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Health Tip: Coping With Chickenpox

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

-- What can you do if you get chickenpox – besides scratch? The American Academy of Family Physicians suggests: Keep the room cool, as heat can make itchy skin worse. Put a cool, damp compress on the itchiest spots. Keep fingernails trimmed short so you don't break the skin if you do scratch. Soak in a lukewarm oatmeal bath. Apply calamine lotion. Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Loratadine, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Chlorpheniramine, Periactin, Cyproheptadine, Xyzal, Levocetirizine, Benadryl Allergy

Got a Rash? You Might Be Allergic to Nickel, Dermatologist Says

Posted 9 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 20, 2015 – Nickel is one of the most common causes of a skin rash that occurs due to contact with an allergen, a dermatologist says. This type of rash, allergic contact dermatitis, can be caused by nickel in jewelry, a patient's diet, nickel in a medical implant or nickel in a medication that's applied to the skin, said Dr. Jennifer Chen, a clinical assistant professor of dermatology at Stanford Hospital and Clinics, in Stanford, Calif. Typically, an allergic reaction to this metal occurs in an area of skin that comes into contact with an item such as a necklace, belt buckle, zipper, eyeglass frames or cellphone. But nickel in foods can cause an allergic reaction that is more widespread on the body. Foods high in nickel include nuts, seeds, chocolate, wheat and rye, Chen said. "Although allergic reactions to dietary nickel are not as common as nickel allergies overall, ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergies, Allergic Reactions, Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Loratadine, Dermatitis, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Atarax, Clobetasol, Fluocinonide, Fexofenadine, Chlorpheniramine, Kenalog

Add Asthma, Allergy Plans to Your Back-to-School List

Posted 3 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, Aug. 1, 2015 – If your child has asthma or allergies, make sure his or her teacher, principal and school nurse know about it as part of your back-to-school planning, the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) recommends. "More than 10 million kids under age 18 have asthma, and one in four suffer from respiratory allergies," ACAAI President Dr. James Sublett said in a news release from the organization. "Many kids with asthma and food allergies don't have a plan in place at school. An allergy or asthma action plan doesn't do any good if it's not shared with the people who can act on it," he noted. The first step is to have allergy/asthma control measures at home, such as lowering exposure to triggers and taking prescribed medications. At school, it's important for teachers to know your child's asthma and allergy triggers so that they can help the youngster ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Asthma, Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Allegra, Asthma - Maintenance, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Loratadine, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Asthma - Acute, Chlorpheniramine, Periactin, Cyproheptadine

Health Tip: Avoid These Things Before Bedtime

Posted 20 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

-- If you're not getting enough sleep, it could be due to your activities before you hit the hay. The National Sleep Foundation warns against: Taking medications that contain pseudoephedrine, a stimulant. If you need relief from cold or allergy symptoms, opt for an antihistamine designed for night-time use. Don't watch TV, work at a computer or use a tablet or smartphone. Light from these screens can over-stimulate your brain. Opt for a book or music instead. Don't take a hot bath just before bed. Bathe at least an hour before so your body has time to cool off before sleep. Don't go to sleep with a full belly, especially if it's loaded with foods high in fat and salt. Don't drink beverages that contain caffeine after the morning. Caffeine can stay in your system for up to 12 hours. Read more

Related support groups: Sleep Disorders, Insomnia, Benadryl, Promethazine, Sta-D, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Allegra, Phenergan, Diphenhydramine, Loratadine, Pseudoephedrine, Vistaril, Sudafed, Cetirizine, Atarax, NyQuil, Fexofenadine, Chlorpheniramine

Dermatologist Offers Advice on Treating Kids' Hives

Posted 20 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, July 18, 2015 – If your child develops an itchy rash, it could be hives, experts say. Common symptoms of hives – which are usually temporary and harmless – include: slightly raised, pink or red areas on the skin; welts that occur alone, in a group, or that connect over a large area; and skin swelling, according to the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD). Hives can be triggered by a wide variety of things, including allergic reactions to food or medication, infections, exercise, stress, cold temperatures, insect bites and stings, pollen, sun exposure and scratching the skin. "The best remedy for hives is to try to avoid whatever triggers them, although identifying this is often difficult," Dr. Bruce Brod, a clinical professor of dermatology at University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, said in an AAD news release. "One way to help identify your triggers is to keep a log ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Allergies, Allergic Reactions, Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Loratadine, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Chlorpheniramine, Periactin, Cyproheptadine, Xyzal

Under-the-Tongue Hay Fever Pills Offer Little Benefit: Study

Posted 30 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 30, 2015 – Under-the-tongue pills for hay fever sufferers provide little symptom relief and often come with bothersome side effects, new research finds. Under-the-tongue, or sublingual, therapy is widely used in Europe as an alternative to allergy shots. In the United States, two such "immunotherapy" pills have been approved recently by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for grass allergies. For this study, Italian researchers looked at 25 clinical trials that evaluated the treatments' effectiveness in reducing symptoms and the need for other allergy medications. "The major finding here is that the benefit of SLIT [sublingual immunotherapy] tablets is very small, compared to placebo," said Dr. Gabriele Di Lorenzo, of the department of internal medicine at the University of Palermo, who led the study. It was published online June 29 in JAMA Internal Medicine. Di Lorenzo ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergies, Allergic Reactions, Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Allegra, Phenergan, Diphenhydramine, Loratadine, Allergic Rhinitis, Vistaril, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Chlorpheniramine, Periactin, Cyproheptadine

Health Tip: Dealing With a Bee Sting

Posted 26 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Most bee stings involve less-than-severe allergic reactions that don't require emergency medical care. To treat most bee stings, the Mayo Clinic advises: Use tweezers to remove the stinger from the skin as quickly as you can. The faster it's removed, the less venom is likely to enter the body. Use soap and water to gently cleanse the area. Sooth swelling and pain with a cold compress or ice pack. If the area is swollen, itchy or red, apply calamine lotion. Take an antihistamine containing diphenhydramine or chlorpheniramine if the itching or swelling is uncomfortable. Don't scratch the affected area. Doing so can lead to an infection. Read more

Related support groups: Allergies, Allergic Reactions, Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Loratadine, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Atarax, Tylenol PM, Fexofenadine, Chlorpheniramine, Periactin, Cyproheptadine, Xyzal

Health Tip: Treating Poison Ivy

Posted 25 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

-- If you've been exposed to poison ivy, a few suggestions can help ease the itch, prevent the rash's spread and reduce your risk of skin infection. The American Academy of Dermatology suggests: Immediately after possible exposure, use soap and lukewarm water to wash the skin. Avoid scrubbing areas already laden with a poison ivy rash. Remove all clothing that could have touched the plant, and wash immediately. Use lukewarm soapy water to wash anything that may have touched the plant, including gardening tools, golf clubs, pet fur or pet leashes. Don't scratch the area, since doing so could lead to a skin infection. Don't rub or remove peeling skin. Soothe itchy skin with a short, lukewarm bath in colloidal oatmeal or baking soda. Then apply calamine lotion or hydrocortisone to help ease itching. Use a cool compress to soothe itchy skin, or take an oral antihistamine. Read more

Related support groups: Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Loratadine, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Atarax, Clobetasol, Fluocinonide, Fexofenadine, Chlorpheniramine, Kenalog, Periactin, Cyproheptadine, Clobex

Health Tip: Watch Your Alcohol Consumption

Posted 8 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Drinking alcohol may be unsafe for some people, because it can interact with some medications. The Cleveland Clinic mentions these examples: Aspirin and alcohol may increase the risk of stomach bleeding. Antihistamines may make you very drowsy when combined with alcohol. Large amounts of the painkiller acetaminophen can cause liver damage when combined with alcohol. Some laxatives and cough syrups already contain alcohol. Some antidepressants, anti-anxiety medications, painkillers and sleeping pills may cause serious interactions when combined with alcohol. Read more

Related support groups: Percocet, Vicodin, Norco, Tylenol, Aspirin, Lortab, Acetaminophen, Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Fioricet, Allegra, Paracetamol, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Loratadine, Vistaril, Endocet

Poison Ivy's Gonna Get Ya...

Posted 7 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, June 6, 2015 – Poison ivy, oak and sumac are common outdoor hazards, but there are a number of ways to prevent exposure and reduce your suffering if you do come into contact with these plants, an expert says. "Millions of Americans every year develop an allergic rash after being exposed, and these poisonous plants are pretty much everywhere in the United States except Alaska and Hawaii," Renee Miller, from the Tennessee Poison Center at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, said in center news release. Oils in the plants' leaves, roots and vines get into the skin almost immediately after contact and bind with proteins, causing an immune system reaction that leads to extreme itchiness. "If there's a risk for exposure, wear long pants, long sleeves, gloves and boots," Miller said. But she noted that rubber gloves won't protect you because the plant oils are soluble in rubber ... Read more

Related support groups: Skin Rash, Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Loratadine, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Atarax, Clobetasol, Fluocinonide, Fexofenadine, Chlorpheniramine, Kenalog, Periactin, Cyproheptadine

Do You Need a Doctor for Bug Bites and Bee Stings?

Posted 25 May 2015 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, May 24, 2015 – Summer is fast approaching, along with its usual bonanza of bugs. Fortunately, most of those inevitable bites and stings aren't serious. But, experts from the American Academy of Dermatology advise going to the emergency room right away if you notice any of the following symptoms soon after a bug bite or sting: Difficulty breathing, The feeling that your throat is closing, Swelling of lips, tongue or face, Chest pain, A racing heartbeat for more than a few minutes, Dizziness or headache, Vomiting. Also beware of a red rash that looks like a donut or bullseye target after a tick bite, or a fever with a spreading red or black spotty rash. These can be signs of serious tick-related illness. "Although most bug bites and stings do not turn into a severe or even fatal illness like Rocky Mountain spotted fever, it's important to pay attention to your symptoms," Dr. ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergies, Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Allegra, Diphenhydramine, Phenergan, Loratadine, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Atarax, Angioedema, Fexofenadine, Chlorpheniramine, Periactin, Cyproheptadine, Xyzal, Anaphylaxis

Health Tip: Pollen Isn't the Only Allergen

Posted 13 May 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Pollen from weeds, grasses and trees are common culprits for seasonal allergies, but don't forget about other things that can trigger a case of the sneezes. The American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology says other possible allergens could include: Smoke from fires, whether indoor fireplaces during winter or outdoor bonfires during summer. Insect stings and bites. Chlorine used in pools. Ingredients in food and candy. Wreaths and pine trees used as holiday decorations. Read more

Related support groups: Allergies, Allergic Reactions, Smoking, Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Allegra, Phenergan, Diphenhydramine, Loratadine, Allergic Rhinitis, Vistaril, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Atarax, Angioedema, Fexofenadine, Chlorpheniramine

Peanut Allergy Exposure Occurs Most Often at Home, Study Says

Posted 11 May 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 11, 2015 – For children with peanut allergies, home is more dangerous than school, researchers say. The Canadian study also found schools that ban peanut products are not less likely to have an accidental exposure occur than schools that don't have these policies in place. "Our study looked at 1,941 children who had been diagnosed as being allergic to peanuts to determine how exposure occurs, how serious the outcomes of the exposure are, and what treatment is given," said the study's first author, Sabrine Cherkaoui, of the University of Montreal. "We discovered that children are most at risk of exposure in their own homes. Furthermore, when children do have a moderate or severe reaction to an exposure, parents and medical professionals often do not know how to react appropriately," Cherkaoui said in a university news release. The children were nearly 7 years old on average ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergies, Allergic Reactions, Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Allegra, Phenergan, Diphenhydramine, Loratadine, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Chlorpheniramine, Epinephrine, Periactin, Cyproheptadine, Xyzal

Is It a Cold or an Allergy?

Posted 5 May 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 5, 2015 – It can be difficult for parents to tell whether their child has a cold or hay fever, but there are ways to distinguish between the two, experts say. "Runny, stuffy or itchy noses, sneezing, coughing, fatigue, and headaches can all be symptoms of both allergies and colds, but when parents pay close attention to minor details they will be able to tell the difference," Dr. Michelle Lierl, a pediatric allergist at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, said in a hospital news release. "Children who have springtime or fall allergies have much more itching of their noses; they often have fits of sneezing and usually rub their noses in an upward motion," Lierl explained. "They also complain about an itchy, scratchy throat or itchy eyes, whereas with a cold, they don't." Nasal discharge is usually clear if someone has allergies and yellowish if someone has a ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergies, Allergic Reactions, Benadryl, Promethazine, Sta-D, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Allegra, Phenergan, Diphenhydramine, Loratadine, Pseudoephedrine, Allergic Rhinitis, Vistaril, Sudafed, Hay Fever, Cold Symptoms, Cetirizine, Atarax

Surge in Pollen May Spur Many Cases of Dry Eye

Posted 29 Apr 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 29, 2015 – High pollen levels in the spring are linked to dry eye, a new study suggests. "Finding this correlation between dry eye and different seasons is one step toward helping physicians and patients treat the symptoms of dry eye even more effectively based on the time of year," said lead researcher Dr. Anat Galor, an associate professor of clinical ophthalmology at the University of Miami. Dry eye causes burning, irritation and blurred vision. It costs the U.S. health system nearly $4 billion a year, Galor's team said in background information with the study. The researchers analyzed 3.4 million visits to Veterans Affairs eye clinics nationwide between 2006 and 2011. During that time, nearly 607,000 cases of dry eye were diagnosed. April had the highest rate of patients diagnosed with dry eye, nearly 21 percent. April is also when pollen levels usually peak each ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergies, Allergic Reactions, Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Allegra, Phenergan, Diphenhydramine, Loratadine, Allergic Rhinitis, Vistaril, Eye Dryness/Redness, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Chlorpheniramine, Periactin

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