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Wives' Higher Education May Not Affect Divorce Rate

Posted today in Daily MedNews

SUNDAY, July 27, 2014 -- Couples aren't more likely to get divorced if the wife has more education than the husband, new research finds. The study only looks at trends in marriage, it doesn't prove that education levels play a direct role in affecting whether couples stay together or get divorced. Still, "our results speak against fears that women's growing educational advantage over men has had negative effects on marital stability," Christine Schwartz, lead author of the study, said in an...

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Health Highlights: July 27, 2014

Posted today in Daily MedNews

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: U.S. Doctor Working in Liberia Is Infected With Ebola An American physician who was helping Ebola victims in the West African country of Liberia has himself become infected, the aid organization he was working with said on Saturday. According to the Associated Press, Dr Kent Brantly, 33, has tested positive for the highly contagious, often fatal viral disease and is currently being treated...

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Don't Let Kids Drink Pool Water

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

SATURDAY, July 26, 2014 -- Pools can provide much-needed relief from the summer heat, but kids can make themselves sick if they swallow too much chlorinated water, experts warn. Amid the splashing and excitement, it's common for little ones to get water in their mouth. Some kids may even take a drink from a pool, despite warnings from their parents. Although swallowing a small amount of pool water is harmless, it's important for parents to realize that ingesting too much can lead to chlorine...

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Distractions Seem More Troublesome With Age

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, July 25, 2014 -- Seniors are more easily distracted during thinking and memory tasks than younger people, a new study finds. "Almost any type of memory test administered reveals a decline in memory from the age of 25 on," study co-author Randi Martin, professor of psychology at Rice University, said in a university news release. However, Martin said, this study shows that "environmental interference" has a greater impact on processing in older adults compared with younger adults. The...

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Human Brain Has Coping Mechanism for Dehydration

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, July 25, 2014 -- The human brain can preserve oxygen to protect itself from the effects of dehydration, a new study finds. Although dehydration significantly reduces blood flow to the brain, researchers in England have found that the brain compensates by increasing the amount of oxygen it extracts from the blood. "This research has helped us understand a lot more about how the human brain responds to extreme exercise in extreme conditions," study first author Steven Trangmar, a...

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Lymphoma Treatment May Harm, Halt Men's Sperm Production

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, July 25, 2014 (HealthDay -- Treatment for lymphoma may lower men's fertility, new research indicates. Both Hodgkin lymphoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, which are cancers of the body's white blood cells, often affect young people who are still in their reproductive years. For men, treatment for these cancers can harm or halt sperm production. Although most men regain their fertility within two years of treatment, the researchers cautioned that men should be counseled about the possibility...

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Rhymes Reveal Evidence of Learning in the Womb

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, July 25, 2014 -- Babies seem to learn even before they're born, a new study suggests. By the time women are 34 weeks pregnant, their unborn babies can respond to the sound of their mother's voice reciting a familiar nursery rhyme, the researchers report. "The mother's voice is the predominant source of sensory stimulation in the developing fetus," Charlene Krueger, nursing researcher and associate professor in the University of Florida's College of Nursing, said in a university news...

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IRS Caps Fines on Uninsured Americans at $12K for Family of 5

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, July 25, 2014 -- U.S. taxpayers who go without health insurance this year will face fines of up to $2,448 per individual or $12,240 for a family of five, the Internal Revenue Service says. The Obama administration on Thursday announced an upper limit on the federal tax penalties that some Americans will owe for failing to have health insurance. The IRS cap is based on the monthly national average premium for a bronze-level health plan. The Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare as some...

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Most Adults Are Members of 'Clean Plate Club'

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, July 25, 2014 -- Unlike children, the vast majority of adults finish all of the food they put on their plate at mealtime, according to a new study. This is true for adults from much of the world -- not just Americans, researchers from Cornell University revealed. They noted their findings could help those trying to lose weight or improve their eating habits make better choices. "If you put it on your plate, it's going into your stomach," researcher Brian Wansink, director of the...

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Genes May Be Key to Language Delay in Kids

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, July 25, 2014 -- Twins' genes may play a greater role in language delay than their environment, according to a new study. Researchers found more evidence that language traits, such as vocabulary, putting words together and grammar, were largely inherited. The study involving 473 sets of twins revealed that the "twinning effect" (a lower level of language performance for twins than single-born children) was greater for identical twins than non-identical twins. "This finding disputes...

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Anal, Throat Cancers on the Rise Among Young Adults, Study Finds

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, July 25, 2014 -- Although cervical cancers are declining in the United States and Canada, other cancers linked to human papillomavirus (HPV) are increasing, a new study indicates. HPV-related cancers of the anus and the base of the tongue and tonsils have increased over the past 35 years, especially among men and women younger than 45, the Canadian researchers report. "The increases in the incidence of oropharyngeal [throat] cancer among younger men and of anal cancer among younger...

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The 'Hobby Lobby Ruling' and What It Means for U.S. Health Care

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, July 25, 2014 -- The U.S. Supreme Court's ruling on contraception coverage -- as mandated under the Affordable Care Act -- could lead to a legal quagmire that might allow companies to deny insurance coverage for any medical practice that violates their religious principles, some health care experts say. But other experts counter that such predictions are unlikely to come true. The justices ruled 5-4 last month that Hobby Lobby Stores Inc. and Conestoga Wood Specialties Corp. did not...

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Health Highlights: July 25, 2014

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: CDC Resumes Transfer of Biological Samples Between Labs The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday that it would allow the first transfer between its labs of potentially hazardous biological material since a ban on such shipments was put in place earlier this month. The ban followed revelations of recent incidents involving mishandling of potentially dangerous...

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Lift U.S. Ban on Blood Donations by Gay Men, Experts Say

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, July 25, 2014 -- The United States should repeal a 30-year policy that bans blood donations from gay and bisexual men, according to a team of medical and legal experts writing this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Currently, a man who has ever had sex with another man cannot donate blood in the United States -- a lifetime ban that has been in place since 1983. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration adopted this policy at the dawn of the AIDS crisis. However,...

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Diet Changes Can Alter Gut Bacteria, Study Says

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, July 25, 2014 -- Dietary changes can dramatically alter the balance of bacteria in the gut on a daily basis, according to a new study. These fluctuations could lead to monitoring systems that might help detect and ease flare-ups for people with certain chronic illnesses, such as inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease), the researchers said. Trillions of bacteria live in the digestive tract, but their effect on human health isn't well understood, the...

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Health Tip: Easing Headache Pain

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

-- Headache symptoms vary, from a sharp pain to a dull throb. Remedies to treat these symptoms are similarly numerous. The American Academy of Family Physicians offers these suggestions for managing and preventing headaches: Apply an ice pack or a heat wrap to your head or neck. Take a hot shower. Take a break from anything stressful. Don't skip breakfast or any other meals. Get plenty of regular exercise. Follow a consistent sleep schedule.

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Health Tip: Pack Safety Essentials for a Long Hike

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

-- If you're heading out on a trail or hike, make sure you're equipped with a few safety tools. The Washington Trails Association suggests taking these essentials: A detailed map of the area and a compass. Extra supplies of food and water, and a way to purify water. Extra clothing, sunscreen, sunglasses and rain gear. Matches and a firestarter. A flashlight and extra batteries. A well-stocked first-aid kit. A multi-purpose knife.

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Study Links Shift Work to Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

Posted 3 days ago in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, July 24, 2014 -- Shift workers, especially men, may be at higher risk for type 2 diabetes compared to people not on such schedules, a new study suggests. Also at special risk are shift workers who don't work on a set schedule, with shifts moving around at various times of the day. The findings are "not at all surprising," said one expert, Dr. Alan Manevitz, a clinical psychiatrist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. "Physicians have long known that working shifts disrupts many...

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Female Triathletes May Face Health Problems Such as Incontinence

Posted 3 days ago in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, July 24, 2014 -- Women who compete in triathlons are at increased risk for pelvic floor disorders, including incontinence, and other health problems, a new study says. "There has been a surge in popularity of high-impact sports such as triathlons, but little has been known until now about the prevalence of pelvic health and certain other issues associated with endurance training and events," study author Dr. Colleen Fitzgerald, a physiatrist at Loyola University Health System, said...

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Is Coffee Aggravating Your Hot Flashes?

Posted 3 days ago in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, July 24, 2014 -- Drinking caffeine may worsen the hot flashes and night sweats that affect roughly two-thirds of women as they go through menopause, new survey data suggests. "While these findings are preliminary, our study suggests that limiting caffeine intake may be useful for those postmenopausal women who have bothersome hot flashes and night sweats," said researcher Dr. Stephanie Faubion, director of the Women's Health Clinic at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. But caffeine...

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