Join the 'Vincristine' group to help and get support from people like you.

Vincristine Blog

Medicines Are Biggest Culprit in Fatal Allergic Reactions: Study

Posted 10 Oct 2014 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 9, 2014 – Although food allergies have garnered a lot of attention lately, a new study reports that medications are actually the biggest cause of sudden deaths related to allergy. Over a little more than a decade, nearly 60 percent of the allergy-related deaths were caused by medications, while less than 7 percent were caused by food allergies, the study found. "Medications can be dangerous," said study researcher Dr. Elina Jerschow, director of the Drug Allergy Center at Montefiore Medical Center and assistant professor of medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, in New York City. While research from other countries has reported medications as a major culprit in anaphylaxis-related deaths, Jerschow said, the problem has been less defined in the United States. One reason is that there is no national registry for anaphylaxis deaths, she said. The study was ... Read more

Related support groups: Amoxicillin, Provera, Doxycycline, Methotrexate, Depo-Provera, Cephalexin, Penicillin, Bactrim, Clindamycin, Metronidazole, Azithromycin, Lupron, Cipro, Accutane, Ciprofloxacin, Levaquin, Augmentin, Flagyl, Zithromax, Keflex

Cancer Chemotherapy Tied to Slight Rise in Risk for Leukemia

Posted 14 Feb 2013 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 14 – Chemotherapy can be a lifesaver for thousands of cancer patients, but a new study suggests that it might slightly raise the odds for a type of leukemia later in life. Over the past 30 years, the risk for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has increased for patients who underwent chemotherapy for certain forms of cancer, particularly non-Hodgkin lymphoma, the new study found. On the other hand, the researchers from the U.S. National Cancer Institute said other cancer survivors may have a reduced risk for AML due to a change in chemotherapy agents that occurred decades ago. One expert not connected to the study stressed that cancer patients need to put the findings into perspective. "It's important to realize that the risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia related to prior chemotherapy is small and increases with the number of chemotherapy treatments given over time," ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Provera, Methotrexate, Depo-Provera, Lupron, Accutane, Tamoxifen, Medroxyprogesterone, Arimidex, Lupron Depot, Femara, Gleevec, Fluorouracil, Rituxan, Tretinoin, Claravis, Zoladex, Votrient, Tarceva, Avastin

FDA Approves Marqibo for Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

Posted 9 Aug 2012 by Drugs.com

August 9, 2012 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Marqibo (vincristine sulfate liposome injection) to treat adults with a rare type of leukemia called Philadelphia chromosome negative (Ph-) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). ALL is a rapidly progressing form of blood and bone marrow cancer that is more commonly diagnosed in children than adults. According to the National Cancer Institute, an estimated 6,050 men and women will be diagnosed with ALL and 1,440 will die from the disease this year. Marqibo is approved for patients whose leukemia has returned (relapsed) two or more times, or whose leukemia has progressed following two or more regimens of anti-leukemia therapy. Marqibo contains vincristine, a commonly used anti-cancer drug, encased within a liposome, a drug delivery vehicle composed of material similar to that of cell membranes. It is an injection ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Vincristine

Marqibo Approved for Rare Leukemia

Posted 9 Aug 2012 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 9 – Marqibo (vincristine sulfate liposome injection) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat adults with a rare form of blood and bone marrow cancer, Philadelphia chromosome negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia, abbreviated ALL. The drug is sanctioned for people whose disease has progressed, despite use of at least two anti-leukemia regimens. ALL is most-often diagnosed in children. The National Cancer Institute estimates that 6,050 people will be diagnosed this year with the disease, and 1,440 will die from it, the FDA said Thursday in a news release. Marqibo was approved as an orphan drug, designed to treat a rare disease or condition. The drug was evaluated in a clinical trial of adults whose disease had relapsed at least twice, despite standard anti-leukemia treatments. The most common side effects reported were constipation, nausea, low ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Vincristine

More Aggressive Chemo May Help Younger Lymphoma Patients: Study

Posted 27 Nov 2011 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 24 – Higher doses of chemotherapy with less time between treatments may benefit younger people suffering from aggressive lymphomas, such as diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (one of the most common and aggressive forms of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma), according to new research. A study published online Nov. 24 in The Lancet found this intensive form of chemotherapy, when combined with the monoclonal antibody drug rituximab, may reduce recurrence of the disease and increase survival rates among patients under 60 years of age. The researchers said these younger patients are about twice as likely to remain in remission after three years versus those given rituximab plus the standard chemotherapy treatment known as CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone). In conducting the study, researchers led by Dr. Herve Tilly of the University of Rouen in France gave ... Read more

Related support groups: Prednisone, Rituxan, Lymphoma, Rituximab, Cytoxan, Cyclophosphamide, Vincristine, Adriamycin, Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Doxorubicin, Deltasone, Sterapred, Oncovin, Cytoxan Lyophilized, Liquid Pred, Sterapred DS, Bleomycin, Meticorten, Adriamycin PFS, Vincasar PFS

Cancer Patients Should Ask Doctors to Use Simple Terms

Posted 28 Sep 2011 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 – Cancer patients are often faced with many difficult-to-understand treatment choices that can have serious side effects and even mean the difference between life and death. That's why it's crucial that patients insist doctors use plain language in explaining the options, advised Angela Fagerlin, an associate professor of internal medicine at the University of Michigan Medical School and a researcher at the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center. "People are making life and death decisions that may affect their survival and they need to know what they're getting themselves into. Cancer treatments and tests can be serious. Patients need to know what kind of side effects they might experience as a result of the treatment they undergo," Fagerlin said in a university news release. She and her colleagues outlined a number of tips to help patients get the information they need ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Provera, Methotrexate, Depo-Provera, Breast Cancer, Lupron, Accutane, Prostate Cancer, Tamoxifen, Medroxyprogesterone, Arimidex, Lupron Depot, Femara, Gleevec, Fluorouracil, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Lung Cancer, Rituxan, Tretinoin, Claravis

Ask a Question

Further Information

Related Condition Support Groups

Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Cancer, Evan's Syndrome, Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Rhabdomyosarcoma, Wilms' Tumor, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Neuroblastoma, Mantle Cell Lymphoma, Multiple Myeloma, Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma

Related Drug Support Groups

Oncovin, Vincasar PFS

Vincristine Patient Information at Drugs.com