lacosamide

Pronunciation

Generic Name: lacosamide (la KOE sa mide)
Brand Name: Vimpat

What is lacosamide?

Lacosamide is an anti-epileptic drug, also called an anticonvulsant.

Lacosamide is used together with other medications to treat partial-onset seizures in people with epilepsy who are at least 17 years old.

Lacosamide may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about lacosamide?

Follow all directions on your medicine label and package. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all your medical conditions, allergies, and all medicines you use.

Slideshow: Flashback: FDA Drug Approvals 2013

What should I discuss with my health care provider before taking lacosamide?

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to lacosamide.

To make sure lacosamide is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

  • kidney disease;

  • liver disease;

  • a history of depression, suicidal thoughts or actions, or drug or alcohol abuse;

  • nerve problems caused by diabetes; or

  • a serious heart condition such as "sick sinus syndrome" or "AV block" (unless you have a pacemaker), heart failure, or other severe heart disorder.

Some people have thoughts about suicide while taking lacosamide. Your doctor will need to check your progress at regular visits. Your family or other caregivers should also be alert to changes in your mood or symptoms.

Call your doctor if you have new or worsening depression or suicidal thoughts during the first several months of treatment, or whenever your dose is changed.

FDA pregnancy category C. Do not start or stop taking lacosamide during pregnancy without your doctor's advice. Having a seizure during pregnancy could harm both mother and baby. Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant while taking lacosamide for seizures.

If you are pregnant, your name may be listed on a pregnancy registry. This is to track the outcome of the pregnancy and to evaluate any effects of lacosamide on the baby.

It is not known whether lacosamide passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while using this medicine.

The liquid form may contain phenylalanine. Talk to your doctor before using this form of lacosamide if you have phenylketonuria (PKU).

Do not give this medicine to a child younger than 17 years old.

How should I take lacosamide?

Follow all directions on your prescription label. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results. Do not take this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Lacosamide can be taken with or without food.

Measure liquid medicine with a special dose-measuring spoon or medicine cup. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Do not stop using lacosamide suddenly, even if you feel fine. Stopping suddenly may cause increased seizures. Follow your doctor's instructions about tapering your dose.

Contact your doctor if your seizures get worse or you have them more often while taking lacosamide.

Wear a medical alert tag or carry an ID card stating that you take lacosamide. Any medical care provider who treats you should know that you take seizure medication.

Use lacosamide regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Do not freeze the liquid form of lacosamide.

Keep track of the amount of medicine used from each new bottle. Lacosamide is a drug of abuse and you should be aware if anyone is using your medicine improperly or without a prescription.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking lacosamide?

Lacosamide may cause blurred vision or impair your balance, thinking, or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert and able to see clearly.

Lacosamide side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Report any new or worsening symptoms to your doctor, such as: mood or behavior changes, depression, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, or if you feel impulsive, irritable, agitated, hostile, aggressive, restless, hyperactive (mentally or physically), or have thoughts about suicide or hurting yourself.

Stop using lacosamide and call your doctor at once if you have:

  • double vision, hallucinations;

  • a light-headed feeling, like you might pass out;

  • fast or pounding heartbeats, fluttering in your chest;

  • shortness of breath;

  • fever, skin rash, swollen glands, flu symptoms;

  • bruising, severe tingling, numbness, pain, muscle weakness;

  • nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or

  • lower back pain, cloudy or bloody urine, swelling, rapid weight gain, urinating less than usual.

Common side effects may include:

  • mild dizziness;

  • loss of balance or coordination;

  • headache; or

  • mild skin rash.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1 800 FDA 1088.

See also: Side effects (in more detail)

Lacosamide dosing information

Usual Adult Dose for Seizures:

Lacosamide can be initiated with either oral or intravenous administration.

Initial dose: 50 mg twice daily (100 mg per day). Lacosamide can be increased at weekly intervals by 100 mg/day given as two divided doses up to the recommended maintenance dose of 200 to 400 mg/day, based on individual patient response and tolerability. In clinical trials, the 600 mg daily dose was not more effective than the 400 mg daily dose, and was associated with a substantially higher rate of adverse reactions.

Oral lacosamide may be taken with or without food.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Seizures:

17 years of age and older:

Lacosamide can be initiated with either oral or intravenous administration.

Initial dose: 50 mg twice daily (100 mg per day). Lacosamide can be increased at weekly intervals by 100 mg/day given as two divided doses up to the recommended maintenance dose of 200 to 400 mg/day, based on individual patient response and tolerability. In clinical trials, the 600 mg daily dose was not more effective than the 400 mg daily dose, and was associated with a substantially higher rate of adverse reactions.

Oral lacosamide may be taken with or without food.

What other drugs will affect lacosamide?

Other drugs may interact with lacosamide, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell each of your health care providers about all medicines you use now and any medicine you start or stop using.

Where can I get more information?

  • Your pharmacist can provide more information about lacosamide.
  • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.
  • Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2012 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 3.01. Revision Date: 2013-03-20, 8:41:34 PM.

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