I would have to agree with Dave. It would be the epitomy of brain-washing![}] I believe if they attain a certain level of enlightenment of alieness such as the incredible Tom Cruise; they soon shed their skin and become reptiles. Then they roam the earth and star in lots of sci-fi films like John Travolta in 'Battlefield Earth' and the newest by Tom Cruise, 'War of the Worlds'. [xx(]

Lafayette Ronald Hubbard [}](March 13, 1911 – January 24, 1986), better known as L. Ron Hubbard, was a prolific and controversial American author and the founder of Dianetics and Scientology. In addition to philosophical works and self-help books, he wrote fiction in several genres, business management texts, essays and poetry.

The Church of Scientology has produced numerous biographical publications that make extraordinary claims about his life and career; many of those claims are disputed by journalists and critics. However, there is general agreement about the basic facts of Hubbard's life.

During the 1920s, Hubbard travelled twice to the Far East to visit his parents during his father's posting to the United States Navy base on the island of Guam. He attended the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at the George Washington University in Washington, DC between 1930–1932. In 1931, he was placed on probation for deficiency in scholarship and did not complete the program. <--Oh darn now what should I do...how bout make a lot of money by scamming people and writing sci-fi novels?

Hubbard instead pursued fiction writing, publishing many stories and novellas in pulp magazines during the 1930s [2]. He became a well known author in the science fiction and fantasy genres, and he also wrote westerns and adventure stories. Critics often cite "Final Blackout", set in a war-ravaged future Europe, and "Fear", a psychological horror story, as among the best examples of Hubbard's pulp fiction.

Hubbard married Margaret "Polly" Grubb in 1933, with whom he fathered two children, L. Ron, Jr. (1934–1991) and Katherine May (born 1936). They lived in Bremerton, Washington during the late 1930s, during which time Hubbard supported his family through his fiction writing.

L. Ron Hubbard's past is embroiled in controversy, as is the history of Scientology (for more on that, see the Wikipedia article Scientology controversy). His son, L. Ron Hubbard, Jr. claimed in 1983 that "99% of what my father ever wrote or said about himself is totally untrue".

Some documents written by Hubbard himself appear to suggest that he regarded Scientology as primarily a business, not a religion. In one letter dated April 10 1953, he says that calling Scientology a religion solves "a problem of practical business", and status as a religion achieves something "more equitable...with what we've got to sell". In a 1962 official policy letter, he said "Scientology 1970 is being planned on a religious organization basis throughout the world. This will not upset in any way the usual activities of any organization. It is entirely a matter for accountants and solicitors." [11].

A Reader's Digest article of May 1980 quoted Hubbard as saying in the 1940s "Writing for a penny a word is ridiculous. If a man really wants to make a million dollars, the best way would be to start his own religion."

"Scientology is a power-and-money-and-intelligence-gathering game" and described his father as "only interested in money, sex, booze, and drugs".

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