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Atgard Swine Wormer

This page contains information on Atgard Swine Wormer for veterinary use.
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Atgard Swine Wormer

This treatment applies to the following species:
Manufacturer: Boehringer Ingelheim

(dichlorvos)

For the removal and control of the sexually mature (adult), sexually immature, and/or 4th stage larvae of the whipworm (Trichuris suis), nodular worms (Oesophagostomum sp.), large roundworm (Ascaris suum) and the mature thick stomach worm (Ascarops stongylina) occurring in the lumen of the gastro-intestinal tract of pigs, boars, and open or bred gilts and sows.

Active Ingredient

The packet contains 0.40 oz of dichlorvos (2,2-dichlorovinyl dimethyl phosphate) in a stabilized polyvinyl chloride/plasticizer resin pellet.

Nada 043-606, Approved By Fda

For Use In Animals Only

Description

Atgard® is a broad-spectrum swine anthelmintic (dewormer) in the form of non-digestible, rice shaped resin pellets impregnated with the active ingredient dichlorvos.

The preparation is an uncoated, rice-shaped resin pellet, approximating one-eighth inch in length and one-sixteenth inch in diameter, the active ingredient of which is dichlorvos (2, 2-dichlorovinyl dimethyl phosphate). It is designed to be administered to swine in limited amounts of a meal-type (non-pelleted) ration. When used according to directions, the active ingredient (dichlorvos) release rate is sufficient to provide for high anthelmintic efficiency but not of such magnitude as to exceed the degrading (detoxification) capacity of the pig. This characteristic provides a wide margin of safety comparable to or exceeding many drugs used in the field of animal health.

Anthelmintic Spectrum And Activity

Common Name

Scientific Name

Developmental Stages Shown Susceptible To Dichlorvos

Roundworm

Ascaris suum

Sexually mature (a), sexually immature (b), and/or 4th stage larvae (c)

Nodular Worms

Oesophagostomum sp.

Sexually mature (a), sexually immature (b), and/or 4th stage larvae (c)

Whipworm

Trichuris suis

Sexually mature (a), sexually immature (b), and/or 4th stage larvae (c)

Stomach Worm

Ascarops strongylina

Sexually mature (a)

(a) Full sized parasite; produces eggs

(b) Sometimes called 5th stage larvae, incapable of egg production

(c) Minute in size, much too young for egg production.

Table One (1) illustrates the preparation’s efficacy against sexually immature and/or 4th stage larvae of the roundworm, nodular worms, and whipworm respectively in naturally infected pigs individually treated with the recommended dose in feed. In all trials, the anthelmintic efficacy was well over ninety percent (90%).

Table 1

Ref.

No. Pigs

Avg. Body Weight (lbs.)

Worms Eliminated/worms At Necropsy (percent Efficacy)

Roundworms

Nodular Worms

Whipworms

1

64

31.8

410/0 (100%)

66/4 (94.3%)

1,693/9 (99.5%)

2

6

46.5

69/0 (100%)

63/0 (100%)

119/7 (94.4%)

9

98

36.9

652/13 (98%)

826/55 (93.8%)

1,545/9 (99.4%)

Table Two (2) illustrates the preparation’s efficacy against sexually mature adults of the roundworm, nodular worms, whipworm and stomach worm respectively in naturally infected pigs individually treated with the recommended dose in feed. The anthelmintic efficacy in all trials was consistently greater than ninety-seven (97%).

Table 2

Ref.

No. Pigs

Avg. Body Weight (lbs.)

Worms Eliminated/worms At Necropsy (percent Efficacy)

Roundworms

Nodular Worms

Whipworms

Stomach Worms

1

64

31.8

723/7 (99%)

1,955/45 (97.8%)

13,006/51 (99.6%)

5/0 (100%)

9

98

36.9

423/10 (97.7%)

525/9 (98.3%)

1,259/18 (98.6%)

738/0 (100%)

Table Three (3) illustrates the ability of Atgard Swine Wormer (dichlorvos) to reduce the fecal parasite egg counts in breeding swine, thus helping to minimize premise contamination. When Atgard Swine Wormer is used as part of a regular parasite treatment program in young growing pigs and in breeding stock on a given farm, it becomes an important management factor by gradually lowering the overall parasite exposure rate and subsequent infection levels.

Table 3

Effects Of Atgard Swine Wormer On Fecal Passage Of Parasite Eggs When Given To Breeding Stock

Breeding Class

Trial Location No.

Total No. Animals

Avg. Body Weight (lbs.)

Results Of Individual Fecal Examinations For Parasite Eggs

Roundworms

Nodular Worms

Whipworms

No. Infected

No. Cleared

No. Infected

No. Cleared

No. Infected

No. Cleared

Gilts

1

25

350

25

25

0

-

2

2

Gilts

3

2

400

0

-

2

2

0

-

Gilts

2

24

275

12

12

6

6

17

17

Gilts

5

43

300

37

36

28

23

0

-

Sows

2

53

400

1

1

53

53

0

-

Sows

3

4

400

1

1

4

3

0

-

Sows

5

26

400

8

8

21

21

0

-

Sows

10

24

275

24

24

24

24

24

24

Boars

5

5

400

4

4

4

4

0

-

Boar

1

1

375

1

1

0

-

0

-

TOTALS (all locations)

113

112

142

136

43

43

Parasites And Herd Health

Whipworms, nodular worms, large roundworms and stomach worms do not cause death in pigs unless present in very large numbers. Seldom do pigs harbor a single species, thus the infections are usually mixed. Under modern methods of swine production (concentration and confinement), unless control measures are taken, each group of pigs tend to harbor more worms than its ancestors. These infections adversely affect herd health and performance as follows:

1. Chronic blood loss.

2. Tissue destruction (especially during migratory stages of roundworms).

3. Chronic and sometimes severe inflammation of the intestinal lining.

4. Blockage of secretory ducts (liver, pancreas).

5. Reduced absorptive capacity of the gastro-intestinal tract.

6. Toxin production and release.

7. Enhancement of other diseases.

Improved growth rates, feed efficiency and general herd health have been observed following the use of formulated dichlorvos. The best opportunity for receiving such benefits will be afforded by treating pigs as early in life as is practical, i.e., five (5) to six (6) weeks of age and again four (4) to five (5) weeks later. Additional treatments to feeder pigs may be dictated by extreme re-exposure rates on the premises and other management practices which favor rapid parasite development.

Gilts, sows and boars should not be ignored in a general parasite control program. These animals can serve as constant sources of infective eggs and larvae. To minimize contamination from the breeding stock, it is recommended to treat these animals routinely one (1) week prior to breeding and again one (1) week prior to farrowing.

Clear economic responses will not always be obtained by the use of the product. Variablility in such responses will be directly related to the degree of dichlorovs-sensitive parasite populations present in the treated animals.

Toxicology And Reproduction

Extensive field and laboratory trials with various formulations of dichlorvos have shown that the preparation, as recommended, is safe to use. The wide margin of safety is comparable to or exceeds most drugs used in the field of animal health.

Atgard Swine Wormer Given At The Recommended Dosages To Breeding Swine Has Been Shown Not To Have Any Adverse Effects On Production. It Does Not Cause Abortion Or Premature Births, Impaired Fertility, Fewer Pigs Per Litter, Or Decreased Litter Survival Or Performance.

parasite Control

Push-button swine parasite control is the dream of some, but it is yet to be accomplished. One is working with an animal that has been thousands of years in the making and a host-parasite relationship that has come about over eons (geological ages) of adjustment. The parasite’s life is one of a large income without work, security without effort and protection without fear. In order to perpetuate this type of life, nature has amply provided mechanisms to ensure continuation of the species. The primary mechanism is concerned with massive egg production and the ability of these eggs to remain infective under a variety of conditions.

In order to obtain the maximum benefits from the Atgard preparation, the following general points will be helpful.

1. Establish or maintain proper nutrition, care, housing and sanitation.

2. Worm control is similar to weed control - never let a parasite go to seed.

3. Consider every pig as an individual and meet its needs.

a. Provide adequate feeder space.

b. Separate small pigs from larger pigs and treat both lots separately.

c. Follow dosage directions.

d. Estimate the weights of pigs correctly.

e. Remove normal rations before initiating treatment.

f. Do not treat pigs with an appetite impaired due to disease. Correct the deficiency by proper treatment first.

g. Do not treat pigs showing signs of increased peristalsis (scours, diarrhea). Correct with proper therapy and then treat for worm removal.

1. Treat pigs as early in life as is practical, i.e., five (5) to six (6) weeks of age and repeat the treatment four (4) to five (5) weeks later.

2. Treat sows seven (7) to ten (10) days before breeding and farrowing. In the Midwest where nodular worms are a problem the infective eggs do not survive freezing. Carrier sows maintain infection from season to season. The treatment of sows during the winter months will minimize warm season contamination rates.

3. Frequently consult your practicing veterinarian, extension specialist, or university parasitologist on how to best meet special parasite control needs.

Use Directions

The preparation is designed to be mixed into a dry meal or crumble-type rations. The product cannot be adequately mixed into pelleted feeds nor should it be used in liquid or semi-liquid rations. The contents of the two (2) packet sizes provide for a single anthelmintic treatment for the number of pigs in various weight classes and for breeding swine as follows:

Pig Dosage Table

Pig Weight (lbs)

Number of Pigs/Packet

Pounds Feed/Packet

Pounds Feed/Pig

20-30

60

20

0.33

31-40

45

25

0.56

41-60

30

30

1.00

61-80

25

25

1.00

81-100

20

20

1.00

Adult Gilts, Sows, Boars

20

80

4.00

To incorporate in the ration, open packet(s), pour the contents on the feed and mix thoroughly on a clean, impervious surface.

Administer medicated feed shortly after mixing. Do not allow swine access to feed other than that containing the preparation until the treatment is complete, after which normal feeding should be resumed. Preconditioning swine by overnight fasting is not necessary nor recommended. Do not treat swine with signs of increased peristalsis (diarrhea, scours) until these signs subside or are brought under control by proper medication. Consult a veterinarian for assistance in the diagnosis, treatment and control of parasitism.

In feeder pigs, the best results will be obtained by treating at five (5) to six (6) weeks of age on an individual litter basis, prior to the time when dichlorvos-sensitive gastro-intestinal nematodes have had the opportunity to reach full egg-laying potential. Repeating the treatment four (4) to five (5) weeks later will afford the maximum anthelmintic value from the product and will help to minimize premise contamination. The utilization of specially constructed pens which are used only for deworming purposes and that can be thoroughly cleaned after each use will further reduce such contamination.

In those instances where lots of pigs of mixed sizes are to be treated, maximum anthelmintic efficiency will be obtained by segregating comparable sized pigs into individual lots.

In gilts and sows, optimum results will be obtained by treatment approximately one (1) week in advance of breeding and farrowing. Preferably these treatments should be given away from the farrowing and nursing areas.

Example

Separate similar sized pigs into individual lots or pens for treatment.

Do not allow swine access to feed other than that containing Atgard Swine Wormer. Waterers do not have to be shut off. Normal feeding should be resumed after the treatment is completed. Do not store unused feed containing Atgard Swine Wormer.

Warning

Do not store unused packet(s) contents or medicated feed. Unused contents and feed containing Atgard Swine Wormer should be buried 18 inches deep in the ground and covered in a manner rendering it unavailable to man, animals, or fowl. Avoid contact with the skin. Keep out of the reach of children. Do not use in any animals other than swine. Do not allow fowl access to feed containing the preparation or to manure from treated animals. Atgard Swine Wormer (dichlorvos) is a cholinesterase inhibitor. Do not use this product on animals simultaneously or within a few days before or after treatment with or exposure to cholinesterase inhibiting drugs, pesticides or chemicals.

If human or animal poisoning should occur, immediately consult a physician or veterinarian respectively. Atropine is antidotal.

Store At Less Than 80°f.

There is no pre-slaughter withdrawal period when used at the recommended dosage level.

Atgard® is a Registered Trademark of Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc.

Product Information

Code

Size

610-711

Net Wt. 1.92 oz (54.6 g)

610701F-01-9909

Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc., St. Joseph, MO 64506 U.S.A.

Nac No.

10280061
BOEHRINGER INGELHEIM VETMEDICA, INC.
2621 NORTH BELT HIGHWAY, ST. JOSEPH, MO, 64506-2002
Telephone:   800-325-9167
Fax:   816-236-2717
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Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the Atgard Swine Wormer information published above. However, it remains the responsibility of the readers to familiarize themselves with the product information contained on the US product label or package insert.

Copyright © 2014 North American Compendiums. Updated: 2014-07-28

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