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Myelodysplastic Syndrome Linked to Abnormal Stem Cells

Posted 5 Jul 2012 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 5 – As researchers suspected, abnormal bone marrow stem cells trigger the development of myelodysplastic syndromes, serious blood diseases that affect the bone marrow and can progress to leukemia, according to a new study. "Good Morning America" host Robin Roberts recently disclosed that she had developed myelodysplastic syndrome, or MDS, as a rare complication of her breast cancer treatment. The syndrome is diagnosed in about 10,000 to 15,000 people in the United States each year, mostly in men and in those over age 60. The new findings, published in the July 2 online edition of Blood, could lead to improved treatments for myelodysplastic syndrome and cancers related to the syndrome, researchers from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, in New York City, suggested in an Einstein news release. "Researchers have suspected that [myelodysplastic ... Read more

Related support groups: Myelodysplastic Syndrome

Drugs Previously Thought to Be Toxic May Stop Spread of Cancer

Posted 30 Mar 2012 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 30 – Two drugs previously thought to be too toxic for human cancer treatment may stop the growth of cancer cells without killing healthy cells and damaging DNA when used in small doses, researchers have found. Unlike conventional chemotherapy drugs, which poison and kill any rapidly dividing cells by damaging cellular machinery and DNA, these drugs – azacitidine (AZA) and decitabine (DAC) – specifically target cancer stem cells, which cause cancer to spread and are resistant to most drugs. "Low doses of AZA and DAC may reactivate genes that stop cancer growth without causing immediate cell killing or DNA damage," Dr. Stephen Baylin, a professor of oncology and deputy director of the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center in Baltimore, said in a news release from Hopkins. Although AZA and DAC were dismissed as too toxic for the treatment of common cancers, the drugs have ... Read more

Related support groups: Lung Cancer, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Dacogen, Vidaza, Decitabine, Azacitidine

Bone Marrow Cancer Patients May Benefit From Drug Combo

Posted 29 Mar 2010 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, March 29 – The drugs azacitidine and lenalidomide provide a highly effective combination treatment for bone marrow cancer, according to the results of a new study. The phase 1 study, which was funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health, included 18 higher-risk patients, median age 68, with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). In people with this cancer (which is similar to leukemia), stem cells fail to mature into healthy red blood cells, white blood cells or platelets. This leads to infection, anemia and bleeding complications. The patient response rate to the combined drug treatment was 67 percent, and the treatment was well-tolerated. The combined treatment had a better response rate and remission rate than either drug used alone. This is the first time that two U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs have been combined for the treatment of MDS. The findings were ... Read more

Related support groups: Revlimid, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Vidaza, Azacitidine, Lenalidomide

FDA Approves Five-Day Dosing Regimen for Dacogen (decitabine) for Injection, Offering a New Outpatient Dosing Option for Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS)

Posted 15 Mar 2010 by Drugs.com

WOODCLIFF LAKE, N.J., March 11 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ – Eisai Inc. today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a five-day dosing regimen for Dacogen (decitabine) for Injection to treat patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), a group of bone marrow diseases that alter the production of functional blood cells. The new outpatient dosing option provides physicians and patients with the flexibility of a dosing regimen with a reduced infusion time. Dacogen is the only hypomethylating agent approved for a five-day dosing regimen. The new regimen will be administered at a dose of 20 mg/m2 continuous intravenous (IV) infusion over one hour repeated daily for five days per cycle. The cycle is repeated every four weeks. The previously approved Dacogen three-day regimen is administered in an in-patient setting at a dose of 15 mg/m2 continuous IV ... Read more

Related support groups: Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Dacogen, Myelodysplastic Diseases

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Vidaza, Dacogen, decitabine, filgrastim, azacitidine