterol-lowering statin drugs that are taken by millions of Americans might also improve survival from a type of kidney cancer called renal cell carcinoma, a new study suggests. Statins – drugs such as Crestor, Lipitor, Pravachol and Zocor – have anti-inflammatory and cell self-destruction properties, and previous research has shown that these drugs may lower the risk of developing some types of cancer. The new research, presented Tuesday at the annual meeting of the American Urological Association in San Diego, suggests that the drugs might fight kidney cancer. "Given that one in four Americans over 45 years of age take a statin and renal cell carcinoma occurs most often in men ages 50 to 70, it may be prudent to prospectively evaluate if statins protect against [cancer] progression," study author Dr. Scott Eggener, an associate professor of urologic oncology at ... Read more

Related support groups: Lipitor, Simvastatin, Crestor, Pravastatin, Atorvastatin, Zocor, Lovastatin, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Rosuvastatin, Red Yeast Rice, Livalo, Pravachol, Lescol, Lescol XL, Mevacor, Baycol, Fluvastatin, Altoprev, Pitavastatin, Altocor

'Watch and Wait' Approach Often Best for Older Patients With Kidney Cancer

Posted 13 Feb 2013 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 12 – Sometimes, simply watching and waiting is a safe alternative to surgery for older patients with small kidney tumors, a new study suggests. "Physicians can comfortably tell an elderly patient, especially a patient that is not healthy enough to tolerate general anesthesia and surgery, that the likelihood of dying of kidney cancer is low and that kidney surgery is unlikely to extend their lives," study lead author Dr. William Huang, an assistant professor of urologic oncology at NYU Medical Center, said in a news release from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). The findings are to be presented Saturday at an ASCO conference in New York City. Research presented at medical meetings is typically considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal. In their study, Huang's team analyzed data from more than 8,300 patients aged 66 and older who were ... Read more

Related support groups: Renal Cell Carcinoma

Cancer Drug Doesn't Speed Up Tumor Growth, Researchers Say

Posted 7 Feb 2013 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 7 – The anticancer drug Sutent (sunitinib) does not cause tumors to grow faster after treatment ends, according to a new study. Previous research in animals suggested that tumor growth may accelerate after patients stopped taking Sutent. The new findings, from a study of kidney cancer patients, indicate that the drug does not pose lingering risks for humans. The researchers analyzed data from a phase 3 clinical trial that led to Sutent's approval. They concluded that regardless of how long patients took the drug, it did not cause harm, did not speed up tumor growth and survival was not shortened after treatment ended, according to the findings published online Feb. 7 in the journal Cell Reports. During treatment, Sutent slowed tumor growth and extended patients' lives, the investigators pointed out in a journal news release. Sutent, which is approved for the treatment of ... Read more

Related support groups: Renal Cell Carcinoma, Sutent, Sunitinib

Novel Drugs Show Early Promise Against Several Cancers

Posted 4 Jun 2012 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, June 2 – Two related "immunotherapy" drugs show early evidence of being able to thwart a variety of tough-to-treat, advanced cancers. About one-quarter of patients with advanced melanoma, kidney or lung cancer saw their tumors shrink when taking one of the two drugs, researchers reported Saturday. But the findings are extremely preliminary. Phase 1 studies such as this aren't designed to look at tumor shrinkage at all, but simply to establish dosage. And the therapies produced some serious side effects. While seeing results in a study such as this is "exciting," said Dr. Len Lichtenfeld, deputy chief medical officer at the American Cancer Society, "this was not the focus of the study." The two experimental drugs are antibodies that target two proteins in a key pathway of the immune system. "Cancers seem to have co-opted this pathway to enable them to fly below the radar of ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Lung Cancer, Skin Cancer, Melanoma

Kidney Cancer Patients Fare Better With Tumor Removal Only

Posted 17 Apr 2012 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 17 – Kidney cancer patients who have only the tumor removed, not the entire kidney, have higher survival rates, a new study finds. The research involved more than 7,000 Medicare patients with early-stage kidney cancer who underwent surgery to remove either the entire organ (radical nephrectomy) or only the tumor and a small margin of healthy tissue around it (partial nephrectomy). After an average follow-up of five years, 25 percent of patients who had a partial nephrectomy had died, compared with 42 percent of those who had a radical nephrectomy, researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center reported. The study appears in the April 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. "For patients who are candidates for partial nephrectomy, it should be the preferred treatment option. We found that patients who were younger or had ... Read more

Related support groups: Renal Cell Carcinoma

Immune-Based Drug Combo Might Extend Cancer Survival

Posted 2 Apr 2012 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 2 – Cancer patients who receive a combination of low-dose interleukin-2 and retinoic acid after conventional therapy seem to live longer than those who don't get the combination. These new study findings, slated for presentation this week at the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research in Chicago, were seen across individuals with many different forms of advanced malignancies, including breast, lung and colon cancers. Retinoic acid is derived from vitamin A. Interleukin-2, a compound that fortifies the immune system, is approved at high doses to treat "metastatic" melanoma and kidney cancer. Metastatic means that a cancer has spread. The study showed that "these biological compounds may work at low doses. Bigger doses are not always better," said lead author Dr. Francesco Recchia, director of the oncology department at Civilian Hospital in Avezzano, ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Pancreatic Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Melanoma, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Melanoma - Metastatic, Gastric Cancer

Inlyta Approved for Advanced Kidney Cancer

Posted 30 Jan 2012 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 27 – Inlyta (axitinib) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat advanced renal cell carcinoma in people who haven't responded to another drug. Renal cell carcinoma is a form of kidney cancer that begins in tissue that lines the kidney's small tubes. Inlyta blocks proteins that help fuel tumor growth in this area, the FDA said in a news release. Six medications had been sanctioned previously for advanced kidney cancer, the agency said. In a study of 723 people with the advanced form of kidney cancer, the most common side effects of Inlyta included diarrhea, high blood pressure, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, loss of voice, weight loss, weakness and constipation. Among some patients, Inlyta also caused significant bleeding, which in some cases proved fatal. The FDA also warned that people with high blood pressure should make sure the problem is ... Read more

Related support groups: Renal Cell Carcinoma

FDA Approves Inlyta for Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma

Posted 27 Jan 2012 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, January 27, 2012 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Inlyta (axitinib) to treat patients with advanced kidney cancer (renal cell carcinoma) who have not responded to another drug for this type of cancer. Renal cell carcinoma is a type of kidney cancer that starts in the lining of very small tubes in the kidney. Inlyta works by blocking certain proteins called kinases that play a role in tumor growth and cancer progression. Inlyta is a pill that patients take twice a day. “This is the seventh drug that has been approved for the treatment of metastatic or advanced kidney cell cancer since 2005,” said Richard Pazdur, M.D., director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “Collectively, this unprecedented level of drug development within this time period has significantly altered the treatment parad ... Read more

Related support groups: Renal Cell Carcinoma

Cancer Patients Should Ask Doctors to Use Simple Terms

Posted 28 Sep 2011 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 – Cancer patients are often faced with many difficult-to-understand treatment choices that can have serious side effects and even mean the difference between life and death. That's why it's crucial that patients insist doctors use plain language in explaining the options, advised Angela Fagerlin, an associate professor of internal medicine at the University of Michigan Medical School and a researcher at the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center. "People are making life and death decisions that may affect their survival and they need to know what they're getting themselves into. Cancer treatments and tests can be serious. Patients need to know what kind of side effects they might experience as a result of the treatment they undergo," Fagerlin said in a university news release. She and her colleagues outlined a number of tips to help patients get the information they need ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Provera, Methotrexate, Depo-Provera, Breast Cancer, Lupron, Accutane, Prostate Cancer, Tamoxifen, Medroxyprogesterone, Arimidex, Lupron Depot, Femara, Gleevec, Fluorouracil, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Lung Cancer, Tretinoin, Rituxan, Claravis

NSAID Painkillers Linked to Risk of Kidney Cancer

Posted 12 Sep 2011 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 12 – The long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as Advil, Motrin and Aleve may slightly increase the risk for developing kidney cancer, Harvard researchers report. Millions of people use these drugs regularly for pain and they have been associated with reducing the risk of some cancers, the researchers added. "NSAIDs have been associated with a reduced risk of several types of cancer, including colorectal, breast and prostate," said lead researcher Eunyoung Cho, an assistant professor of medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School. "Our study raises a contradicting possibility that non-aspirin NSAIDs may elevate the risk of certain types of cancer." "If our studies are confirmed, risks and benefits should be considered in deciding whether to use analgesics, especially for long duration," she added. The report was ... Read more

Related support groups: Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Meloxicam, Diclofenac, Advil, Voltaren, Mobic, Aleve, Motrin, Toradol, Indomethacin, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Etodolac, Nabumetone, Flector, Ketorolac, Arthrotec, Naprosyn, Relafen, Lodine

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