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Related terms: Congenital Heart Disease

FDA Ban on Harmful Trans Fats Expected Soon

Posted 15 Jun 2015 by

SUNDAY, June 14, 2015 – Harmful trans fats may soon be banished from America's food supply, following a U.S. Food and Drug Administration announcement expected any day now. The move could prevent as many as 20,000 heart attacks and 7,000 deaths from heart disease a year, the FDA says. Most trans fats in food come from partially hydrogenated oils. Up to now, the FDA has designated these oils with "generally recognized as safe" status. That allows manufacturers to use the oils in food without prior FDA approval. But under the proposed rule on the verge of finalization, the FDA would reclassify partially hydrogenated oils as food additives. This means companies would need federal approval before including them in food products. "This is going to be a huge public health victory," said Jim O'Hara, director of health promotion for the Center for Science in the Public Interest, which ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, High Cholesterol, Heart Attack, Angina, Myocardial Infarction, Hypertriglyceridemia, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

Early CPR Spurred by Smartphone Alerts Saves Lives

Posted 10 Jun 2015 by

WEDNESDAY, June 10, 2015 – Starting cardiopulmonary resuscitation early and using smartphone alerts to increase rates of bystander CPR can save people with cardiac arrest, two new studies find. When CPR was started before an ambulance arrived, twice as many cardiac-arrest patients lived to leave the hospital than when CPR was delayed, researchers said. And alerting people trained in CPR that their help was needed nearby greatly increased the rate of early CPR. "We have proved what has been thought before – that early CPR is associated with improved survival," said lead researcher Dr. Jacob Hollenberg, from the department of cardiology at South Hospital at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. He said a mobile phone app that alerted laypeople trained in CPR that their help was needed nearby increased the rate of early CPR by 30 percent. Both studies were published June 11 in the New ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Angina, Myocardial Infarction, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders, Ischemic Heart Disease, AV Heart Block, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

Resuming Blood Pressure Meds After Surgery Linked to Better Outcomes

Posted 4 Jun 2015 by

THURSDAY, June 4, 2015 – People with high blood pressure who resume taking their medication soon after surgery may have a lower risk of complications and death, a new study suggests. Researchers reviewed information from more than 30,000 patients taking a particular type of high blood pressure medication before surgery. All were taking drugs from a class of medications known as angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs). These drugs are widely used to treat high blood pressure. None of the surgeries was for heart-related problems, according to the researchers. About one-third of those people didn't restart taking their high blood pressure medication within two days of surgery. The study found this group was linked to a higher risk of death within 30 days compared to people who immediately resumed their medication. The increased risk of death in people who didn't start taking their blood ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Heart Disease, Losartan, Benicar, Diovan, Cozaar, Micardis, Valsartan, Avapro, Atacand, Irbesartan, Telmisartan, Candesartan, Olmesartan, Edarbi, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Teveten, Azilsartan medoxomil, Eprosartan

Rise in Deaths Even When Smog Is Below EPA Standard: Study

Posted 3 Jun 2015 by

WEDNESDAY, June 3, 2015 – Death rates among people older than 65 appear to be affected by air pollution, even when the air they breathe meets current standards, researchers say. In the study, Harvard researchers looked at Medicare recipients in the New England region. The investigators found that death rates among seniors were linked to levels of a type of air pollution called "fine-particulate matter" – even in places where air pollution levels were below those recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). No evidence exists for a "safe" level of pollution, said senior report author Joel Schwartz, a professor of environmental epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston. Instead, "we need to focus on ways that lower exposure everywhere all the time," he cautioned. The report was published online June 3 in the journal Environmental Health ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Test Endurance Athletes for Heart Woes While They Exercise: Study

Posted 3 Jun 2015 by

WEDNESDAY, June 3, 2015 – Endurance athletes should be tested for potentially deadly heart rhythm problems when they are exercising rather than resting, and the tests should include the right ventricle as well as the left ventricle, a new study says. Some athletes who participate in endurance events such as marathons and triathlons may have heart rhythm disorders (arrhythmias) that can cause sudden death. A team of researchers from Australia and Belgium found that important signs of rhythm problems in the heart's right ventricle can only be detected during exercise, according to the study published June 3 in the European Heart Journal. Currently, most routine assessments of athletes with suspected heart rhythm problems are done when the patients are resting, and the focus is on the left ventricle, the investigators said. "You do not test a racing car while it is sitting in the garage. ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Atrial Fibrillation, Arrhythmia, Tachyarrhythmia, Supraventricular Tachycardia, Ventricular Tachycardia, Bradyarrhythmia, Ventricular Arrhythmia, Heart Block, Cardiac Arrhythmia, Paroxysmal Supraventricular Tachycardia, Ischemic Heart Disease, Atrial Tachycardia, AV Heart Block, Abnormal Electrocardiogram

Poorer Blacks May Face Higher Odds of Heart Disease

Posted 27 May 2015 by

WEDNESDAY, May 27, 2015 – Poorer black people under age 50 are more than three times as likely to have a heart attack, stroke or other cardiovascular ailment as black people with the highest wealth, a new study suggests. Analyzing data from more than 5,300 black Americans, researchers also found that black women in the lowest income group had more than twice the risk of experiencing a cardiovascular "event" – including death – than those in the highest income group. Study author Samson Gebreab, a staff scientist at the U.S. National Human Genome Research Institute, said the findings – which could be fueled by a combination of physical and social factors – emphasize the need for greater awareness of cardiovascular disease among blacks. "We [also] think resources should be put into early detection and screening of cardiovascular disease, especially in African-American women and ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Attack, Transient Ischemic Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

Don't Give Heart-Healthy Patients Blood Pressure Drugs Before Surgery: Study

Posted 27 May 2015 by

WEDNESDAY, May 27, 2015 – A new study questions the practice of giving heart-healthy patients blood pressure drugs before surgeries that do not involve the heart. While patients with three or four heart risk factors should still be given beta-blockers before an operation, people with no risk for heart disease shouldn't get the medications because it might lower the odds of a good outcome, the researchers reported. Previously these drugs were thought to protect the heart during an operation, but their ability to lower blood pressure caused some patients without heart risk factors to develop dangerously low blood pressure and die from strokes, said lead researcher Dr. Mark Friedell, chairman of the department of surgery at the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine. "Patients who have significant cardiac risk factors benefit from beta-blockers started before surgery, but ... Read more

Related support groups: Metoprolol, Heart Disease, Atenolol, Bystolic, Bisoprolol, Toprol-XL, Lopressor, Tenormin, Metoprolol Succinate ER, Nebivolol, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Sectral, Zebeta, Acebutolol, Esmolol, Betaxolol, Brevibloc, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Kerlone

'Moderate'Drinking Might Harm Older People's Hearts: Study

Posted 26 May 2015 by

TUESDAY, May 26, 2015 – "Moderate" drinking might harm your heart if you're a senior citizen, a new study suggests. And women appear to be at greater risk for alcohol-related heart damage than men, the researchers found. "In an elderly population, increasing alcohol intake is associated with subtle alterations in heart structure and function, with women appearing more susceptible than men to the toxic effects of alcohol," said lead researcher Dr. Alexandra Goncalves. She is a postdoctoral research fellow at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston. The study involved more than 4,400 adults, average age 76. The investigators found that women who drank even moderately – one drink daily – experienced a small reduction in heart function. Among men, consuming more than 14 drinks a week – considered heavy drinking – was linked to enlargement of the heart's left ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Failure, Congestive Heart Failure, Alcohol Dependence, Alcohol Withdrawal, Alcoholism, Left Ventricular Dysfunction, Hangover, Acute Alcohol Intoxication

Coffee May Help Men Keep Impotence at Bay

Posted 21 May 2015 by

THURSDAY, May 21, 2015 – Coffee perks millions of Americans up each morning, and a new study finds it might help keep men's sex lives percolating, too. The study, from the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, found that men who consume more caffeine each day had a lower risk of erectile dysfunction. The exception? Men with diabetes – for them, extra caffeine didn't lower their odds for impotence, the researchers said. "Even though we saw a reduction in the prevalence of erectile dysfunction with men who were obese, overweight and hypertensive, that was not true of men with diabetes. Diabetes is one of the strongest risk factors for erectile dysfunction, so this was not surprising," lead author Dr. David Lopez, assistant professor at UTHealth School of Public Health, said in a university news release. The study couldn't prove cause-and-effect, but one expert said the ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Erectile Dysfunction, Heart Disease, Caffeine, Fioricet, Excedrin, Insulin Resistance, Pre-Diabetes, Alert, Fiorinal, Excedrin Migraine, Cafergot, Diabetes Mellitus, Esgic, Fiorinal with Codeine, Fioricet with Codeine, Norgesic, Esgic-Plus, Excedrin Extra Strength, Headache Relief

Heart Risk Factors May Harm Black Women More Than Whites

Posted 20 May 2015 by

WEDNESDAY, May 20, 2015 – The cluster of heart risk factors known as the "metabolic syndrome" might raise the risk of heart disease more for black women than it does for white women, a new study suggests. Metabolic syndrome refers to having at least three health conditions – including a large waist size, high blood pressure, low levels of "good" HDL cholesterol, high levels of blood fats called triglycerides, and impaired sugar metabolism – that can all work together to boost the odds of diabetes, heart disease and stroke. In the new study, a team led by Dr. Michelle Schmiegelow at University Hospital Gentofte in Denmark looked at data from more than 14,000 American women, aged 50 to 79. All were taking part in a long-term national study. About 47 percent were white, 36 percent were black and 18 percent were Hispanic. Over 13 years of follow-up, about 1,100 of the women were ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, High Cholesterol, Angina, Diabetes Mellitus, Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Ischemic Heart Disease, Metabolic Disorder Including Congenital

Bullied as a Kid, Obese as a Grown-up?

Posted 20 May 2015 by

WEDNESDAY, May 20, 2015 – Adults who were bullied in childhood may be at an increased risk for obesity, heart disease and diabetes, a new British study suggests. "Our research has already shown a link between childhood bullying and risk of mental health disorders in children, adolescents and adults, but this study is the first to widen the spectrum of adverse outcomes to include risks for cardiovascular disease at mid-life," said senior study author Louise Arseneault. She is a professor from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience at King's College London. "Evidently, being bullied in childhood does get under your skin," she said in a college news release. Arseneault and her colleagues analyzed data from more than 7,100 people in a long-term study of all children born in England, Scotland and Wales during one week in 1958. Their parents provided information on whether ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Heart Disease, Diabetes Mellitus

One-Third of Americans Have Dangerous Mix of Heart Risk Factors

Posted 19 May 2015 by

TUESDAY, May 19, 2015 – More than one-third of U.S. adults have a combination of health problems collectively known as metabolic syndrome that increase the risk of heart disease and diabetes, according to new research. What's worse, the researchers found the rate of metabolic syndrome increases dramatically with age. Almost half of people 60 or older in the United States have metabolic syndrome, the study found. "That's concerning, because we know the population of the U.S. is aging," said senior author Dr. Robert Wong, an assistant clinical professor at University of California, San Francisco. "I think it will potentially place a huge burden on our health care system." Metabolic syndrome is a "perfect storm" of conditions that include high blood pressure, abnormal cholesterol levels, increased levels of blood sugar, and a wider waist circumference, Wong said. Medical experts are ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Hypertension, Heart Disease, High Cholesterol, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Crestor, Atorvastatin, Pravastatin, Niacin, Angina, Niaspan, Zocor, Insulin Resistance, Lovastatin, Pre-Diabetes, Vytorin, Rosuvastatin, Hypertriglyceridemia

Many ER Patients With Chest Pain Can Be Sent Home, Study Finds

Posted 18 May 2015 by

MONDAY, May 18, 2015 – While chest pain sends many people to the nearest hospital emergency department, most patients may not need a costly hospital stay as a result, a new study suggests. According to a news release from Ohio State University, chest pain sends more than 7 million Americans to the ER every year and about half of them are then admitted for further observation, testing or treatment. But is the cost and inconvenience of a hospital stay always warranted? The study aimed to "assess whether this population of patients could safely go home and do further outpatient testing within a day or two," lead researcher Dr. Michael Weinstock, a professor of emergency medicine at the university's College of Medicine, said in the news release. His team looked at data from more than 11,000 visits by patients experiencing chest pain to three hospitals in Columbus, Ohio between 2008 and ... Read more

Related support groups: Pain, Heart Disease, Atrial Fibrillation, Heart Attack, Tachyarrhythmia, Angina, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Angina Pectoris Prophylaxis, Bradyarrhythmia, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Diagnosis and Investigation, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Acute Coronary Syndrome - Prophylaxis, Abnormal Electrocardiogram

Hand-Grip Strength May Provide Clues to Heart Health

Posted 13 May 2015 by

WEDNESDAY, May 13, 2015 – Testing hand-grip strength could be a cheap and simple way of identifying people at increased risk for heart attack, stroke and premature death, according to a new study. Researchers looked at nearly 140,000 adults who underwent grip-strength tests. The participants were aged 35 to 70, and they were from 17 countries. Their health was followed for an average of four years. Every 11-pound decrease in grip strength was associated with a 16 percent increased risk of death from any cause, the investigators found. Each decrease was also tied to a 17 percent raised risk of heart-related death or death from non-heart causes. And, every 11-pound drop in grip strength was also associated with a 9 percent increased risk of stroke and a 7 percent higher risk of heart attack, the findings showed. Although this study found an association between grip strength and the risk ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Ischemic Stroke, Heart Attack, Transient Ischemic Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Ischemic Stroke - Prophylaxis, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

Immune System Genes May Change With the Seasons: Study

Posted 12 May 2015 by

TUESDAY, May 12, 2015 – When the seasons change, your immune system response may also change, British researchers report. These findings might explain why conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and heart disease are worse in the winter than in the summer, the new study finds. The researchers from the University of Cambridge analyzed genes from more than 16,000 people worldwide, including those from both the Northern and Southern hemispheres. They found that the activity of nearly one-quarter of the genes differed according to the time of the year. Some are more active in winter and some are more active in summer, the research revealed. Seasons also affect our immune cells, and the composition of our blood and fat, according to the study. Findings were published May 12 in the journal Nature Communications. It's been known that there are seasonal variations in a number of conditions, ... Read more

Related support groups: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Heart Disease, Psychiatric Disorders, Immunosuppression

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Related Condition Support Groups

Arrhythmia, Cardiomyopathy, Ischemic Heart Disease, Endocarditis, Pericarditis, Abnormal Electrocardiogram, Hemopericardium, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders

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evening primrose, Primrose Oil, Evening Primrose Oil, capsicum