Trimethobenzamide Dosage

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Usual Adult Dose for:

Usual Pediatric Dose for:

Additional dosage information:

Usual Adult Dose for Nausea/Vomiting

Trimethobenzamide in suppository form was voluntarily withdrawn from the US market by the manufacturer in April, 2007 due to a lack of evidence of effectiveness. The following dosage information for the suppository form applies to when the drug was available in the U.S.

orally: 250 to 300 mg 3 to 4 times a day.
IM: 200 mg 3 to 4 times a day.
rectally: 200 mg suppository 3 to 4 times a day.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Nausea/Vomiting

Trimethobenzamide in suppository form was voluntarily withdrawn from the US market by the manufacturer in April, 2007 due to a lack of evidence of effectiveness. The following dosage information for the suppository form applies to when the drug was available in the U.S.

Child less than 30 lbs: 100 mg orally or rectally 3 to 4 times a day.

Child 30 to 90 lbs: 100 to 200 mg orally or rectally 3 to 4 times a day.

Renal Dose Adjustments

CrCl less than or equal to 70 mL/min: dose adjustment such as reducing the total dose administered at each dosing or increasing the dosing interval should be considered

Liver Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Precautions

Patients should be warned of the sedative effects of trimethobenzamide and should be advised not to take this drug with alcohol.

Neurologic reactions resulting from trimethobenzamide use may be similar to signs and symptoms accompanying such disorders as acute febrile illness, encephalitis, Reye's syndrome, gastroenteritis, dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. This drug should be used with caution in patients who have such disorders, especially in children and the elderly or debilitated.

The antiemetic effects of trimethobenzamide may make the diagnosis of conditions such as appendicitis and drug overdose more difficult.

Overhydrating patients on trimethobenzamide should be avoided since it may result in cerebral edema.

Trimethobenzamide injection is intended for intramuscular administration only.

Dialysis

Data not available

Other Comments

Injectable trimethobenzamide should NOT be administered intravenously.

Trimethobenzamide may cause drowsiness and may impair a persons ability to operate machinery.

The manufacturer recommends giving trimethobenzamide by deep injection into the upper outer quadrant of the gluteal region, and avoiding the escape of the injectable solution along the route, in order to reduce the incidence of side effects at the injection site.

Patients should be advised about that the suppository contains an ester type anesthetic.

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