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Health Tip: Antihistamines Have Side Effects

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

-- Antihistamines can be effective in alleviating allergy symptoms, but they can also make you sleepy and cause other side effects. The American Academy of Family Physicians says possible side effects of antihistamines include: Drowsiness, which can affect the ability to safely drive a car or manage machinery. Difficulty thinking clearly. Dryness of the eyes and mouth. Headache. Abdominal pain. Read more

Related support groups: Benadryl, Promethazine, Zyrtec, Hydroxyzine, Claritin, Phenergan, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Loratadine, Vistaril, Atarax, Cetirizine, Chlorpheniramine, Fexofenadine, Xyzal, Periactin, Cyproheptadine, Levocetirizine, Benadryl Allergy, Clarinex

Study Finds Doctors Prescribing More Sedatives

Posted 7 Mar 2014 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 7, 2014 – Doctors in the United States are writing more prescriptions for sedatives than ever before, and the frequent use of these powerful drugs in combination with narcotic painkillers may be causing medication-related deaths, a new study suggests. Sedatives are used to treat problems such as anxiety, mood disorders and insomnia, and include drugs such as Valium, Halcion, Xanax, Ativan and Librium. For the study, researchers looked at 3.1 billion primary care visits made by Americans between 2002 and 2009, and found that 12.6 percent of those visits involved prescriptions for sedatives (benzodiazepines) or narcotic (opioid) painkillers. They also found that the number of prescriptions for sedatives increased 12.5 percent a year. Patients who received narcotic painkiller prescriptions were 4.2 times more likely to also have sedative prescriptions, and the number of ... Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Klonopin, Ambien, Valium, Ativan, Clonazepam, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, BuSpar, Benadryl, Diazepam, Hydroxyzine, Buspirone, Zolpidem, Melatonin, Temazepam, Diphenhydramine, Lunesta, Vistaril, Doxepin

Health Tip: When Food and Drugs Interact

Posted 27 Feb 2014 by Drugs.com

-- When food and drinks interact with medication, the medication may not work sufficiently or the drug can become too powerful as the body has trouble handling it properly. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics mentions these common examples of food and drug interaction: Grapefruit juice interacts with several drugs and may affect the way the body metabolizes medication. Drugs that may interact with grapefruit juice include: some statins, antihistamines, thyroid medications, blood pressure medications, birth control pills, cough suppressants and medications that block stomach acids. Blood-thinning medications can interact with leafy green vegetables, affecting the blood's clotting ability. Natural black licorice may interact with certain blood pressure medications and blood-thinning medications. Salt substitutes can interact with ACE inhibitors and digoxin. Tyramine (found in foods ... Read more

Related support groups: Hydrocodone, Plan B, Sprintec, Mirena, Codeine, Implanon, Provera, Tri-Sprintec, NuvaRing, Amlodipine, Yasmin, Loestrin 24 Fe, Ortho Tri-Cyclen, Depo-Provera, Lutera, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Benadryl, TriNessa, Promethazine

Health Tip: Possible Causes of Dry Eye

Posted 21 May 2013 by Drugs.com

-- You produce tears to help keep your eyes moist and protected from irritants. But dry eye can make your eyes vulnerable and uncomfortable. The National Eye Institute says possible causes of dry eye include: Certain medications, including birth control pills, antidepressants, antihistamines and blood pressure drugs. Diseases of the eye or nearby skin. Damage to the eye, such as from chemical exposure. Health conditions, such as thyroid problems, allergies or immune disorders. Irritation caused by use of contact lenses, or after LASIK surgery. Pregnancy, hormone replacement therapy or some homeopathic remedies. Not blinking frequently enough during use of a computer screen. Read more

Related support groups: Plan B, Sprintec, Mirena, Implanon, Provera, Tri-Sprintec, NuvaRing, Yasmin, Loestrin 24 Fe, Ortho Tri-Cyclen, Depo-Provera, Lutera, Benadryl, TriNessa, Promethazine, Ortho Evra, Mononessa, Zyrtec, Microgestin Fe 1/20, Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo

Is a Better Sleeping Pill on the Way?

Posted 3 Apr 2013 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 3 – A new class of sleep medications appears to help people fall asleep without causing grogginess the next day, researchers say. These new medications – known as dual orexin receptor antagonists (DORA) – target a more specific region of the brain than popular sleep drugs such as Ambien and Lunesta, promoting sleep without affecting learning and memory (also called "cognition"), according to the new research. "We've shown that these compounds improve sleep at doses that don't impact cognition," said Jason Uslaner, lead author of a study published in the April 3 issue of Science Translational Medicine. Uslaner is director of In Vivo Pharmacology at Merck & Co., which funded the study. Merck already has one such drug, suvorexant, under review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). More than 30 million Americans struggle to get a good night's sleep, and about ... Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Klonopin, Ambien, Valium, Ativan, Clonazepam, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, BuSpar, Benadryl, Diazepam, Hydroxyzine, Buspirone, Zolpidem, Melatonin, Temazepam, Diphenhydramine, Lunesta, Vistaril, Doxepin

Antihistamines Adding to Drug Pollution in Streams

Posted 2 Apr 2013 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 2 – Antihistamines and other medicines disrupt the ecosystems of streams, a new study finds. "Pharmaceutical pollution is now detected in waters throughout the world," lead author Emma Rosi-Marshall, a scientist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, N.Y., said in an institute news release. "Causes include aging infrastructure, sewage overflows and agricultural runoff. Even when wastewater makes it to sewage treatment facilities, they aren't equipped to remove pharmaceuticals." "As a result, our streams and rivers are exposed to a cocktail of synthetic compounds, from stimulants and antibiotics to analgesics and antihistamines," Rosi-Marshall said. The researchers examined how some common medicines affect similar-sized streams in New York, Maryland and Indiana. The medicines included the antibiotic ciprofloxacin, the diabetes drug metformin, two ... Read more

Related support groups: Metformin, Benadryl, Cipro, Ciprofloxacin, Diphenhydramine, Glucophage, Zantac, Ranitidine, Zantac 150, Glucophage XR, Benadryl Allergy, Tagamet, Simply Sleep, Cimetidine, Glumetza, Sominex, Zantac 75, Nytol, Q-Dryl, Diphen

Know What's in Your Child's Medications, FDA Warns

Posted 17 Mar 2013 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, March 17 – It's the time of year when cold season and allergy season overlap, and parents need to know the active ingredients in the medicines they give their children for these conditions, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns. Taking more than one medicine at a time could cause serious health problems if the drugs have the same active ingredient, which is the component that makes the medicine effective against a particular condition. For over-the-counter products, active ingredients are listed first on a medicine's Drug Facts label. For prescription medicines, active ingredients are listed in a patient package insert or consumer information sheet provided by the pharmacist, the FDA said. Many medicines have just one active ingredient. But combination medicines – such as those for allergy, cough or fever and congestion – may have more than one. Antihistamine is an ... Read more

Related support groups: Vicodin, Norco, Tylenol, Lortab, Acetaminophen, Ibuprofen, Benadryl, Advil, Zyrtec, Sta-D, Claritin, Fioricet, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Loratadine, Paracetamol, Pseudoephedrine, Darvocet-N 100, Motrin, Sudafed

Health Tip: Using an Antihistamine

Posted 11 Oct 2012 by Drugs.com

-- Antihistamines are medications used to prevent or treat allergy symptoms. Many of these medicines may be bought without a doctor's prescription. The American Academy of Family Physicians has issued these guidelines for people who take an over-the-counter antihistamine: Before you take an antihistamine, talk to your doctor if you have a chronic health condition, including heart disease, high blood pressure or thyroid disease. Before you take an antihistamine, talk to your doctor if you also take a sleeping pill, sedative or muscle relaxant. These other medicines may interact with an antihistamine. If you take an antihistamine that is combined with a decongestant or pain reliever, carefully check the label for potential interactions with your other medications. Be careful that you aren't taking more than one medication that contains an antihistamine. This could cause you to take more ... Read more

Related support groups: Benadryl, Promethazine, Zyrtec, Hydroxyzine, Claritin, Phenergan, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Loratadine, Vistaril, Atarax, Cetirizine, Chlorpheniramine, Fexofenadine, Xyzal, Periactin, Cyproheptadine, Levocetirizine, Benadryl Allergy, Clarinex

Another Drug 'Take-Back Day' Scheduled for Saturday

Posted 26 Apr 2012 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 26 – The fourth National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day is scheduled for Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration says. The event gives Americans an opportunity to safely dispose of unwanted and unused prescription drugs. At the third Take-Back Day last October, participants turned in more than 377,000 pounds (188.5 tons) of unwanted or expired medications at more than 5,300 sites located in all 50 states. In total, the three Take-Back Days have taken in nearly 1 million pounds of prescription drugs during the past 13 months. "The amount of prescription drugs turned in by the American public during the past three Take-Back Day events speaks volumes about the need to develop a convenient way to rid homes of unwanted or expired prescription drugs," DEA administrator Michele Leonhart said in an agency news release. "The DEA remains hard at ... Read more

Related support groups: Suboxone, Xanax, Oxycodone, Methadone, Adderall, Percocet, Hydrocodone, OxyContin, Vicodin, Morphine, Klonopin, Norco, Fentanyl, Lortab, Phentermine, Ambien, Valium, Ativan, Clonazepam, Vyvanse

Some People With Alzheimer's Take Conflicting Drugs

Posted 28 Oct 2011 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 28 – Many Alzheimer's patients who take cholinesterase inhibitors to slow their brain disease also take drugs that counter the effects of those Alzheimer's medications, a new study says. Clinical trials have shown that cholinesterase inhibitors such as Aricept (donepezil) have a modest impact on the functional and cognitive decline caused by Alzheimer's disease, noted the researchers at the Group Health Research Institute in Seattle. "Cholinesterase inhibitors are today's primary therapy for slowing Alzheimer's disease," study leader Denise Boudreau said in an institute news release. "Anticholinergic properties are often found in drugs commonly used to treat gastrointestinal disorders, allergies, urinary incontinence, depression and Parkinson's disease, and they can have negative effects on cognition and function in the elderly. There's concern that if someone is taking ... Read more

Related support groups: Benadryl, Diphenhydramine, Alzheimer's Disease, Aricept, Oxybutynin, Meclizine, Dramamine, Benztropine, Cogentin, Exelon, Donepezil, Scopolamine, Ditropan, Artane, Oxytrol, Benadryl Allergy, Trihexyphenidyl, Bonine, Antivert, Dimenhydrinate

Health Tip: Alcohol Can Interact With Medications

Posted 25 Oct 2011 by Drugs.com

-- Over-the-counter medications may seem safer because they don't require a prescription. But they can still interact badly when alcohol enters the mix. The American Academy of Family Physicians mentions these popular medications that may have adverse effects if mixed with alcohol: NSAID pain relievers, which may lead to gastrointestinal bleeding if taken while consuming as few as two alcoholic drink per week. Acetaminophen, which may cause liver damage when taken with alcohol. Some OTC antihistamines can make you drowsy when taken with alcohol. Decongestants and cough medications that contain the cough suppressant dextromethorphan can increase drowsiness when taken with alcohol. Herbal supplements, such as kava kava, St. John's wort or valerian root, may increase drowsiness if taken with alcohol. Read more

Related support groups: Percocet, Hydrocodone, Vicodin, Norco, Tylenol, Lortab, Codeine, Acetaminophen, Ibuprofen, Naproxen, Benadryl, Meloxicam, Promethazine, Advil, Diclofenac, Zyrtec, Voltaren, Hydroxyzine, Mobic, Claritin

Accidental Medication Poisonings in Kids on the Rise

Posted 16 Sep 2011 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 16 – Despite ongoing prevention efforts, a growing number of young children are being accidentally poisoned with medications, according to new research. The study, which was based on data reported to the American Association of Poison Control Centers between 2001 and 2008, found that medication poisoning among children aged 5 and under increased by 22 percent, although the number of children in the United States in this age group rose by only 8 percent during the study period. "The problem of pediatric poisoning in the U.S. is getting worse, not better," Dr. Randall Bond, of Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, said in a hospital news release. In conducting the study, which is scheduled for publication in the Journal of Pediatrics, the researchers reviewed information on over 544,000 children who landed in the emergency department due to medication poisoning ... Read more

Related support groups: Suboxone, Xanax, Oxycodone, Methadone, Percocet, Hydrocodone, OxyContin, Vicodin, Morphine, Klonopin, Lisinopril, Norco, Fentanyl, Lortab, Ambien, Valium, Ativan, Clonazepam, Codeine, Opana

FDA Bans Unapproved Prescription Cough, Cold and Allergy Meds

Posted 2 Mar 2011 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 2 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Wednesday that it plans to remove about 500 unapproved prescription cough, cold, and allergy medicines from pharmacy shelves. These drugs have not been evaluated by the FDA for safety and effectiveness, and they may be riskier to take than approved over-the-counter (OTC) drugs that treat these same conditions, agency officials explained. "This action is necessary to protect consumers from the potential risks posed by unapproved drugs, because we don't know what's in them, whether they work properly or how they are made," Deborah M. Autor, director of the agency's Office of Compliance at the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said during a morning news conference. Of particular concern are drugs that have time-release formulations, Autor said. "We know from experience that these type of products are complicated to ... Read more

Related support groups: Benadryl, Mucinex, Sta-D, Diphenhydramine, Pseudoephedrine, Sudafed, Cold Symptoms, Tylenol PM, Phenylephrine, NyQuil, Guaifenesin, Cheratussin AC, Mucinex DM, Dry Cough, Dextromethorphan, Chlorpheniramine, Robitussin, Claritin-D, Unisom, Mucinex D

Some People Can't Stomach the New 3-D Movies

Posted 8 Apr 2010 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 8 – The new crop of 3-D movies hitting theaters are making some people sick – literally. It's not the alien creatures bleeding off the screen or half-eaten humans spit out in your direction by fierce dragons. It's just the way 3-D plays tricks on your brain, mimicking symptoms of motion sickness. The problem, if you have one, may lie in your head and, in particular, your eyes, experts note. An unlucky (or lucky, depending on your point of view) 5 percent of the population have such bad eye coordination they can't perceive 3-D at all. But if these people decide to plunk down $20 for Avatar or Alice in Wonderland, at least they won't get a headache. "In 3-D movies, your eyes have to be working together as a team perfectly. You have to have equally clear images in both eyes," explained Dr. James J. Salz, spokesman for the American Academy of Ophthalmology and clinical ... Read more

Related support groups: Benadryl, Diphenhydramine, Meclizine, Dramamine, Motion Sickness, Scopolamine, Benadryl Allergy, Bonine, Dimenhydrinate, Antivert, Simply Sleep, Hydrate, Scopace, Transderm-Scop, Nytol, Cyclizine, Q-Dryl, Diphen, Marezine, Nightime Sleepaid

Psychotropic Medications Associated With Risk of Falls in Older Adults

Posted 1 Dec 2009 by Drugs.com

CHICAGO, Nov. 23, 2009 - Older adults who take several types of psychotropic medications—such as antidepressants or sedatives—appear more likely to experience falls, according to an analysis of previous studies reported in the November 23 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. More than 30 percent of individuals older than 65 will fall at least once a year, and falls and their complications are the fifth-leading cause of death in the developed world, according to background information in the article. Each year, 85 percent of all injury-related hospital admissions and more than 40 percent of nursing home admissions are related to falls, and the annual costs related to falls and their complications are estimated to be in the billions of dollars worldwide. Both internal and external risk factors contribute to falls, and medications have previously been i ... Read more

Related support groups: Xanax, Lexapro, Zoloft, Cymbalta, Wellbutrin, Effexor, Prozac, Klonopin, Celexa, Paxil, Ambien, Trazodone, Valium, Ativan, Clonazepam, Citalopram, Pristiq, Amitriptyline, Effexor XR, Lorazepam

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Insomnia, Allergic Reactions, Extrapyramidal Reaction, Hives, Urticaria, Cough, Cold Symptoms, Pruritus, Hay Fever, Allergic Rhinitis, Nausea/Vomiting, Motion Sickness

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