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Related terms: Cancer, Lymphoma

FDA Approves Beleodaq (belinostat) for Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

Posted 20 days ago by Drugs.com

July 3, 2014 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Beleodaq (belinostat) for the treatment of patients with peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL), a rare and fast-growing type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The action was taken under the agency’s accelerated approval program. PTCL comprises a diverse group of rare diseases in which lymph nodes become cancerous. In 2014, the National Cancer Institute estimates that 70,800 Americans will be diagnosed with NHL and 18,990 will die. PTCL represents about 10 to 15 percent of NHLs in North America. Beleodaq works by stopping enzymes that contribute to T-cells, a type of immune cell, becoming cancerous. It is intended for patients whose disease returned after treatment (relapsed) or did not respond to previous treatment (refractory). “This is the third drug that has been approved since 2009 for the treatment of peripheral T-c ... Read more

Related support groups: Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma

Beleodaq Approved for Aggressive non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Posted 20 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 3, 2014 – Beleodaq (belinostat) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat peripheral T-Cell lymphoma (PTCL), a rare and aggressive form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (cancer of the lymph nodes). Some 70,800 Americans will be diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma this year, of which up to 15 percent will be PTCL, according to U.S. National Cancer Institute estimates. Beleodaq is designed to inhibit immune cells called T-cells from becoming cancerous, the FDA explained Thursday in a news release. The drug is intended for people whose cancer has returned or who didn't respond to a prior therapy, the agency said. Beleodaq's safety and effectiveness were evaluated in clinical studies involving 129 people with PTCL. All were treated with the newly approved drug, and about 26 percent had their cancer disappear or shrink, the FDA said. The most common side ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma

Experimental Drug May Boost Leukemia Survival, Without Chemo

Posted 12 Mar 2014 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 12, 2014 – An experimental drug may extend the lives of people with certain hard-to-treat forms of leukemia and lymphoma – without the need for traditional chemotherapy, according to two studies released Wednesday. The drug, called idelalisib, targets a specific enzyme on white blood cells known as B cells. Researchers found that for people with certain forms of recurrent blood cancers, the drug substantially extended the time that patients lived with no tumor progression. One of the trials, of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), was stopped early because the benefits of idelalisib over standard treatment became so clear. The drug is now up for expedited review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), for possible approval. A cancer researcher not involved in either trial called the CLL results "fantastic." If idelalisib is approved, "I think ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia, Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL)

Study: Pollen Allergies May Raise Risk for Blood Cancers in Women

Posted 4 Dec 2013 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 4, 2013 – Women with pollen allergies may be at increased risk for blood cancers such as leukemia and lymphoma, a new study suggests. Researchers did not uncover the same link in men. This suggests there is something unique in women that causes chronic allergy-related stimulation of the immune system to increase vulnerability to the development of blood cancers, the study authors said. The study included 66,000 people, aged 50 to 76, who were followed for an average of eight years. During the follow-up period, 681 people developed a blood cancer. These people were more likely to be male, to have two or more first-degree relatives with a history of leukemia or lymphoma, to be less active and to rate their health status as poor. Among women, however, a history of allergies to plants, grass and trees was significantly associated with a higher risk of blood cancers. The ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergies, Leukemia, Lymphoma

Lymphoma Risk Varies for Celiac Disease Patients

Posted 5 Aug 2013 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 5 – Celiac disease patients with ongoing intestinal damage have a higher risk for lymphoma than those with healed intestines, a new study finds. The intestinal damage in people with celiac disease is caused by a reaction to eating gluten, which is found in wheat, barley and rye. After diagnosis, many patients switch to a gluten-free diet. Patients often are followed up on to assess the effects that dietary changes and treatment have on intestinal healing. Lymphoma is a type of blood cancer that begins in the lymph system, and can eventually spread to other parts of the body. This study included more than 7,600 people with celiac disease who had follow-up intestinal biopsies six months to five years after their diagnosis, and were then followed for roughly nine years. At the time of their follow-up biopsy, 57 percent of the patients had healed intestines while 43 percent ... Read more

Related support groups: Celiac Disease, Lymphoma

Survival Picture No Better for Patients With HIV-Related Lymphoma: Study

Posted 26 Jul 2013 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 26 – Survival rates for patients with HIV-associated lymphoma have not improved since antiretroviral therapy (ART) became available, according to a new study. HIV, the AIDS-causing virus, raises the risk of lymphoma, a blood cancer, which is the most common cancer-related cause of death among people with HIV. "These results highlight an ongoing need to ... optimize treatments for this challenging population to reduce deaths from one of the leading causes of mortality in the [antiretroviral therapy] era," said Dr. Satish Gopal, of the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of North Carolina. For the study, published July 26 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, researchers examined data from nearly 500 patients diagnosed with HIV-associated lymphoma between 1996 and 2010. Patients diagnosed more recently were older and more likely to be male, ... Read more

Related support groups: HIV Infection, Lymphoma

FDA Approves Revlimid (lenalidomide) for the Treatment of Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Posted 5 Jun 2013 by Drugs.com

SUMMIT, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Jun. 5, 2013-- Celgene Corporation today announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the company’s supplemental new drug application (sNDA) for Revlimid (lenalidomide) for the treatment of patients with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) whose disease has relapsed or progressed after two prior therapies, one of which included bortezomib. “There remains a tremendous unmet need for patients with previously-treated mantle cell lymphoma,” said Andre Goy, M.D., M.S., Chairman and Director and Chief of Lymphoma, John Theurer Cancer Center at Hackensack UMC and Chief Science Officer and Director of Research and Innovation at Regional Cancer Care Associates, LLC. “The approval of lenalidomide delivers a new option, and the first oral therapy in this area of lymphoma.” The approval was based on the results of MCL-001, a phase II, multi-center, singl ... Read more

Related support groups: Lymphoma, Revlimid, Lenalidomide, Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin's

New Strategy Helps Young Lymphoma Patients Avoid Radiation Treatment

Posted 10 Apr 2013 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 10 – A new treatment approach may mean that young people with a form of lymphoma can go without radiation therapy, sparing them side effects or raised cancer risks down the road. In a trial conducted by the U.S. National Cancer Institute, nearly all patients with a form of cancer known as primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma who received chemotherapy, but did not undergo chest radiation, achieved a full remission. Standard treatment for this cancer typically includes radiation to the chest, the study authors pointed out, but this has been linked to significant harmful effects in the future, particularly for women. "These results are exciting and demonstrate that, using this approach, almost all patients appear to be cured and very few patients require radiation," study co-author Dr. Kieron Dunleavy, of the U.S. National Cancer Institute, said in an agency news release. ... Read more

Related support groups: Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Hodgkin's Lymphoma

Blood Cancer Patients May Benefit From New Transplant Technique

Posted 12 Dec 2012 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 12 – Researchers who have multiplied umbilical cord-blood cells in the laboratory say their technique might improve recovery for patients needing blood stem cell transplants to treat a blood cancer. Their approach, still in the experimental stage, involves expanding normal blood cells from donated cord blood in conditions similar to those in bone marrow. This greatly enlarges the supply needed for transplant. And because umbilical cord blood is more easily matched in patients than donor bone marrow, the recovery period is safer and shorter, the researchers said. "Since our very first patients, we had a very strong signal [of success]," said Dr. Marcos de Lima, who led the study while at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. "Recipients of cord-blood transplants are less likely to have some of the complications with the same degree of matching ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia, Lymphoma, Multiple Myeloma

Melanoma Odds Doubled for Transplant, Lymphoma Patients: Study

Posted 10 Oct 2012 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 10 – Transplant recipients and patients with lymphoma have a significantly increased risk of developing and dying from melanoma, the most dangerous type of skin cancer, a new study indicates. Researchers from the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota found that melanoma is 2.5 times more likely to strike these patients than people in the general population. Melanoma is also more likely to be fatal in these patients, according to the study, published in the October issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Patients with a form of lymphoma called chronic lymphocytic leukemia who develop melanoma are 2.8 times more likely to die from metastatic melanoma, in which the cancer spreads from the skin to other parts of the body. Transplant recipients and lymphoma patients have weakened immune systems, which makes early detection of melanoma especially important, the researchers said. Early detection ... Read more

Related support groups: Lymphoma, Melanoma

'Uncertainty' Remains Over Supply of Key Cancer Drugs

Posted 4 Jun 2012 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, June 4 – John Mahan, a 58-year-old Nashville firefighter battling a gastrointestinal cancer, couldn't believe what he was hearing last July. His doctor had just told him that his clinic had run out of injectable fluorouracil (5-FU), the generic chemotherapy Mahan needed to keep his tumor at bay. "My initial reaction was, 'you've got to be kidding, right?'" he said. Unfortunately, the news was all too real. Mahan was switched to another drug, capecitabine. Taken in pill form, it had the same anti-cancer effectiveness as 5-FU but with more onerous side effects. "It made me feel bad, weak," Mahan said, "just run down, feeling tired all of the time, loss of appetite." At a Monday news briefing at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) in Chicago, Mahan spoke on behalf of the thousands of cancer patients who have been hit hard by the recent nationwide ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Methotrexate, Fluorouracil, Colorectal Cancer, Lymphoma, Xeloda, Taxol, Head and Neck Cancer, Paclitaxel, Capecitabine, Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Adrucil, Methotrexate LPF Sodium, Trexall, Folex PFS, Onxol, Rheumatrex Dose Pack

Experimental Drug Helps Fight Some Childhood Cancers, Study Finds

Posted 16 May 2012 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 16 – A new targeted drug therapy may help treat certain advanced cancers in children, a new preliminary study indicates. In some cases, the oral medication even made tumors disappear after regular cancer treatments had failed, the researchers reported. "This is an exciting first step, and it looks very promising for kids who have had very few options," said study author Dr. Yael Mosse, an assistant professor of pediatrics in the division of oncology at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Mosse is scheduled to present the findings on June 2 at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting in Chicago. However, ASCO released the results during a news conference Wednesday. Funding for the study was provided by the drug's manufacturer, Pfizer Inc. The new drug is called crizotinib (Xalkori), and it targets abnormalities in a gene called ALK that's present in ... Read more

Related support groups: Lymphoma, Xalkori, Crizotinib

More Aggressive Chemo May Help Younger Lymphoma Patients: Study

Posted 27 Nov 2011 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 24 – Higher doses of chemotherapy with less time between treatments may benefit younger people suffering from aggressive lymphomas, such as diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (one of the most common and aggressive forms of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma), according to new research. A study published online Nov. 24 in The Lancet found this intensive form of chemotherapy, when combined with the monoclonal antibody drug rituximab, may reduce recurrence of the disease and increase survival rates among patients under 60 years of age. The researchers said these younger patients are about twice as likely to remain in remission after three years versus those given rituximab plus the standard chemotherapy treatment known as CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone). In conducting the study, researchers led by Dr. Herve Tilly of the University of Rouen in France gave ... Read more

Related support groups: Prednisone, Rituxan, Lymphoma, Rituximab, Cytoxan, Cyclophosphamide, Vincristine, Adriamycin, Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Doxorubicin, Deltasone, Sterapred, Oncovin, Cytoxan Lyophilized, Liquid Pred, Sterapred DS, Bleomycin, Meticorten, Adriamycin PFS, Vincasar PFS

'Mini' Stem Cell Transplant May Help Seniors With Blood Cancer

Posted 1 Nov 2011 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 1 – Age in itself should not be a factor in deciding whether blood cancer patients are candidates for stem cell transplantation, according to a new study. Blood cancers include leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma. For the study, researchers analyzed long-term outcomes among 372 blood cancer patients aged 60 to 75 who underwent a "mini-transplant," which is a "kinder, gentler" form of allogeneic (cells from another person) stem cell transplantation developed at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. The five-year rates of overall survival and disease progression-free survival among the patients were 35 percent and 32 percent, respectively. Comparable survival rates were seen when the patients were divided into three age groups – 60 to 64, 65 to 69, and 70 to 75 – suggesting that age plays a limited role in the success of the mini-transplant. While a survival ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia, Lymphoma, Multiple Myeloma

As One Life Starts, Another May Be Saved

Posted 7 Oct 2011 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 7 – A mother cuddling her newborn baby may not know it, but the process that created a new life also has given her the chance to save another. Blood contained in the umbilical cord and placenta is a rich source of stem cells that can be used to treat leukemia, lymphoma and many other life-threatening diseases, according to the National Marrow Donor Program. However, many expectant mothers don't know that they can donate cord blood after childbirth. Others don't donate because they are concerned the process might be expensive or risk the health of their newborn. "Less than 5 percent of parents are storing their children's cord blood," said Frances Verter, founder and director of the Parent's Guide to Cord Blood Foundation. "That's just a tragedy because it's medically important and there is no danger to mother or child from donation." Cord blood is considered valuable ... Read more

Related support groups: Leukemia, Lymphoma

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