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Epinephrine use while Breastfeeding

Drugs containing Epinephrine: EpiPen, Adrenalin, EpiPen 2-Pak, Bronkaid Mist, Septocaine, EpiPen Auto-Injector, Glaucon, EpiPen Jr, Asthmahaler, Octocaine 100, Show all 59 »Xylocaine Dental, Adrenalin Chloride, Auvi-Q, Ana-Kit, Twinject Auto-Injector Two Pack, P2E1, Lignospan, Xylocaine with Epinephrine, Citanest Forte, Adrenaclick, EpiPen JR Auto-Injector, Vivacaine, Sensorcaine with Epinephrine, Epifrin, Xylocaine-MPF-Epinephrine, Xylocaine with Epinephrine Dental Cartridges, Xylocaine HCl with Epinephrine, E-Pilo-4, Lignospan Forte, P4E1, P3E1, P1E1, P6E1, E-Pilo-1, E-Pilo-6, E-Pilo-2, Lets Kit, LidoSite, Primatene Mist, Eppy/N, Epinal, Twinject, Ana-Guard, Marcaine HCl with Epinephrine, Sensorcaine-MPF with Epinephrine, Articadent, Orabloc, Zorcaine, Sus-Phrine Injection, Bronitin, EPIsnap, Adrenalin Topical, Raphon, Twinject Auto-Injector, EpiPen JR 2-Pak, Bronchial Mist with Pump, Epi EZ Pen, Medihaler-Epi, Duranest-MPF-Epinephrine

Epinephrine Levels and Effects while Breastfeeding

Summary of Use during Lactation

No information is available on the use of epinephrine during breastfeeding. Because of its poor oral bioavailability and short half-life, any epinephrine in milk is unlikely to affect the infant. High intravenous doses of epinephrine might reduce milk production or milk letdown. Low-dose epidural, topical, inhaled or ophthalmic epinephrine are unlikely to interfere with breastfeeding. To substantially diminish the effect of the drug after using eye drops, place pressure over the tear duct by the corner of the eye for 1 minute or more, then remove the excess solution with an absorbent tissue.

Drug Levels

Maternal Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Infant Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Effects in Breastfed Infants

Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Effects on Lactation and Breastmilk

Relevant published information in nursing mothers was not found as of the revision date. Intravenous epinephrine infusion in nonnursing subjects and in women with hyperprolactinemia decreases serum prolactin concentrations.[1] Animal data indicate that intraarterial epinephrine can decrease serum oxytocin and inhibit milk ejection.[2][3] However, low-dose infusion of epinephrine as part of epidural analgesia does not impair breastfeeding in nursing mothers.[4][5] The prolactin level in a mother with established lactation may not affect her ability to breastfeed.

References

1. Nicoletti I, Filipponi P, Sfrappini M et al. Catecholamines and pituitary function. I. Effects of catecholamine synthesis inhibition and subsequent catecholamine infusion on gonadotropin and prolactin serum levels in normal cycling women and in women with hyperprolactinemic amenorrhea. Horm Res. 1984;19:158-70. PMID: 6425187

2. Gorewit RC, Aromando MC. Mechanisms involved in the adrenalin-induced blockade of milk ejection in dairy cattle. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med. 1985;180:340-7. PMID: 4048172

3. Song SL, Crowley WR, Grosvenor CE. Evidence for involvement of an adrenal catecholamine in the beta-adrenergic inhibition of oxytocin release in lactating rats. Brain Res. 1988;457:303-9. PMID: 2851365

4. Radzyminski S. The effect of ultra low dose epidural analgesia on newborn breastfeeding behaviors. J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2003;32:322-31. PMID: 12774874

5. Chang ZM, Heaman MI. Epidural analgesia during labor and delivery: effects on the initiation and continuation of effective breastfeeding. J Hum Lact. 2005;21:305-14. PMID: 16113019

Epinephrine Identification

Substance Name

Epinephrine

CAS Registry Number

51-43-4

Drug Class

Adrenergic Agonists

Adrenergic alpha-Agonists

Adrenergic beta-Agonists

Antiglaucoma Agents

Bronchodilator Agents

Catecholamines

Mydriatics

Sympathomimetics

Vasoconstrictor Agents

Administrative Information

LactMed Record Number

742

Last Revision Date

20151001

Disclaimer

Information presented in this database is not meant as a substitute for professional judgment. You should consult your healthcare provider for breastfeeding advice related to your particular situation. The U.S. government does not warrant or assume any liability or responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of the information on this Site.

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