Medication Guide App

Daily MedNews

Get news by email or subscribe to our news feeds.

FDA Should Stop Sales of Essure Contraceptive Implant: Petition

Posted today in Daily MedNews

Bayer's contraceptive implant Essure can cause serious complications and should be taken off the market, says a citizen's petition filed with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The FDA approved Essure about 13 years ago after a review process that was fast-tracked because the device was the first alternative to surgical sterilization for women who did not want more children and offered patients a quick recovery, The New York Times reported. Essure is a metal and polyester coil implanted...

Read more...

Fecal Transplant Helps Fight Off Dangerous Gut Infection: Review

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, May 4, 2015 -- Though saddled with an undeniable "yuck factor," fecal transplantation appears to be a safe and effective way to combat a serious intestinal infection, according to a new review. Fecal transplantation, also known as fecal bacteriotherapy, is a procedure that involves the removal of stool from a healthy donor and infusion of that stool -- and all the healthy bacteria it contains -- into the microbial environment of the sick patient. Specifically, the review found that...

Read more...

Diabetes Study Suggests a Little Extra Weight Tied to Longer Survival

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, May 4, 2015 -- A controversial new study suggests that some extra weight may be linked to a longer life for people with type 2 diabetes. Compared to underweight or normal-weight people with type 2 diabetes, those who were overweight but not obese were less likely to die over the 10-year study period, British researchers found. But this isn't to say that folks with type 2 diabetes can safely fatten up, researchers said. The study only showed an association between extra weight and...

Read more...

Expert Panel Unclear on Whether E-Cigarettes Help Smokers Quit

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, May 4, 2015 -- An influential U.S. panel of experts says there's just not enough data to decide whether or not e-cigarettes can help smokers quit. For now, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends behavioral therapy and federally approved medications, such as nicotine replacement treatments, for most adults seeing to kick the smoking habit. The exception: pregnant women. For them, the task force recommends behavioral therapy alone. In any case, doctors "should ask...

Read more...

Bystander CPR Linked to Better Outcomes After Cardiac Arrest

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, May 4, 2015 -- New research from Denmark finds that more cardiac arrest survivors are returning to work, because more bystanders are performing CPR. "We already know CPR helps save lives -- and now our findings suggest there is even more benefit in performing it," study author Dr. Kristian Kragholm, a clinical assistant at Aalborg University Hospital and Aarhus University in Aalborg, said in an American Heart Association (AHA) news release. He is also a fellow at the Duke Clinical...

Read more...

Obesity Tied to Risk of Complications After Plastic Surgery

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, May 4, 2015 -- Obese people who choose to have plastic surgery are 35 percent more likely than normal-weight people to have to visit the emergency room or be admitted to the hospital within 30 days after their operation, new research suggests. The findings highlight the importance of telling obese patients about the risks involved with such surgical procedures, the study authors said. "It is important to educate overweight and obese patients regarding their risk of complications"...

Read more...

Device May Pose Dangers for Patients With Irregular Heartbeat: Study

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, May 4, 2015 -- Heart surgeons are making regular and potentially dangerous "off-label" use of a suturing device in patients with abnormal heart rhythms, researchers report. Though the Lariat device can be used to tie off a part of the heart that raises stroke risk, it has not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for this specific purpose. And a small number of atrial fibrillation patients have needed lifesaving surgery or died following this off-label procedure, the...

Read more...

E-Health Records May Not Boost Stroke Care

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, May 4, 2015 -- While electronic health records are touted as the holy grail of a transparent health care system, a new study finds they don't improve treatment results for some stroke patients in the United States. Patients fared about the same in terms of quality of care and illness progression whether their hospitals had embraced electronic health records or not, researchers report May 4 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The records "do not appear to be...

Read more...

Many Young Football Players Get Concussions at Practice, Study Says

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, May 4, 2015 -- Most concussions among high school and college football players occur during practice, a new study finds. Data on more than 20,000 young football players across the United States revealed that more than 57 percent of concussed high school and college players were injured at practice, not games. Among youth football players, almost half of concussions were sustained during practice, according to the study published online May 4 in the journal JAMA Pediatrics. Evaluating...

Read more...

Sleepwalking Parents Likely to Have Sleepwalking Kids

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, May 4, 2015 -- More than 60 percent of children with two sleepwalking parents go on to develop the condition themselves, new research shows. "These findings point to a strong genetic influence on sleepwalking and, to a lesser degree, sleep terrors," the Canadian study authors wrote. "Parents who have been sleepwalkers in the past, particularly in cases where both parents have been sleepwalkers, can expect their children to sleepwalk and thus should prepare adequately." Sleepwalking...

Read more...

ER Doctors Cautious When Prescribing Narcotic Painkillers: Study

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, May 4, 2015 -- U.S. emergency room doctors are cautious when prescribing narcotic painkillers that carry a high risk of abuse, a new study shows. Researchers analyzed data collected from more than 27,000 patients seen at 19 emergency departments (EDs) across the United States during a single week in October 2012. Nearly 12 percent of the patients were prescribed narcotic painkillers. Narcotic painkillers include drugs such as Oxycontin (oxycodone) and Vicodin (hydrocodone). The...

Read more...

Too Many Americans Neglect Backs in Skin Cancer Prevention

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, May 4, 2015 -- A new survey finds that many people in the United States are forgetting their backs when they try to be forward-thinking about skin cancer prevention. Experts at the American Academy of Dermatology, which sponsored the survey, note that the back is a common site for melanoma, a potentially deadly skin cancer. However, of the more than 1,000 Americans polled, over a third said they rarely or never apply sunscreen to their backs when they're in the sun. Almost half (43...

Read more...

Health Highlights: May 4, 2015

Posted today in Daily MedNews

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: FDA Should Stop Sales of Essure Contraceptive Implant: Petition Bayer's contraceptive implant Essure can cause serious complications and should be taken off the market, says a citizen's petition filed with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The FDA approved Essure about 13 years ago after a review process that was fast-tracked because the device was the first alternative to surgical...

Read more...

Preteen Whooping Cough Vaccine Loses Strength Over Time, CDC Finds

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, May 4, 2015 -- A booster shot of the whooping cough vaccine that is given to preteens loses a large measure of effectiveness within a few years, new research reveals. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention investigation may help explain a recent surge in the number of Americans with whooping cough (pertussis). "Among adolescents, within the first year following immunization the vaccine effectiveness was 73 percent," said study author Dr. Anna Acosta, an epidemiologist in...

Read more...

Health Tip: Build a Healthy Self-Image

Posted today in Daily MedNews

-- It may be difficult to be happy with what you see in the mirror, but a healthy self-image will help you care for yourself. The Cleveland Clinic recommends: Jot down a list of positive qualities you see in yourself. Ask loved ones to share what they think are your positive qualities. Create goals that are attainable and that you can easily measure. Work on improving your strongest qualities. Consider and address any distorted thoughts you have about yourself. Think about how any labels...

Read more...

Health Tip: Understanding Eye Injuries in Kids

Posted today in Daily MedNews

-- Parents should know what to do if something gets in their child's eyes or if the child suffers an eye injury. The American Academy of Ophthalmology offers these suggestions: Never put pressure on, rub or touch an injured eye. If there is debris in a child's eye, raise the eyelid and have the child blink quickly. If that doesn't remove the object, seek immediate treatment. Never attempt to remove anything from a person's eye. Don't use an ointment in the eye. Carefully cover any puncture...

Read more...

Gene Therapy Shows Promise for Inherited Eye Disease

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

SUNDAY, May 3, 2015 -- A new study finds that gene therapy quickly improves eyesight for patients who've lost their vision from an inherited condition called Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). But the improvements aren't permanent: Researchers said the gains began to diminish after one to three years. "Gene therapy for LCA demonstrated we could improve vision in previously untreatable and incurable retinal conditions," study leader Dr. Samuel Jacobson, of the University of Pennsylvania's...

Read more...

Be a Responsible Camper

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

SUNDAY, May 3, 2015 -- When you camp out, take steps to reduce your impact on the environment, experts advise. The nonprofit group Tread Lightly recommends using existing campsites whenever possible and camping on durable surfaces. Other ways to minimize your "footprint" include placing tents on non-vegetated areas, not digging trenches around tents, and camping at least 200 feet from water, trails and other campsites. Pack out what you pack in, the organization advises in a news release. It's...

Read more...

Mow With Safety in Mind

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

SATURDAY, May 2, 2015 -- Before you get ready to cut your grass, remember lawn mowers can pose a significant injury risk, experts say. In 2010, more than 250,000 people in the United States were treated for lawn mower-related injuries, a 3 percent increase from 2009, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. And children younger than 19 accounted for 17,000 of the lawn mower-related injuries in 2010. There are a number of ways to reduce the risk of such injuries, the American...

Read more...

Can Statins Help Lower Lung Cancer Death Risk?

Posted 3 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, May 1, 2015 -- Taking the cholesterol-lowering medications known as statins for a year before getting a diagnosis of lung cancer was associated with a 12 percent lower risk of dying from that cancer, new research suggests. The researchers from Northern Ireland also found indications that those who had a minimum of 12 statin prescriptions filled after being diagnosed with lung cancer saw their lung cancer death risk drop by as much as 19 percent. But, study lead author Chris Cardwell...

Read more...
Older articles
Hide
(web2)