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Medicines Are Biggest Culprit in Fatal Allergic Reactions: Study

Posted 10 Oct 2014 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 9, 2014 – Although food allergies have garnered a lot of attention lately, a new study reports that medications are actually the biggest cause of sudden deaths related to allergy. Over a little more than a decade, nearly 60 percent of the allergy-related deaths were caused by medications, while less than 7 percent were caused by food allergies, the study found. "Medications can be dangerous," said study researcher Dr. Elina Jerschow, director of the Drug Allergy Center at Montefiore Medical Center and assistant professor of medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, in New York City. While research from other countries has reported medications as a major culprit in anaphylaxis-related deaths, Jerschow said, the problem has been less defined in the United States. One reason is that there is no national registry for anaphylaxis deaths, she said. The study was ... Read more

Related support groups: Provera, Amoxicillin, Doxycycline, Depo-Provera, Methotrexate, Penicillin, Cephalexin, Bactrim, Clindamycin, Metronidazole, Azithromycin, Lupron, Cipro, Accutane, Ciprofloxacin, Levaquin, Augmentin, Flagyl, Zithromax, Keflex

New Drug May Slow Advanced Ovarian Cancer

Posted 3 Jun 2013 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, June 1 – Women with advanced ovarian cancer stayed in remission almost six months longer when they were treated with the targeted drug pazopanib (Votrient), new German research says. "Our findings show that we finally have a drug that can maintain control over ovarian cancer growth achieved through initial treatments," study author Dr. Andreas du Bois, a professor of gynecologic oncology at Kliniken Essen-Mitte in Essen, said in a statement. "If pazopanib is approved for ovarian cancer, many patients will experience longer disease-free and chemotherapy-free periods. During this time, the patient keeps control over the disease, instead of the disease having control over patient's life." The results were to be presented Saturday at the American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting, in Chicago. Research presented at medical meetings is considered preliminary until ... Read more

Related support groups: Votrient, Ovarian Cancer, Pazopanib

Cancer Chemotherapy Tied to Slight Rise in Risk for Leukemia

Posted 14 Feb 2013 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 14 – Chemotherapy can be a lifesaver for thousands of cancer patients, but a new study suggests that it might slightly raise the odds for a type of leukemia later in life. Over the past 30 years, the risk for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has increased for patients who underwent chemotherapy for certain forms of cancer, particularly non-Hodgkin lymphoma, the new study found. On the other hand, the researchers from the U.S. National Cancer Institute said other cancer survivors may have a reduced risk for AML due to a change in chemotherapy agents that occurred decades ago. One expert not connected to the study stressed that cancer patients need to put the findings into perspective. "It's important to realize that the risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia related to prior chemotherapy is small and increases with the number of chemotherapy treatments given over time," ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Provera, Depo-Provera, Methotrexate, Lupron, Accutane, Tamoxifen, Medroxyprogesterone, Arimidex, Lupron Depot, Femara, Gleevec, Tretinoin, Fluorouracil, Rituxan, Zoladex, Votrient, Claravis, Tarceva, Avastin

Long-Term Side Effects Key When Cancer Patients Choose Drugs

Posted 4 Jun 2012 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, June 2 – Long-term medication side effects such as fatigue can be key for patients deciding which cancer drug to take, new research suggests. In the study, people with advanced kidney cancer preferred pazopanib (Votrient) over sunitinib (Sutent), according to a randomized controlled trial funded by the makers of pazopanib. Although doctors may not see a big difference between the two U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs for the long-term treatment of kidney cancer that has metastasized (spread to other organs), researchers from France found that patients felt Votrient left them less fatigued and with a better quality of life, according to the study. "While we expected patients would prefer one drug over the other, due to the known toxicity profiles, we didn't expect this great a preference," lead study author Dr. Bernard Escudier, a physician at the Institut ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Votrient, Sutent, Sunitinib, Pazopanib

Votrient Approved to Treat Cancer That Begins in Soft Tissue

Posted 27 Apr 2012 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, April 27 – Votrient (pazopanib) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat people with soft tissue sarcoma that have received previous chemotherapy. This type of tumor originates in soft tissue such as a muscle, fat, or fibrous tissue, the agency said in a news release. About 10,000 cases of soft tissue sarcoma are reported each year in the United States. Votrient works by inhibiting angiogenisis, the production of new blood vessels that fuel tumor growth. The drug's safety and effectiveness were evaluated in clinical studies involving 369 people with soft tissue sarcoma who had undergone chemotherapy. Among people who took Votrient, the disease didn't progress for an average of 4.6 months, compared to 1.6 months among people who took an inactive placebo. The most common side effects of Votrient included fatigue, diarrhea, nausea, weight loss, high ... Read more

Related support groups: Votrient, Pazopanib, Soft Tissue Sarcoma

FDA Approves Votrient for Advanced Soft Tissue Sarcoma

Posted 26 Apr 2012 by Drugs.com

April 26, 2012 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Votrient (pazopanib) to treat patients with advanced soft tissue sarcoma who have previously received chemotherapy. Soft tissue sarcoma is a cancer that begins in the muscle, fat, fibrous tissue, and other tissues. Votrient is a pill that works by interfering with angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels needed for solid tumors to grow and survive. A rare cancer with many subtypes, soft tissue sarcoma occurs in about 10,000 cases annually in the United States. More than 20 subtypes of sarcoma were included in the clinical trial leading to approval of Votrient. The drug is not approved for patients with adipocytic soft tissue sarcoma and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. "Soft tissue sarcomas are a diverse group of tumors and the approval of Votrient for this general class of tumors is the first in decades," ... Read more

Related support groups: Votrient, Pazopanib, Soft Tissue Sarcoma

Certain Cancer Drugs May Have Fatal Side Effects: Analysis

Posted 6 Feb 2012 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 6 – Treatment with three relatively new cancer drugs may be linked to a slightly increased risk of death, a new analysis suggests. While the risk is low, it should be taken into account by doctors and patients, according to Dana-Farber Cancer Institute scientists and colleagues. The investigators analyzed the findings of 10 clinical trials that included nearly 4,700 patients treated with sorafenib (Nexavar) for kidney and liver cancer; sunitinib (Sutent) for kidney cancer and gastrointestinal stromal tumor; or pazopanib (Votrient) for kidney cancer. These so-called "targeted" drugs are used to stop the growth or spread of cancer by blocking the vascular endothelial growth factor tyrosine kinase receptors in cancer cells, the researchers explained in a Dana-Farber news release. The analysis of the clinical trials revealed that the incidence of fatal complications was 1.5 ... Read more

Related support groups: Votrient, Sutent, Nexavar, Pazopanib, Sunitinib, Sorafenib

Cancer Patients Should Ask Doctors to Use Simple Terms

Posted 28 Sep 2011 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 28 – Cancer patients are often faced with many difficult-to-understand treatment choices that can have serious side effects and even mean the difference between life and death. That's why it's crucial that patients insist doctors use plain language in explaining the options, advised Angela Fagerlin, an associate professor of internal medicine at the University of Michigan Medical School and a researcher at the U-M Comprehensive Cancer Center. "People are making life and death decisions that may affect their survival and they need to know what they're getting themselves into. Cancer treatments and tests can be serious. Patients need to know what kind of side effects they might experience as a result of the treatment they undergo," Fagerlin said in a university news release. She and her colleagues outlined a number of tips to help patients get the information they need ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Provera, Depo-Provera, Methotrexate, Breast Cancer, Lupron, Accutane, Prostate Cancer, Tamoxifen, Medroxyprogesterone, Arimidex, Lupron Depot, Femara, Gleevec, Fluorouracil, Tretinoin, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Lung Cancer, Rituxan, Colorectal Cancer

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