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Heart Disease Blog

Related terms: Congenital Heart Disease

More Evidence Ties Heart Disease to Mental Decline

Posted 28 Jan 2013 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 28 – Researchers have yet again tied heart disease and poor circulation to mental declines in older people, especially women. The new study, published online Jan. 28 in the journal JAMA Neurology, looked at early signs of mental decline that might predict later dementia. Researchers led by Rosebud Roberts of the Mayo Clinic examined the cardiovascular and mental health of 1,450 people, aged 70 to 89. They found that nearly one-fourth of the patients developed what is known as mild cognitive impairment (MCI) over an average of four years of follow-up. People with MCI have memory or other thinking problems but do not have full-blown dementia. There are different subtypes of MCI, some of which involve memory loss and some of which do not. In the new study, the Mayo team found that a history of heart disease was strongly associated with a form of MCI that involves poorer ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment

High BPA Levels in Kids Linked to Risk for Heart, Kidney Damage: Study

Posted 9 Jan 2013 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 9 – According to a new study, there are signs that elevated levels of the plastics chemical bisphenol A in children's urine are associated with an increased risk of heart and kidney disease. Bisphenol A (BPA) is widely used in consumer products, including as an internal covering in aluminum food cans. Research has suggested that BPA disrupts human metabolism. In this study, researchers at the New York University School of Medicine analyzed data from more than 700 children and teens aged 6 to 19 who participated in the 2009-2010 U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The data included levels of BPA and a protein called albumin in the participants' urine. The presence of albumin in urine is a sign of kidney damage. Children and teens with the highest BPA levels in their urine had a higher albumin-to-creatinine ratio than those with the lowest BPA levels. A ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Renal Failure, Chronic Kidney Disease

Inconsistency Seen in Safety Labeling for Generic Drugs

Posted 21 Dec 2012 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 21 – More than two-thirds of generic drugs in the United States have safety warning labels that differ from the equivalent brand-name drugs, a new study finds. These labels break U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations that require generic drugs to carry warnings that are identical to those on brand-name drugs. Researchers reviewed more than 9,000 product labels for more than 1,500 drugs listed on DailyMed, a website about drug-labeling information that is maintained by the FDA and the U.S. National Library of Medicine. Of more than 1,000 generic drugs, 68 percent had some discrepancies in their safety labeling. Most had small differences in their labels compared to brand-name drugs, but 9 percent had differences of more than 10 side effects. Other labeling errors included out-of-date information, incomplete data and, in one case, information for another drug, ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Diabetes, Type 2, Heart Disease

Heart Health Worst in the South, Best in Northeast

Posted 19 Dec 2012 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 19 – Residents of several Southern states are among the most likely to have poor heart health in the United States, a new study finds. But the country as a whole is having trouble. Only about 3 percent of U.S. adults surveyed who don't have heart problems managed to meet all of seven criteria for cardiac well-being, such as ideal levels of weight, blood pressure, physical activity and diet. On the other side, nearly 10 percent of those surveyed were in poor shape heart-wise, meeting two or fewer of the requirements. That number reached 16 percent in West Virginia, 14 percent in Alabama, Mississippi and Kentucky, and 13 percent in Louisiana. "Disparity continues to exist in cardiovascular health in America, not just by social demographics like race, gender, age and education level, but also by state," said study lead author Dr. Jing Fang, an epidemiologist with the U.S. ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders

Yo-Yo Dieting Can Hurt the Heart, Study Finds

Posted 13 Dec 2012 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 13 – Older women who lose weight and gain it back again may be increasing their risk for heart disease, Wake Forest University researchers report. Although cholesterol, blood pressure, triglycerides and blood sugar all improve with weight loss, with weight regain they all return to pre-diet levels and, in some cases, to even higher levels, the researchers found. "For postmenopausal women considering weight loss, maintaining weight loss is just as important as losing weight," said lead researcher Daniel Beavers, an assistant professor in the department of biostatistics and public health sciences at Wake Forest University School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, N.C. "Even partial weight regain is associated with worsened diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors." In an earlier study of these same women, the researchers found that those who regained weight during the year ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease

Fainting in Healthy People May Be First Sign of Heart Trouble

Posted 12 Dec 2012 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 12 – Fainting isn't fun. For those who have ever suddenly and briefly lost consciousness, it's a disconcerting situation that typically triggers a thorough medical workup. Unfortunately, it's often tough for physicians to determine just what caused a first fainting episode. A large new Danish study provides a nationwide picture of how one-time fainters fare over several years. The researchers found these people were 74 percent more likely to eventually be admitted to the hospital for heart attack or stroke and five times more likely to need a pacemaker or implantable cardioverter-defibrillator at some point in the future. The study suggests that even low-risk people who faint need to be carefully evaluated. "Patients, relatives and clinicians should be aware that syncope [fainting] in seemingly healthy people is associated with higher risks of death and that syncope may ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease

Kids With HIV at Risk of Heart Disease, Study Says

Posted 5 Dec 2012 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 5 – Children infected with HIV are at increased risk for hardening of the arteries and require cholesterol-lowering drugs and healthy lifestyle habits to prevent early death from cardiovascular disease, according to a new study. Thickening and hardening of the arteries is known as atherosclerosis. In this study, researchers assessed 150 children and teens with HIV, the AIDS-causing virus, and 150 healthy youngsters. Those with HIV were two-and-a-half times more likely to have higher levels of a biological indicator of atherosclerosis than those without HIV. The findings were scheduled for presentation Wednesday at the annual meeting of the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging in Athens, Greece. "Our study shows that children and adolescents with HIV have arteries that are more rigid and less elastic, which means that the process of atherosclerosis has begun ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, HIV Infection

Healthy Diet May Prevent Additional Heart Trouble

Posted 3 Dec 2012 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 3 – People suffering from heart disease who eat a heart-healthy diet may reduce their odds of having a heart attack or stroke, a new Canadian study suggests. Those benefits came on top of those seen from taking heart medications, such as statins, blood pressure drugs and aspirin, the researchers noted. "It is a very common misconception that medications for heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and other cardiovascular problems will solve or cure the issues at hand," said Samantha Heller, clinical nutrition coordinator at the Center for Cancer Care at Griffin Hospital in Derby, Conn. "The medications give patients a false sense of protection and security," said Heller, who was not involved with the study. "Many times, physicians do not emphasize the importance of a healthy lifestyle makeover. Thus, patients tend to ignore general dietary and exercise ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

High Blood Pressure During Pregnancy Tied to Later Heart Trouble

Posted 27 Nov 2012 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 27 – Single-child mothers who develop preeclampsia during their pregnancy are more likely to die from heart disease later in life than mothers with multiple children who developed the blood pressure condition during their first pregnancy, a large, new study suggests. The study was published online Nov. 27 in the journal BMJ. This is the first time that this increased risk among single-child mothers has been reported and suggests that these women require special monitoring, according to a journal news release. Preeclampsia is a serious condition in which high blood pressure and protein in the mother's urine develop in the second half of pregnancy. Researchers looked at data from more than 836,000 Norwegian women who gave birth to their first child between 1967 and 2009. By 2009, nearly 3,900 of the women had died from heart disease. Overall, women with preeclampsia in ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Toxemia of pregnancy

Routine Checkups Don't Cut Cancer, Heart Deaths: Study

Posted 21 Nov 2012 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 20 – Routine checkups don't help reduce a patient's risk of dying from either heart disease or cancer, new Danish research suggests. The finding applies to doctor visits among the general population, in which seemingly healthy patients, without any specific disease risk, come in on a regular basis for an array of standardized screenings and lifestyle counseling. The goal of such checkups is to catch early signs of disease and thereby reduce the risk for early death. But the fresh review of 14 previous studies involving nearly 183,000 patients uncovered no evidence that such checkups do anything of the sort. On the contrary, the research team found that routine checkups of healthy people may actually promote the use of potentially harmful invasive testing while at the same time leading to overdiagnosis and unnecessary treatment. "We could not find evidence of benefit from ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Heart Disease

More Gene Variants Linked to Heart Trouble

Posted 8 Nov 2012 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 8 – Specific DNA variations explain more than 10 percent of the inherited genetic risk for developing heart disease, a new study suggests. Researchers discovered 20 previously unidentified genetic variations in more than 63,000 people with coronary artery disease, which causes more deaths worldwide than any other disease. These variations were uncommon in a control group of more than 130,000 people without heart disease. The newly identified mutations bring to 47 the total number of genetic variations that have so far been linked to an increased risk for developing heart disease, according to study co-leader Panos Deloukas, head of the Genetics of Complex Traits in Humans research group at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, in Cambridge, England. One previous study estimated that 30 percent to 60 percent of heart disease cases might be attributable to genetic risk ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease

Too Much Sitting Linked to Fat Buildup Around the Heart

Posted 8 Nov 2012 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 8 – All those hours Americans spend in their office chairs or on their sofas may be packing on a particularly unhealthy form of fat around the heart, a new study suggests. What's more, the fat stayed in place even when people undertook regular exercise, according to a study reported this week in Los Angeles at the annual meeting of the American Heart Association. CT scans of more than 500 older Americans found that excess time spent sitting "was significantly related to pericardial fat around your heart," said study lead author Britta Larsen, a postdoctoral researcher in the department of cardiovascular epidemiology at the University of California, San Diego. There have been numerous large studies recently suggesting that when it comes to its deleterious health effects, sitting is not just the absence of physical activity – it has effects on the body that go beyond lack ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders

Winter Brings Rise in Heart-Related Deaths, Study Finds

Posted 6 Nov 2012 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 6 – Heart-related deaths increase across the United States in winter, even in areas with warmer climates, a new study found. Researchers analyzed data on deaths between 2005 and 2008 in seven locations with different climates: Arizona, Georgia, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Texas, Washington and Los Angeles County, Calif. In all seven areas, the total number of deaths and heart-related deaths – caused by heart attack, heart failure, cardiovascular disease and stroke – averaged 26 percent to 36 percent higher in winter than in summer. The seasonal patterns of total and heart-related deaths were similar in the seven different climate areas, according to the researchers at Good Samaritan Hospital in Los Angeles. The study was to be presented Tuesday at the American Heart Association annual meeting in Los Angeles. The researchers didn't look at the specific reasons why ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction

Could an Aging Face Reflect an Unhealthy Heart?

Posted 6 Nov 2012 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 6 – Anxious about those telltale signs of aging? A new study gives you one more reason to worry: Facial aging might point to worsening cardiovascular health. The Danish study found that people who had three or four signs of aging – fatty deposits around the eyelids, receding hairlines, baldness, and creased earlobes – were 39 percent more likely to develop heart disease and 57 percent more likely to have a heart attack over 35 years of follow-up, compared to people of similar age who looked younger. "Looking old for your age is a good marker for poor cardiovascular health," said study lead author Dr. Anne Tybjaerg-Hansen, a professor of clinical biochemistry at the University of Copenhagen. She presented the findings Tuesday in Los Angeles at the annual meeting of the American Heart Association (AHA). According to Tybjaerg-Hansen, many doctors explicitly or ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders

Many U.S. Hispanics Have Heart Disease Risk Factors

Posted 5 Nov 2012 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 5 – Many Hispanic adults in the United States have major risk factors for cardiovascular disease, a new study reveals. The researchers also found that Hispanics born in the United States are more likely to have multiple cardiovascular disease risk factors and a history of coronary heart disease and stroke, compared to those born outside the country. The study was published online Nov. 5 and in the Nov. 7 print issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, and was to be presented Monday at the American Heart Association's annual meeting in Los Angeles. Researchers looked at data from more than 16,000 Hispanic men and women, ages 18 to 74, with Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, Central American and South American backgrounds. Eighty percent of men and 71 percent of women had at least one risk factor for cardiovascular disease, such as high cholesterol, ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Disease, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

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Arrhythmia, Cardiomyopathy, Ischemic Heart Disease, Endocarditis, Pericarditis, Abnormal Electrocardiogram, Hemopericardium, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders

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