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Heart Disease News

Related terms: Congenital Heart Disease

Fitness in Youth Can Pay Off Decades Later: Study

Posted 21 hours ago by

MONDAY, Nov. 30, 2015 – Hitting the gym or playing field in your 20s may bring health benefits that last a lifetime, new research suggests. The study of nearly 5,000 young adults found that those with good heart/lung fitness had a lower risk of heart disease and death later in life. One cardiologist who reviewed the study wasn't surprised by the finding. "Despite all the remarkable medical and technological advances in the treatment of heart disease, it remains clear that the best prescription for adults is to be active and routinely exercise," said Dr. Kevin Marzo, chief of cardiology at Winthrop-University Hospital in Mineola, N.Y. The new study was led by Dr. Joao Lima of Johns Hopkins Medical School in Baltimore and focused on people who were between 18 and 30 at the start of the study. All of them underwent treadmill exercise tests to assess their cardiorespiratory fitness. Over a ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

Too Much Sitting Hurts Heart Patients' Health

Posted 2 days 1 hour ago by

THURSDAY, Nov. 26, 2015 – Even with regular exercise, people with heart disease who sit too much have worse health than those who sit less, a new study suggests. Previous research has linked too much sitting with an increased risk of heart disease. But the authors of this study say it's the first to examine the impact of too much sitting on people who already have heart disease. The study included 278 heart disease patients who had been taught how to increase their exercise levels. For nine days, they wore monitors that recorded their activity levels. The researchers also assessed various indicators of health including body mass index (BMI) and heart-lung fitness. These heart patients spent an average of eight hours a day sitting, the study found. On average, men sat an hour more daily than women, mostly because women engaged in more light intensity activity such as housework or ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Angina, Myocardial Infarction, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

Obesity in Youth May Harm the Heart Long-Term, Even After Weight Loss

Posted 6 days ago by

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 25, 2015 – A new study finds that even if overweight or obese young women slim down later on, obesity-linked damage to the heart may linger for decades. The research shows that even formerly overweight women remain at heightened risk for sudden cardiac death later in life. So, "it is important to maintain a healthy weight throughout adulthood as a way to minimize the risk of sudden cardiac death," lead author Stephanie Chiuve, assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, said in a news release from JACC: Clinical Electrophysiology. The study was published in the journal Nov. 25. In their research, Chiuve's team tracked outcomes for more than 72,000 healthy American women followed from 1980 to 2012. The women provided information about their weight and height when they were age 18. Their body mass index (BMI - an estimate of body fat based on weight and ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Heart Disease, Weight Loss, Heart Failure, Congestive Heart Failure, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

High 'Resting' Heart Rate Tied to Higher Odds of Early Death

Posted 8 days ago by

MONDAY, Nov. 23, 2015 – A rapid "resting" heartbeat might mean you have a higher risk of dying early, researchers suggest. "Higher resting heart rate is an independent predictor of all-cause and cardiovascular death," said lead researcher Dr. Dongfeng Zhang, of the department of epidemiology at the Medical College of Qingdao University in Shandong, China. Your resting heart rate, or pulse, is the number of times your heart beats a minute. When you're seated or lying down and relaxed, a normal heart rate is between 60 and 100 beats a minute, according to the American Heart Association. Zhang's team analyzed 46 studies involving more than 2 million patients in all. Compared to people with the lowest resting heart rate, those with a resting heart rate of more than 80 beats a minute had a 45 percent greater risk of death from any cause, while people with a resting heart rate of 60 to 80 ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Tachyarrhythmia, Supraventricular Tachycardia, Ventricular Tachycardia, Ventricular Arrhythmia, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Paroxysmal Supraventricular Tachycardia, Atrial Tachycardia, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Abnormal Electrocardiogram, Paroxysmal Junctional Tachycardia

Sleep Cycle Changes May Affect Your Health

Posted 13 days ago by

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 18, 2015 – Waking early on workdays and sleeping in on days off may not be as restful as you think: a new study suggests that when routine sleep habits are disrupted, your risk for diabetes and heart disease rises. The study included 447 men and women, aged 30 to 54, who worked at least 25 hours a week outside the home. They each wore a wristband that recorded their sleep and movement 24 hours a day for a week. Questionnaires were used to assess their exercise and eating habits. Nearly 85 percent of the participants slept longer on their days off than on workdays, the investigators found. The rest woke earlier on their days off than on workdays. Those with large differences in their sleep schedules on workdays and free days tended to have worse cholesterol and fasting insulin levels, greater insulin resistance, larger waist size, and higher body mass index (BMI), the ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Heart Disease, Shift Work Sleep Disorder, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Ischemic Heart Disease

Angioplasty May Not Boost Survival for Some Heart Disease Patients

Posted 20 days ago by

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11, 2015 – Angioplasty – the procedure used to open narrowed or blocked arteries – doesn't seem to lengthen life for people with stable heart disease and chest pain, a new study finds. After 15 years of follow-up, the study found that people who had angioplasty fared no better than those who had their heart disease treated with medication and lifestyle changes alone. "[Angioplasty and] stenting is effective and improves survival when performed early in the course of a heart attack," said lead researcher Dr. Steven Sedlis, an associate professor of medicine at NYU Medical School in New York City. "But the benefits of routine [angioplasty and] stenting for patients with stable heart disease have been uncertain and highly controversial." During the angioplasty procedure, a small tube may be placed in the blood vessel to keep it open. This is called stenting. Routine ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Angina, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Angina Pectoris Prophylaxis, Acute Coronary Syndrome, Ischemic Heart Disease, Percutaneous Coronary Intervention, Acute Coronary Syndrome - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome, Coronary Arteriography, High Risk Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty

New Medicare Rules Triple Heart Failure Patients' Access to Cardiac Rehab

Posted 11 Nov 2015 by

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11, 2015 – Newly expanded Medicare and Medicaid coverage for cardiac rehabilitation has tripled the number of heart failure patients with access to these lifesaving programs, a new study has found. But coverage could stand to be even further expanded, the researchers concluded. "There are a lot of new patients eligible, but we left out this whole huge bucket of patients," said lead researcher Dr. Jacob Kelly, a heart physician at the Duke University School of Medicine, in Durham, N.C. "Now the question is, what should we do with this group?" Cardiac rehabilitation is a medically supervised program that helps people with heart problems improve the quality of their lives, according to the American Heart Association (AHA). Heart patients in cardiac rehabilitation participate in exercise training, take classes on heart healthy living, and receive counseling to help them ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Failure, Congestive Heart Failure, Left Ventricular Dysfunction, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders

Bystander CPR Helps Some Kids Survive Cardiac Arrest

Posted 10 Nov 2015 by

TUESDAY, Nov. 10, 2015 – More American children who suffer cardiac arrest at home or in public places are getting CPR from bystanders, a new study finds. Kids who receive bystander CPR have better survival rates, the researchers said. But, the study didn't find an impact on infant survival rates. "This lack of impact on infants suggests the need for a public health strategy to improve the use of bystander CPR," study lead author Dr. Maryam Naim said in an American Heart Association news release. Naim is an assistant professor of anesthesiology and critical care at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia at the University of Pennsylvania. Cardiac arrest is the sudden loss of heart function in someone who may or may not have diagnosed heart disease. Each year, more than 420,000 emergency medical services-assessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur in the United States, according to ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Ventricular Arrhythmia, Cardiac Arrhythmia, AV Heart Block, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis, Post MI Syndrome, Abnormal Electrocardiogram

Some Kids With Heart Defects Struggle in School

Posted 10 Nov 2015 by

TUESDAY, Nov. 10, 2015 – Children born with heart defects often do worse in school than their peers, a new study finds. Researchers led by Dr. Matthew Oster of Children's Healthcare of Atlanta analyzed end-of-grade test results for third-grade students in North Carolina public schools between 1998 and 2003. Compared to other children, those with a congenital heart defect were 40 percent less likely to meet reading proficiency standards, 20 percent less likely to meet math standards, and 50 percent less likely to meet standards in both subjects, the study found. The researchers also found that 2.8 percent of children with heart defects were held back in third-grade, compared with 1.9 percent of other children. Two experts in pediatric care who reviewed the new findings weren't surprised. "Children with congenital heart disease have long been known to be at increased risk for later ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Delivery, Cesarean Section, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Heart Transplant Mental Toll May Be Greater for Women

Posted 10 Nov 2015 by

TUESDAY, Nov. 10, 2015 – Women may have more mental stress after a heart transplant than men, a new study finds. Heart transplant patients with higher levels of mental stress are less likely to take medications as prescribed and are at higher risk for infection, the researchers noted. The study looked at 91 heart transplant patients, almost one-third of them women, in the first 100 days after they received their new heart. The researchers found that high levels of depression were experienced by 39 percent of women, compared to 15 percent of men. High levels of anxiety occurred in more than three-quarters of women, versus 46 percent of men. Women also felt they had less control over their health than men, according to the study that was to be presented Tuesday at the American Heart Association's annual meeting in Orlando, Fla. Health care providers should monitor heart transplant ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Organ Transplant - Rejection Prophylaxis, Organ Transplant, Ischemic Heart Disease, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Graft-versus-host disease

Football Linemen at Higher Risk for Heart Troubles, Study Finds

Posted 10 Nov 2015 by

TUESDAY, Nov. 10, 2015 – The heart health of football players might depend on the position they play, with linemen facing a greater risk for certain heart problems compared with their other teammates, a new Harvard study suggests. College football linemen tended to have higher blood pressure than other players, along with an increase in the thickness of their heart muscle wall, said lead researcher Dr. Jeffrey Lin, a former cardiology fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. "Over the course of just one season, there was an increase in the incidence of high blood pressure among football players, and the linemen tended to be affected the most," Lin said. "They developed thicker walls of their heart muscle, and they had decreases in the function of their heart as well." These differences likely are due to the demands of a lineman position, said Lin, who is now a cardiac ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Hypertensive Heart Disease

Obese Kids as Young as 8 Show Signs of Heart Disease

Posted 10 Nov 2015 by

TUESDAY, Nov. 10, 2015 – Obese children can develop signs of heart abnormalities as young as age 8, which might drive up their risk for early death as adults, new research suggests. "It is both surprising and alarming to us that even the youngest obese children in our study who were 8 years old had evidence of heart disease," said study lead author Linyuan Jing, a postdoctoral fellow with Geisinger Health System in Danville, Pa. "Ultimately, we hope that the effects we see in the hearts of these children are reversible," Jing added. "However, it is possible that there could be permanent damage." For the study, Jing's team conducted MRI scans of 40 children between 8 and 16 years old. Half were obese; half were of normal weight. The obese kids had an average of 27 percent more muscle mass in the left ventricle region of their heart, and 12 percent thicker heart muscle overall. Both are ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Heart Disease, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders

Lower Blood Pressure Target Could Save Lives: Study

Posted 9 Nov 2015 by

MONDAY, Nov. 9, 2015 – Millions of Americans could avoid heart disease if doctors controlled their high blood pressure more aggressively than previously recommended, a groundbreaking study contends. The SPRINT trial has revealed that a target systolic blood pressure of 120 reduces by about one-quarter the rate of death, heart attack, heart failure and stroke, compared with the currently recommended target pressures of 140 for people under age 60 and 150 for seniors. "This is, in my view, the most important blood pressure study of the last 40 years," Dr. Dan Jones, a past president of the American Heart Association, said during a presentation on SPRINT Monday at the association's annual meeting in Orlando, Fla. The final results were also published in the New England Journal of Medicine, to coincide with the meeting presentation. Systolic pressure is the top of the two blood pressure ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Heart Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Cardiac Concerns Not High on Women's Lists: Survey

Posted 9 Nov 2015 by

SUNDAY, Nov. 8, 2015 – Heart disease is the leading cause of death among American women, but few feel a personal link with the disease, new research shows. A 2014 nationwide survey of more than 1,000 women between the ages of 25 and 60 found that only 27 percent could name a woman in their lives with heart disease and only 11 percent could name a woman who died from it. Age made a difference. Among those between 50 and 60 years of age, 37 percent knew a woman with heart disease, compared with 23 percent of the younger group. Respondents who knew a woman with heart disease were 25 percent more likely to be concerned about it for themselves and 19 percent more likely to bring up heart health with their doctors, the Women's Heart Alliance survey found. The study was to be presented Sunday at the American Heart Association's annual meeting in Orlando, Fla. Research presented at meetings is ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Heart Disease Deaths Declining Among Those With Rheumatoid Arthritis: Study

Posted 9 Nov 2015 by

SUNDAY, Nov. 8, 2015 – Heart disease-related deaths among Americans with rheumatoid arthritis are on the decline, according to a new study. Rheumatoid arthritis patients are two times more likely than the average person to develop heart disease, but the new research finds that efforts to prevent, diagnose and treat heart disease at an early stage in these patients are paying off. Mayo Clinic researchers analyzed heart disease deaths within 10 years of rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis for two groups of people. The first group included 315 people diagnosed between 2000 and 2007. The second group included 498 people diagnosed in the 1980s and 1990s. About two-thirds of the patients were women and their average age was 60. Between 2000 and 2007, 2.8 percent died of heart disease, compared to 7.9 percent in the 1980s and 1990s, according to the findings, which are to be presented Sunday at ... Read more

Related support groups: Rheumatoid Arthritis, Heart Disease

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