Chloroquine Dosage

This dosage information may not include all the information needed to use Chloroquine safely and effectively. See additional information for Chloroquine.

The information at Drugs.com is not a substitute for medical advice. ALWAYS consult your doctor or pharmacist.

Usual Adult Dose for:

Usual Pediatric Dose for:

Additional dosage information:

Usual Adult Dose for Malaria Prophylaxis

500 mg chloroquine phosphate (300 mg base) orally on the same day each week starting 2 weeks prior to exposure

If unable to start 2 weeks before exposure, an initial loading dose of 1 g chloroquine phosphate (600 mg base) may be taken orally in 2 divided doses, 6 hours apart.

Suppressive therapy should continue for 8 weeks after leaving the endemic area.

Usual Adult Dose for Malaria

Chloroquine-sensitive uncomplicated malaria (Plasmodium species or species not identified):
60 kg or more: 1 g chloroquine phosphate (600 mg base) orally at once, followed by 500 mg chloroquine phosphate (300 mg base) orally at 6, 24, and 48 hours; represents a total dose of 2.5 g chloroquine phosphate (1.5 g base) in 3 days

Less than 60 kg: 16.7 mg chloroquine phosphate/kg (10 mg base/kg) orally at once, followed by 8.3 mg chloroquine phosphate/kg (5 mg base/kg) orally at 6, 24, and 48 hours; represents a total dose of 41.7 mg chloroquine phosphate/kg (25 mg base/kg) in 3 days

For the treatment of uncomplicated malaria due to chloroquine-sensitive P vivax or P ovale, concomitant treatment with primaquine phosphate is recommended.

Usual Adult Dose for Amebiasis

Extraintestinal Amebiasis: 1 g chloroquine phosphate (600 mg base) orally once a day for 2 days, followed by 500 mg chloroquine phosphate (300 mg base) orally once a day for at least 2 to 3 weeks

Treatment is usually combined with an effective intestinal amebicide.

Usual Adult Dose for Sarcoidosis

Study (n=43)
Intrathoracic and cutaneous: 250 mg twice a day for 4 to 17 months; a treatment course should be limited to 6 months to minimize risk of ocular damage

Study (n=23)
Pulmonary: 750 mg per day for 6 months, then tapered every 2 months to 250 mg per day

Study (n=37)
Nervous system (neurosarcoidosis): 250 mg twice a day for 6 to 18 months

Usual Pediatric Dose for Malaria Prophylaxis

Pediatric dose should not exceed the adult dose regardless of weight.

8.3 mg chloroquine phosphate/kg (5 mg base/kg) orally on the same day each week starting 2 weeks prior to exposure

If unable to start 2 weeks before exposure, an initial loading dose of 16.7 mg chloroquine phosphate/kg (10 mg base/kg) may be taken orally in 2 divided doses, 6 hours apart.

Suppressive therapy should continue for 8 weeks after leaving the endemic area.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Malaria

Chloroquine-sensitive uncomplicated malaria (Plasmodium species or species not identified):
60 kg or more: 1 g chloroquine phosphate (600 mg base) orally at once, followed by 500 mg chloroquine phosphate (300 mg base) orally at 6, 24, and 48 hours; represents a total dose of 2.5 g chloroquine phosphate (1.5 g base) in 3 days

Less than 60 kg: 16.7 mg chloroquine phosphate/kg (10 mg base/kg) orally at once, followed by 8.3 mg chloroquine phosphate/kg (5 mg base/kg) orally at 6, 24, and 48 hours; represents a total dose of 41.7 mg chloroquine phosphate/kg (25 mg base/kg) in 3 days

For the treatment of uncomplicated malaria due to chloroquine-sensitive P vivax or P ovale, concomitant treatment with primaquine phosphate is recommended.

Renal Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Liver Dose Adjustments

The manufacturer recommends caution when administering this drug to patients with hepatic disorders, alcoholism, or with concomitant hepatotoxic agents.

Dose Adjustments

The dosage of chloroquine is often expressed or calculated as the base: each 500 mg tablet of chloroquine phosphate is equivalent to 300 mg base.

The pediatric dose should never exceed the adult dose.

Precautions

Patients should be strongly warned to keep chloroquine out of the reach of children. A number of fatalities have been reported following accidental ingestion, sometimes in relatively small doses (0.75 g or 1 g chloroquine phosphate in one 3-year-old child).

Chloroquine is contraindicated in patients with retinal or visual field changes due to 4-aminoquinoline agents or other causes. If treating acute malaria, risk versus benefit should be considered before using chloroquine.

Chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum is widespread (e.g., sub-Saharan Africa, Southeast Asia, the Indian subcontinent, large portions of South America. including the Amazon basin). Chloroquine should not be used for malaria prophylaxis or treatment in resistant areas. It should also not be used for malaria treatment if chloroquine prophylaxis has failed. Alternate agents should be used to treat malaria and parasitemia due to resistant strains where recommended chloroquine doses have failed.

Irreversible retinal damage related to chloroquine use has occurred in some patients receiving high doses or long-term therapy. Retinopathy has been reported to be dose related. If patients are to receive prolonged therapy, baseline and periodic follow-up ophthalmologic examinations (including visual acuity, expert slitlamp, funduscopic, and visual field tests) are recommended. If signs or symptoms occur that are indicative of abnormality in the visual acuity, visual field, or retinal macular areas, or any visual symptoms occur which cannot be explained by accommodation difficulties or corneal opacities occur which cannot be explained by accommodation difficulties or corneal opacities, chloroquine therapy should be discontinued and the patient should be observed for possible progression. Retinal changes and visual disturbances may progress after therapy is discontinued.

The American Academy of Ophthalmology recommendations on screening for chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine retinopathy advises that all individuals starting these drugs should have a complete baseline ophthalmologic examination within the first year of treatment. This should include examination of the retina through a dilated pupil and testing of central visual field sensitivity by either a self-testing grid chart (Amsler grid) or an automated field tester (Humphrey 10-2 testing). If the patient is in the low-risk category and examination results are normal, screening during the next 5 years can be at the frequency of regular ophthalmic examinations recommended for the age of the patient. For patients in the higher-risk category, which includes anyone using these drugs regularly for greater than 5 years, annual eye examinations are recommended.

Patients on long-term therapy should be periodically monitored for muscle weakness, including knee and ankle reflexes. Chloroquine should be discontinued if weakness occurs.

Complete blood cell counts should be monitored periodically during long-term therapy. Consideration should be given to discontinuing chloroquine if any severe hematologic disorders occur which cannot be attributed to the disease under treatment.

Chloroquine may precipitate severe attacks of psoriasis and may exacerbate porphyria. Its use is not recommended in patients with these conditions unless the potential benefit outweighs the risk.

Caution is recommended in patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

Caution is recommended in patients with preexisting auditory damage. Immediate discontinuation and close observation is recommended if hearing defects occur during treatment.

Careful dose selection and renal monitoring are recommended in patients with decreased renal function and the elderly.

Dialysis

Hemodialysis: Data not available
Peritoneal dialysis: May be somewhat effective in reducing the level of the drug in the blood

Other Comments

Concomitant therapy with an 8-aminoquinoline compound is necessary for radical cure of malaria due to P vivax and P malariae.

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