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Vets With PTSD Might Need Sleep Apnea Screening: Study

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FRIDAY, May 29, 2015 -- For U.S. veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the risk of sleep apnea increases along with the severity of the mental health condition, a new study contends. Sleep apnea -- a common sleep disorder in which breathing frequently stops and starts -- is potentially serious. Researchers looked at 195 Iraq and Afghanistan veterans who visited a Veterans Affairs outpatient PTSD clinic for evaluation. About 69 percent were at high risk for obstructive sleep...

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FDA Warns of Complications From Facial Fillers

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FRIDAY, May 29, 2015 -- Soft tissue fillers used in cosmetic procedures can accidentally be injected into blood vessels in the face and cause serious harm, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns. The fillers are approved to treat wrinkles or to enhance cheeks or lips. Injection of facial fillers into blood vessels can cause blockages that restrict blood supply to tissues. Filler material injected into blood vessels can also travel to other areas and cause stroke, vision problems, blindness...

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150 People May Have Had Contact With Lassa Fever Victim: CDC

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FRIDAY, May 29, 2015 -- At least 150 people may have had contact with a New Jersey man who died Monday in that state of Lassa fever, but most of them aren't at serious risk of infection, U.S. health officials reported Thursday. The unidentified 55-year-old man had returned to the United States on May 17 after traveling to Liberia in West Africa. Lassa fever is a viral disease that's common in West Africa but rarely seen in the United States. It is nowhere near as infectious as the Ebola virus,...

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Millennials Turning Their Backs on Religion

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FRIDAY, May 29, 2015 -- Millennials -- those born in the 1980s and 1990s -- are the least religious generation of Americans in the last six decades, a new study says. For the study, researchers analyzed data from 11.2 million participants in four national surveys of U.S. teens, aged 13 to 18, conducted between 1966 and 2014. The investigators found that millennials are less likely to say religion is important to them, less approving of religious organizations, less spiritual and spend less time...

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Rapamune Approved for Rare Lung Disease

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FRIDAY, May 29, 2015 -- Rapamune (sirolimus) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat a rare, progressive lung disease that mostly affects women of childbearing age. Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is characterized by the unusual growth of smooth-muscle cells among lung tissue. This can block normal airflow in the lungs and hinder delivery of oxygen to the rest of the body. The very rare disease affects only two to five women per million women globally, the FDA said in...

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Health Highlights: May 29, 2015

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Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: Boston Scientific Ordered to Pay $100 Million in Transvaginal Mesh Insert Case Medical device maker Boston Scientific has been ordered to pay $100 million to a woman who suffered major complications after having the company's transvaginal mesh inserts implanted in 2009. The inserts are used to treat sagging pelvic organs and incontinence in women. The woman's complications included urinary...

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Excess Weight Linked to Worse Prostate Cancer Prognosis

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FRIDAY, May 29, 2015 -- Radiation therapy for prostate cancer may be less effective for overweight and obese men than for men of normal weight, a new study suggests. Higher rates of prostate cancer relapse, prostate cancer death, and death from other causes were seen for overweight and obese men in this study of more than 1,400 prostate cancer patients. "It isn't the weight per se, but there must be some association with increased weight that's making the treatment less effective," said lead...

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Inmates Denied Methadone Less Likely to Choose Treatment When Released

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FRIDAY, May 29, 2015 -- Drug addicts forced off methadone maintenance treatment while in prison are much less likely to seek such treatment when they're released than inmates who keep receiving the treatment, a new study finds. Taking inmates off methadone maintenance treatment is widespread policy in U.S. prisons, though the treatment saves lives, reduces drug-seeking behaviors and helps reduce the spread of HIV and hepatitis, according to the researchers. Their study included more than 200...

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Health Tip: Don't Use Food as a Reward

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-- Food shouldn't be used as a reward to encourage good behavior in children, experts say. Children should learn that food is to fuel the body, not an indulgence. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics mentions these alternatives: Having a play date with friends. Getting a treat, such as a set of stickers. Having a special visit with grandparents, or a day to skip chores. Making a trip to a favorite place, such as the zoo, park, movies, bowling alley, pool or skating rink. Getting a special...

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Health Tip: Protect Your Eyes From Corneal Abrasion

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-- A corneal abrasion is the medical term for a scratch on the eye's cornea. The American Academy of Family Physicians says there are steps you can take to protect your eyes from this injury: Wear a pair of protective goggles any time you are near machinery that could send particles into the air. Trim your fingernails short. Keep low-hanging tree branches trimmed. Take care when cleaning, installing and removing contact lenses.

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Oil and Gas Industry Worker Death Rate Down by a Third

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THURSDAY, May 28, 2015 -- Even as the oil and gas extraction industry in the United States boomed, there was a decline in the rate of worker deaths, a new federal government study shows. From 2003 to 2013, the oil and gas extraction industry workforce more than doubled and the number of drilling rigs increased 71 percent, the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Health and Safety said. During that time, the number of oil and gas extraction industry worker deaths rose, but there was a 36...

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Older Hispanic Men at Risk of Hearing Loss, Study Finds

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THURSDAY, May 28, 2015 -- A survey of Hispanic Americans finds older men are at especially high risk of losing their hearing. A team led by Karen Cruickshanks of the University of Wisconsin, Madison, tracked data from a survey of more than 16,400 Hispanics, aged 18 to 74, in New York, Chicago, Miami and San Diego. The investigators found that 15 percent had hearing impairment and more than 8 percent had hearing loss in both ears. In general, men and adults aged 45 and older had higher rates...

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Diabetes Drug Metformin May Lower Glaucoma Risk

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THURSDAY, May 28, 2015 -- The diabetes drug metformin was linked to a lower risk of developing the eye condition glaucoma in a new study. People who took the most metformin during the 10-year study period had a 25 percent reduced risk of glaucoma compared with people not taking the drug, researchers found. "Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness worldwide and classic open-angle glaucoma develops in late middle age or late age. So we hypothesized that a drug that mimics caloric restriction,...

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Organ Donor Rates Vary Widely Across America, Study Finds

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THURSDAY, May 28, 2015 -- In the United States, organ donor rates are highest in the Midwest and lowest in New York state, a new study finds. "With over 10,000 patients a year dying on a transplant waiting list or becoming too sick to undergo a transplant, these data highlight the potential opportunity to save hundreds of more lives each year by increasing consent rates among potential organ donors," said senior study author Dr. Richard Gilroy, medical director of liver transplantation at the...

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Marriage Before College Graduation Tied to More Weight Gain

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THURSDAY, May 28, 2015 -- If you got married before finishing college, you might have an excuse for any extra pounds. A new study suggests that young adults who wed before graduation are about 50 percent more likely to later become obese than those who waited to tie the knot. The findings suggest that lifestyle choices by newlyweds early in life can be long-lasting, said study lead author Richard Miech, a research professor at the University of Michigan. "Newlyweds may change their diet...

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Murder Most Foul, 430,000 Years Ago

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THURSDAY, May 28, 2015 -- A 430,000-year-old skull discovered in Spain has deadly wounds that suggest one of the first known cases of murder in human history. The skull was discovered at an archeological site called Sima de los Huesos in northern Spain. The site -- deep within an underground cave system -- contains the skeletal remains of at least 28 people from a period of time known as the Middle Pleistocene. The only access to the site is down a 42-foot vertical shaft. Discovered among...

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Teen Drivers a Danger to Others on the Road, Report Warns

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THURSDAY, May 28, 2015 -- Teen drivers are a threat to everyone on the road, a new study warns. Sixty-seven percent of people injured and 66 percent of those killed in crashes involving teen drivers are people other than the teen driver, according to the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. That's a large number of people. On U.S. roads in 2013, more than 371,000 people were injured and almost 3,000 were killed in crashes involving teen drivers. "Teen crash rates are higher than any other age...

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Two Drugs Approved for Irritable Bowel

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THURSDAY, May 28, 2015 -- Two new therapies to treat irritable bowel syndrome accompanied by diarrhea (IBS-D) in adults have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. IBS, characterized by loose stools and abdominal discomfort, affects 10 percent to 15 percent of U.S. adults, the FDA said in a news release. The first drug, Viberzi, is taken twice daily with food. It stimulates nervous system receptors that can reduce bowel contractions. Common side effects include constipation,...

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Women, Poor, Uninsured Face Higher Risk of Psychological Distress: CDC

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THURSDAY, May 28, 2015 -- Women, people with chronic medical conditions, the poor and those without health insurance are more likely to struggle with "serious psychological distress," U.S. health officials reported Thursday. Serious psychological distress is a term that identifies people who are likely to be diagnosed with a mental disorder that limits their lives, according to the researchers. Overall, they found that about 3 percent of Americans surveyed have serious psychological...

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Average New Yorker Sits 7 Hours Each Day: Study

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THURSDAY, May 28, 2015 -- They may live in the "City That Never Sleeps," but most New Yorkers still sit around a lot -- an average of seven hours every day, a new study shows. That estimate may be low, the study authors added, because the data was largely based on what people remembered or admitted to doing. One local health expert expressed concern. "With simply sitting more than three hours a day, there is a decrease [in] life expectancy," said Dr. Suzanne Steinbaum, director of Women's...

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