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Vacation Weight Gain Can Lead to 'Creeping Obesity,' Study Finds

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

SUNDAY, Feb. 7, 2016 -- Along with souvenirs, there's a good chance you'll return from your vacation with some extra weight, new research suggests. The study looked at 122 American adults, aged 18 to 65, who went on vacations ranging from one to three weeks between March and August. Sixty-one percent gained weight while on vacation, with an average gain of 0.7 pounds, and that weight tended to stay on after they returned home. Some gained as much as 7 pounds, while others lost weight, the...

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Super Bowl Safety: Protect Kids From Toppling TVs

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

SATURDAY, Feb. 6, 2016 -- As families gather to watch the Super Bowl on Sunday, they should protect children from television tip-overs, experts say. More than 17,000 children are treated in U.S. emergency departments each year for injuries from a toppling TV, according to a study published in the journal Pediatrics. That works out to about one child every 30 minutes, with kids younger than 5 years at greatest risk, the researchers said. In most cases, the television fell from a dresser or...

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Surviving Spouse Still Influenced By the Other

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Feb. 5, 2016 -- The influence of a husband or wife on their spouse's quality of life remains strong even after death, a new study says. Couples who have been married a long time develop a high level of interdependence, and one partner's quality of life at death continues to influence the survivor, the University of Arizona researchers said. "If your partner has higher quality of life before they pass away, you're more likely to have higher quality of life even after they're gone. If...

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Record Heat, Drought May Explain Zika Outbreak in Brazil: Research

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Feb. 5, 2016 -- There may be a link between the recent hot and dry winter and spring in Brazil and the outbreak of the Zika virus, preliminary research suggests. "The extreme temperature and drought are due to a combination of the El Nino phenomenon and the climate changes of recent years," researcher Shlomit Paz, from the department of geography and environmental studies at the University of Haifa in Israel, said in a university news release. This week, the World Health Organization...

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Wildfires May Boost Ozone Levels in Cities: Study

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Feb. 5, 2016 -- Wildfire smoke may boost levels of dangerous ozone air pollution, researchers report. Colorado State University scientists analyzed data collected over nearly 10 years at hundreds of air monitoring sites across the United States. They found that ozone levels were higher on days when there was wildfire smoke in the air than on days without the smoke. This association was particularly evident in certain areas, including the Northeast corridor, Dallas, Houston, Atlanta,...

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Breast Cancer Survivors Vulnerable for Thyroid Tumors, and Vice Versa: Study

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Feb. 5, 2016 -- Women who survive breast or thyroid cancer are linked to an increased risk for the other, according to a new analysis. University of Chicago researchers who reviewed 37 published studies found breast cancer survivors were 1.55 times more likely to develop thyroid cancer than women who hadn't had breast cancer. And, female thyroid cancer survivors were 1.18 times more likely to get breast cancer than women who hadn't had thyroid cancer, researchers said. "This is a real...

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CDC: Black Americans With HIV Still Less Likely to Get Ongoing Medical Care

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Feb. 5, 2016 -- While HIV diagnoses dropped significantly over the past decade in the United States, blacks with HIV are less likely than whites or Hispanics to receive routine, ongoing care, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. From 2005 to 2014, annual HIV diagnoses fell 19 percent in the United States. Infections among black women dropped 42 percent during this period. Despite this progress in the fight against HIV, racial disparities persist, the CDC...

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Do More 'Selfies' Mean More Relationship Woes?

Posted 3 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Feb. 5, 2016 -- Posting too many "selfies" on social media might lead to serious problems with your romantic partner, according to a new study. Researchers conducted an online survey of 420 users of the social media site Instagram. The users were aged 18 to 62. The investigators found that those who believed they were good-looking were more likely to post selfies, which are photographic self-portraits. But the more selfies someone posted, the more likely the behavior was tied to...

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Texting After Dark May Harm Teens' Sleep, Grades

Posted 3 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Feb. 5, 2016 -- Instant messaging can be a source of emotional support for teens and help them collaborate on school projects, but new research shows that texting after the lights go out takes a toll on students' sleep quality and academic performance. "We need to be aware that teenagers are using electronic devices excessively and have a unique physiology," study author Xue Ming, a professor of neuroscience and neurology at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, said in a university news...

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Many Donor Livers for Sickest Patients Rejected, Study Finds

Posted 3 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Feb. 5, 2016 -- It's common for transplant centers to reject donor livers for the sickest patients on the transplant waiting list, a new study suggests. That means those patients have a higher risk of death while they wait for a lifesaving transplant, the researchers found. The new study reviewed 23,000 donor liver offers to 13,255 U.S. patients on the liver transplant waiting list between May 2007 and June 2013. It found that only 37 percent of the organ offers were accepted for the...

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Allergies, Asthma Tied to Lower Risk of Brain Cancer

Posted 3 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Feb. 5, 2016 -- People with respiratory allergies, asthma and the skin condition eczema may be less likely to develop glioma brain cancer, a new study suggests. The international team of researchers looked at more than 4,500 glioma patients and almost 4,200 people without brain cancer. The investigators found that a history of respiratory allergies, asthma and eczema was associated with a reduced risk for glioma. People with respiratory allergies or eczema were 30 percent less likely...

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CDC Adds New Zika Warning for Pregnant Women and Their Sex Partners

Posted 3 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Feb. 5, 2016 -- Pregnant women with a male sexual partner who has traveled to, or lives in, an area affected by active Zika virus transmission should refrain from sex or use condoms during sex until the pregnancy is over, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advised on Thursday. The CDC said the precaution is in place "until we know more" about the dangers of sexual transmission of the mosquito-borne virus, which is linked to thousands of cases of microcephaly in...

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NFL Linemen Keep Growing, Putting Their Health at Risk, Experts Say

Posted 3 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Feb. 5, 2016 -- As the Denver Broncos and Carolina Panthers gear up for Sunday's Super Bowl 50 showdown, many may be focused on the potential dangers of concussion, but that's not the only health risk football players face. Concern about the size of players -- especially linemen -- has been growing along with the players' waistlines. And some researchers are now suggesting that these athletes should be monitored for health problems. Physicians who work with overweight National...

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Super Bowl Foods Can Be a Win, Win: Healthy and Delicious

Posted 3 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Feb. 5, 2016 -- Super Bowl Sunday is as much about eating as it is about whether the Panthers or the Broncos score the first touchdown. Commonly served Super Bowl snacks, however, are often loaded with calories, fat and salt, cautioned Dana Angelo White, a clinical assistant professor of athletic training and sports medicine at Quinnipiac University in Hamden, Conn. But there are some easy ways to make game-day foods delicious and healthy, noted White. She offered the following...

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Waning Whooping Cough Immunity Blamed in Outbreaks

Posted 3 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, Feb. 5, 2016 -- The booster shot given to pre-teens to ward off whooping cough only works for a short time -- a fact that has played a big role in recent outbreaks in California, a new study finds. The study, of children in one large California health plan, found that the whooping cough booster shot offered "moderate" protection for about a year. But that immunity waned so quickly that little protection remained after two or three years. Experts said the findings, reported online Feb....

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Health Highlights: Feb. 5, 2016

Posted 3 days ago in Daily MedNews

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: Nearly 13 Million People Sign Up for Obamacare in 2016 About 12.7 million Americans are signed up for Obamacare in 2016, the White House says. That number includes people who signed up for individual private coverage or renewed their insurance for this year, Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell said Thursday. "It's not the unequivocal success that Obamacare advocates had hoped...

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Health Tip: Chickenpox Can Be Dangerous

Posted 3 days ago in Daily MedNews

-- Chickenpox is notoriously contagious, and for some people it can be very dangerous. Women who are pregnant, young children, the elderly and people with a weakened immune system are at greatest risk of complications. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention mentions these potential complications of chickenpox: Pneumonia, blood poisoning or dehydration. Brain inflammation or infection. Bacterial infection affecting the skin or soft tissues, especially among...

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Racial Disparity in Kidney Transplant Outcomes Narrows: Study

Posted 3 days ago in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, Feb. 4, 2016 -- Racial disparities in kidney transplant outcomes are shrinking, new research indicates. Previous studies had shown that black patients who received kidney transplants had worse outcomes compared with white patients. But a new analysis of roughly 200,000 kidney transplants revealed that the success of surgeries involving black people improved between 1990 and 2012, with fewer organ rejections and deaths among these patients. The study authors compared information on...

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Depression May Boost Seniors' Risk for Heart Disease, Stroke

Posted 3 days ago in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, Feb. 4, 2016 -- Depression increases the risk of heart disease and stroke in older adults, a new study indicates. The researchers looked at more than 7,300 seniors in France with no history of heart disease, stroke or dementia at the start of the study period. Participants were assessed again two, four and seven years later. Initially, about 30 percent of the women and 15 percent of the men had high levels of depression symptoms. At each follow-up visit, about 40 percent of those...

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Daily Bit of Chocolate in Pregnancy May Help Mom, Baby

Posted 3 days ago in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, Feb. 4, 2016 -- Pregnant women who nibble just a small piece of chocolate each day may improve the circulatory health of their unborn child, a new study suggests. The tiny treat may also reduce the risk for preeclampsia, a potentially deadly condition in which a pregnant woman with normal blood pressure suddenly develops dangerously high blood pressure, the researchers said. The findings held up regardless of whether the chocolate consumed contained high or low amounts of so-called...

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