Dexamethasone Ophthalmic Dosage

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Usual Adult Dose for:

Usual Pediatric Dose for:

Additional dosage information:

Usual Adult Dose for Iritis

For steroid responsive inflammatory ocular conditions:
Solution: For severe conditions, initially instill 1 to 2 drops in the lower conjunctival sac up to every hour during the day and every 2 hours during the night. Once improvement is observed, dosage may be decreased to 1 drop every 3 to 4 hours, then 1 drop 3 to 4 times daily.

Suspension: For severe conditions, instill 1 to 2 drops in the lower conjunctival sac up to every hour. Once improvement is observed, dosage may be decreased to 4 to 6 times daily, and gradually reduced further until discontinuation.

Ointment: Apply small amount to the conjunctiva 3 to 4 times a day. Once improvement is observed, may gradually reduce frequency before discontinuation.

Usual Adult Dose for Keratitis

For steroid responsive inflammatory ocular conditions:
Solution: For severe conditions, initially instill 1 to 2 drops in the lower conjunctival sac up to every hour during the day and every 2 hours during the night. Once improvement is observed, dosage may be decreased to 1 drop every 3 to 4 hours, then 1 drop 3 to 4 times daily.

Suspension: For severe conditions, instill 1 to 2 drops in the lower conjunctival sac up to every hour. Once improvement is observed, dosage may be decreased to 4 to 6 times daily, and gradually reduced further until discontinuation.

Ointment: Apply small amount to the conjunctiva 3 to 4 times a day. Once improvement is observed, may gradually reduce frequency before discontinuation.

Usual Adult Dose for Conjunctivitis

For steroid responsive inflammatory ocular conditions:
Solution: For severe conditions, initially instill 1 to 2 drops in the lower conjunctival sac up to every hour during the day and every 2 hours during the night. Once improvement is observed, dosage may be decreased to 1 drop every 3 to 4 hours, then 1 drop 3 to 4 times daily.

Suspension: For severe conditions, instill 1 to 2 drops in the lower conjunctival sac up to every hour. Once improvement is observed, dosage may be decreased to 4 to 6 times daily, and gradually reduced further until discontinuation.

Ointment: Apply small amount to the conjunctiva 3 to 4 times a day. Once improvement is observed, may gradually reduce frequency before discontinuation.

Usual Adult Dose for Cyclitis

For steroid responsive inflammatory ocular conditions:
Solution: For severe conditions, initially instill 1 to 2 drops in the lower conjunctival sac up to every hour during the day and every 2 hours during the night. Once improvement is observed, dosage may be decreased to 1 drop every 3 to 4 hours, then 1 drop 3 to 4 times daily.

Suspension: For severe conditions, instill 1 to 2 drops in the lower conjunctival sac up to every hour. Once improvement is observed, dosage may be decreased to 4 to 6 times daily, and gradually reduced further until discontinuation.

Ointment: Apply small amount to the conjunctiva 3 to 4 times a day. Once improvement is observed, may gradually reduce frequency before discontinuation.

Usual Adult Dose for Acute Otitis Externa

Instill 3 to 4 drops in the affected ear 2 to 3 times a day. Dosage may be reduced gradually as symptoms improve.

Alternatively, a cotton wick may be saturated with the solution or suspension and inserted into the ear canal. The wick should be kept moist with the ear drops and replaced every 12 to 24 hours.

Usual Adult Dose for Uveitis

For the treatment of macular edema following branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) or central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) and for the treatment of noninfectious uveitis affecting the posterior segment of the eye:

1 implant, containing 0.7 mg of dexamethasone, to be surgically injected into the vitreous cavity of the affected eye.

Usual Adult Dose for Macular Edema

For the treatment of macular edema following branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) or central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) and for the treatment of noninfectious uveitis affecting the posterior segment of the eye:

1 implant, containing 0.7 mg of dexamethasone, to be surgically injected into the vitreous cavity of the affected eye.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Iritis

1 year or older: For steroid responsive inflammatory ocular conditions:
Solution: For severe conditions, initially instill 1 to 2 drops in the lower conjunctival sac up to every hour during the day and every 2 hours during the night. Once improvement is observed, dosage may be decreased to 1 drop every 3 to 4 hours, then 1 drop 3 to 4 times daily.

Suspension: For severe conditions, instill 1 to 2 drops in the lower conjunctival sac up to every hour. Once improvement is observed, dosage may be decreased to 4 to 6 times daily, and gradually reduced further until discontinuation.

Ointment: Apply small amount to the conjunctiva 3 to 4 times a day. Once improvement is observed, may gradually reduce frequency before discontinuation.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Keratitis

1 year or older: For steroid responsive inflammatory ocular conditions:
Solution: For severe conditions, initially instill 1 to 2 drops in the lower conjunctival sac up to every hour during the day and every 2 hours during the night. Once improvement is observed, dosage may be decreased to 1 drop every 3 to 4 hours, then 1 drop 3 to 4 times daily.

Suspension: For severe conditions, instill 1 to 2 drops in the lower conjunctival sac up to every hour. Once improvement is observed, dosage may be decreased to 4 to 6 times daily, and gradually reduced further until discontinuation.

Ointment: Apply small amount to the conjunctiva 3 to 4 times a day. Once improvement is observed, may gradually reduce frequency before discontinuation.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Conjunctivitis

1 year or older: For steroid responsive inflammatory ocular conditions:
Solution: For severe conditions, initially instill 1 to 2 drops in the lower conjunctival sac up to every hour during the day and every 2 hours during the night. Once improvement is observed, dosage may be decreased to 1 drop every 3 to 4 hours, then 1 drop 3 to 4 times daily.

Suspension: For severe conditions, instill 1 to 2 drops in the lower conjunctival sac up to every hour. Once improvement is observed, dosage may be decreased to 4 to 6 times daily, and gradually reduced further until discontinuation.

Ointment: Apply small amount to the conjunctiva 3 to 4 times a day. Once improvement is observed, may gradually reduce frequency before discontinuation.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Cyclitis

1 year or older: For steroid responsive inflammatory ocular conditions:
Solution: For severe conditions, initially instill 1 to 2 drops in the lower conjunctival sac up to every hour during the day and every 2 hours during the night. Once improvement is observed, dosage may be decreased to 1 drop every 3 to 4 hours, then 1 drop 3 to 4 times daily.

Suspension: For severe conditions, instill 1 to 2 drops in the lower conjunctival sac up to every hour. Once improvement is observed, dosage may be decreased to 4 to 6 times daily, and gradually reduced further until discontinuation.

Ointment: Apply small amount to the conjunctiva 3 to 4 times a day. Once improvement is observed, may gradually reduce frequency before discontinuation.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Acute Otitis Externa

1 year or older:
Instill 3 to 4 drops in the affected ear 2 to 3 times a day. Dosage may be reduced gradually as symptoms improve.

Alternatively, a cotton wick may be saturated with the solution or suspension and inserted into the ear canal. The wick should be kept moist with the ear drops and replaced every 12 to 24 hours.

Renal Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Liver Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Precautions

Remove contact lenses before ocular administration of the solution/suspension and wait at least 15 minutes before reinserting them.

Dialysis

Data not available

Other Comments

Administration advice: The intravitreal injection should be used under controlled aseptic conditions. Adequate anesthesia and a broad-spectrum microbicide should be applied to the periocular skin, eyelid, and ocular surface prior to the injection.

Monitoring for: Elevation in intraocular pressure and endophthalmitis following intravitreal injection by:
-Checking for perfusion of the optic nerve head immediately after injection
-Tonometry within 30 minutes following injection
-Biomicroscopy between two and seven days following injection

Patient advice: Patients may experience temporary visual burning after receiving an intravitreal injection and should not drive or use machinery until symptoms have been resolved. Patients should be instructed to report any symptoms suggestive of endophthalmitis without delay.

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