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New York, New Jersey to Quarantine All Travelers With Ebola Contacts

Posted today in Daily MedNews

SATURDAY, Oct. 25, 2014 -- On Friday, the governors of New York and New Jersey announced strict new quarantine measures for anyone returning via Kennedy and Newark Liberty airports who may have had contacts with Ebola patients in Guinea, Liberia or Sierra Leona. The measures, which exceed current federal guidelines, mean that people who had such contacts would be tested and kept in quarantine for 21 days, the longest known length of incubation of the Ebola virus. The rules were announced Friday...

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Tips for Safe Trick-or-Treating

Posted today in Daily MedNews

SATURDAY, Oct. 25, 2014 -- Arriving home safe and sound is one of the best Halloween treats of all. To that end, be sure that costumes and goody bags have reflective strips that improve visibility to drivers, said Dr. Sampson Davis, an emergency medicine doctor at Meadowlands Hospital Medical Center in Secaucus, N.J. Trick-or-treaters should also carry a flashlight, and costumes should be flame-resistant, Davis said. He offers these others tips: If you plan to use makeup, test it on a small...

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Dark Days Here for Folks With Seasonal Depression

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Oct. 24, 2014 -- October's shorter, darker days can trigger a type of depression, known as seasonal affective disorder, according to an expert. People affected by seasonal affective disorder, also called SAD, may feel overly tired, lack motivation and even have trouble getting out of bed. In extreme cases, SAD can lead to suicide, said Dr. Angelos Halaris, a professor in the department of psychiatry and behavioral neurosciences at Loyola University Chicago Stitch School of...

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Knowing Genetic Risk for Cancer May Not Change Behavior

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Oct. 24, 2014 -- As more genetic tests are developed that spot increased risks for certain cancers, one might think that high-risk people would be more proactive about getting screened. But a new study suggests that, at least with colon cancer, knowledge does not change behavior: People who found out their genes doubled their risk of colon cancer were no more likely than people with average risk to get screened. "It didn't make any difference, not at all," said study author Dr. David...

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Osteoporosis Screening Guidelines May Miss Younger Women at Risk

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Oct. 23, 2014 -- Current osteoporosis screening guidelines and tools fail to identify many younger postmenopausal women at risk for osteoporosis-related fractures, a new study says. "If we want to prevent fractures, we need tools that help us accurately predict who will suffer these osteoporotic injuries so that we can target these at-risk people for preventive measures," study author Dr. Carolyn Crandall, professor of medicine in the division of general internal medicine and health...

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Few U.S. Hospitals Ready to Handle Ebola, Survey Finds

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Oct. 24, 2014 -- Only about 6 percent of American hospitals have infection control procedures in place to effectively and safely handle Ebola patients, a new survey reveals. Of the 1,039 acute care hospitals that responded to the survey, about 6 percent said they were "well-prepared," and about 5 percent said they were "not prepared," according to the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC). "The results of the poll paint a disturbing picture, and...

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Researchers Say Antibiotics in Fish a Health Concern

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Oct. 24, 2014 -- Researchers who discovered antibiotics in farmed and wild fish say their findings are cause for concern. The use of antibiotics in animals, including fish, that are raised for human consumption contribute to the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria that threaten people's health, according to background information from the study. Each year in the United States, antibiotic-resistant germs sicken about 2 million people and kill about 23,000, according to the...

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Sleep Duration Linked to Ulcerative Colitis Risk in Study

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Oct. 24, 2014 -- Not getting the right amount of sleep might raise your risk of ulcerative colitis, a new study suggests. Those who sleep less or more than the recommended seven to eight hours per night may be more prone to developing the chronic condition, which causes inflammation in the intestines, researchers report. The study authors concluded that duration and quality of sleep are key factors to be considered among patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. "Both short and long...

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Studies Link Cold Sore Virus to Alzheimer's Risk

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Oct. 24, 2014 -- The virus that causes common cold sores -- herpes simplex -- might increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease, two studies by Swedish researchers suggest. In fact, being a carrier of certain antibodies to the virus can double the risk of Alzheimer's disease, the researchers found. "The identification of a treatable cause [herpes simplex] of the most common dementia disorder is a breakthrough," said lead researcher Dr. Hugo Lovheim, an associate professor in the...

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Brief Interruption of Blood Supply to Limb Might Aid Heart Surgery: Study

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Oct. 24, 2014 -- Interrupting blood supply to an arm or a leg before heart surgery may help reduce the risks associated with the surgery, according to a new study. "During heart surgery we have to stop the blood supply to the heart to be able to operate on it. After some time without fresh blood, the heart will reduce its ability to produce energy because it doesn't get oxygen. When we shut off the blood flow to another large muscle, such as an arm or a leg, the body prepares for an...

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Could Air Pollutants Raise a Child's Autism Risk?

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Oct. 24, 2014 -- Children exposed to two air toxins -- chromium and styrene -- while in the womb and during the first two years of life may have increased odds of developing autism, according to a new study. Prenatal and early exposure to the highest amounts of chromium, a heavy metal, increased the risk for autism by 65 percent, said researchers from the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. Styrene, found in car exhaust and industrial emissions, doubled the risk...

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New Treatment Obizur Approved for Rare Form of Hemophilia

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Oct. 24, 2014 -- Obizur (antihemophilic factor recombinant) has been approved to treat a rare, non-inherited form of hemophilia in adults. Unlike the more common form of hemophilia that's inherited and affects males, acquired hemophilia affects both males and females. The rarer form of the blood disorder occurs when the body's immune system attacks a protein that's necessary for normal blood clotting. About half the cases of acquired hemophilia are related to other medical conditions,...

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Nurse Nina Pham Declared 'Free' of Ebola Virus

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Oct. 24, 2014 -- Nina Pham, the first of two Dallas nurses to be infected with Ebola while caring for a patient, is now free of the virus, officials at the U.S. National Institutes of Health announced Friday. Pham, 26, has been treated at a special isolation unit at the NIH's Clinical Center in Bethesda, Md., since being moved there from Dallas on Oct. 12, NBC News reported. She and a second nurse, Amber Vinson, 29, contracted Ebola while helping to treat Thomas Eric Duncan at Texas...

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Cadavers Beat Computers as Med School Teaching Tool, Study Finds

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Oct. 24, 2014 -- Cadavers are better than a computer simulation of the human body for teaching anatomy to college students, a new study says. The findings suggest that cadavers should continue to be used in undergraduate human anatomy courses for future doctors, nurses and other health and medical professionals, according to the researchers. Their study included almost 240 students in a semester-long undergraduate anatomy course. One group of students learned on a cadaver and were...

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Childhood Peanut Allergy May Be Linked to Skin Gene Mutation

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Oct. 24, 2014 -- Infants with a specific skin gene mutation who are exposed to peanut protein in household dust may be more likely to develop a peanut allergy, according to a new study. Peanut allergy and other food allergies have been linked to severe eczema, a skin disorder, in early infancy, the U.K. researchers said. In conducting the study, researchers at King's College London and colleagues examined the amount of peanut protein to which 577 babies were exposed during their first...

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Health Highlights: Oct. 24, 2014

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: Surgeons Transplant First Non-Beating Heart Surgeons in Australia say they successfully transplanted a heart that had stopped beating for up to 20 minutes. Until now, heart transplants have only been able to use still-beating hearts from brain-dead donors. But a surgical team at St. Vincent's Hospital in Sydney took a non-beating donor heart and revived it in a machine called a...

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Teens Who Dine With Their Families May Be Slimmer Adults

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Oct. 24, 2014 -- For those teens who try to avoid spending time with their parents and siblings, new research suggests that sitting down for family meals might help them stay slim as adults. Despite everyone's busy schedules, researchers found that just one or two gatherings around the kitchen table each week were well worth the effort. "There are numerous distractions that could keep families from having family meals. However, this study shows that even trying to have a few family...

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Multiple Drug Use Raises Infection Risk for 'Swinging' Couples

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Oct. 24, 2014 -- Multiple drug use put couples who "swing" at increased risk for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), a new study shows. Swingers are defined as heterosexual couples who have group sex, swap partners and/or visit sex clubs for couples. Researchers looked at 289 people, average age 49, in the Netherlands who said they were swingers and visited an STD clinic between 2009 and 2012. Half of the participants said they'd had six or more sex partners in the last six months,...

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Health Tip: When Your Child Needs to Lose Weight

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

-- If your child is overweight, be sure to teach him or her about the importance of a nutritious diet and regular exercise. You also should offer plenty of support and avoid pressuring your youngster. The Weight-loss Information Network offers these additional suggestions: Put your child on a weight-loss plan only after getting your doctor's approval. Don't severely restrict what your growing child eats. Give your child's self-esteem a lift by loving and accepting your child, no matter...

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Health Tip: Watch the Road on Halloween

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

-- On Halloween, excited trick-or-treaters can pose significant hazards for drivers, especially in residential areas. The U.S. National Safety Council offers these safety tips: Be extra alert and cautious on Halloween, remembering to watch for children near the roads. Look out for children darting between parked cars. Use caution when entering and exiting alleys and driveways. Watch for children in dark clothing during twilight and later hours. Stay off of your cell phone while...

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