Pyridoxine Dosage

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Usual Adult Dose for:

Usual Pediatric Dose for:

Additional dosage information:

Usual Adult Dose for Drug Induced Vitamin/Mineral Deficiency

Drug Induced Neuritis:
Cycloserine: 100 to 300 mg/day orally in divided doses.
Isoniazid or penicillamine: 100 to 200 mg/day orally for 3 weeks or 25 to 100 mg/day for prophylaxis.
Oral contraceptives: 25 to 30 mg/day orally.

Acute Intoxication:
Hydralazine: 25 mg/kg. One-third of the dose should be administered IM and the remainder administered as an IV infusion over 3 hours.
Isoniazid: 1 to 4 grams IV as a first dose, then 1 g IM every 30 minutes until the total required dose has been administered (given with other anticonvulsants as needed). The total dose administered should equal the amount of isoniazid ingested.
Mushroom ingestion (genus Gyromitra): 25 mg/kg IV infused over 15 to 30 minutes. Repeat as needed to a maximum total daily dose of 15 to 20 g.

Usual Adult Dose for Dietary Supplement

Pyridoxine Deficiency:
10 to 25 mg/day orally, IM, or IV for 3 weeks followed by 2 to 5 mg/day from a multivitamin product.

Usual Adult Dose for Anemia

Sideroblastic, hereditary: 200 to 600 mg orally daily. If adequate response obtained, dose may be decreased to 30 to 50 mg orally daily.

If therapeutic response is not obtained after 1 to 2 months of pyridoxine therapy, a different therapy should be considered.

Usual Adult Dose for Nausea/Vomiting

Nausea and vomiting of Pregnancy:
25 mg orally every 8 hours.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Drug Induced Vitamin/Mineral Deficiency

Drug Induced Neuritis (cycloserine, isoniazid, hydralazine, penicillamine) :
Treatment: 10 to 50 mg/day.
Prophylaxis: 1 to 2 mg/kg/day

Acute Intoxication:

Hydralazine: 25 mg/kg: One-third of the dose should be administered IM and the remainder administered as an IV infusion over 3 hours.

Isoniazid: Acute ingestion of known amount: Initial: A total dose of pyridoxine equal to the amount of isoniazid ingested (maximum dose: 70 mg/kg, up to 5 g); administer at a rate of 0.5 to 1 g/minute until seizures stop or the maximum initial dose has been administered; may repeat every 5 to 10 minutes as needed to control persistent seizure activity and/or CNS toxicity. If seizures stop prior to the administration of the calculated initial dose, infuse the remaining pyridoxine over 4 to 6 hours. Acute ingestion of unknown amount: Initial: 70 mg/kg (maximum dose: 5 g); administer at a rate of 0.5 to 1 g/minute; may repeat every 5 to 10 minutes as needed to control persistent seizure activity and/or CNS toxicity.

Mushroom ingestion (genus Gyromitra): 25 mg/kg IV. Repeat as needed up to a maximum total dose of 15 to 20 g.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Dietary Supplement

Pyridoxine Deficiency:
5 to 25 mg/day orally, IM, or IV for 3 weeks followed by 1.5 to 2.5 mg/day from a multivitamin product.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Seizures

Pyridoxine-dependent seizures:
10 to 100 mg PO, IM, or IV initially, followed by 2 to 100 mg orally daily.

Renal Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Liver Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Precautions

Drug dependence has been reported in patients withdrawn from the drug at doses of 200 mg per day.

Pyridoxine should not be administered intravenously to patients with heart disease.

Sensory neuropathy with axonal degeneration has been reported following a single large dose of pyridoxine (10 g) administered intravenously. It may rarely occur following chronic administration of lower doses.

Dialysis

Data not available

Other Comments

Administer parenteral pyridoxine by slow IV push.

When administering large parenteral doses, the patients heart rate, respiratory rate and blood pressure should be monitored closely.

Oral pyridoxine may be given with or without food.

Urinary excretion of 4-pyridoxic acid <0.1 mg/24 hours is suggestive of a deficiency.

Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) is found in meat, liver, whole-grain breads and cereals, soybeans, vegetables, eggs, peanuts, walnuts, and corn.

Average Adequate Intake (AI) in Adults:
>=19 to 50 years: 1.3 mg/day

>=51 years:
Men: 1.7 mg/day
Women: 1.5 mg/day

Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) in Pediatrics:
1 to 3 years: 0.5 mg/day
4 to 8 years: 0.6 mg/day

Average Adequate Intake (AI) in Pediatrics:
0 to 6 months: 0.1 mg/day

7 to 12 months: 0.3 mg/day

9 to 13 years: 1 mg/day

Males:
>=14 years: 1.3 mg/day

Female:
>=14 years: 1.2 mg/day

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