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Health Tip: Focus on the Positive

Posted today in Daily MedNews

-- Dwelling on your problems and getting stuck on negative emotions can worsen depression and anxiety. The American Psychological Association offers these suggestions: Pray or meditate to block out negative thoughts. When negative emotions arise, think about eliminating their causes in a more positive way. If your goals aren't realistic, set more attainable goals. Find new ways to boost your self-esteem.

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Health Tip: Selecting a Sleep Mask

Posted today in Daily MedNews

-- Bright light can interrupt sleep quickly, so many people use a sleep mask. The National Sleep Foundation suggests how to choose the right one: Consider whether you need a sleep mask that provides total blackout, or one that provides darker conditions in a room that's already fairly dark. Look for a mask that fits across the bridge of the nose. Invest in a quality mask with a nose flap to help block more light and provide a better fit. Opt for a mask with cavities that alleviate pressure...

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Expectant Mom's Flu Shot Protects 2

Posted today in Daily MedNews

TUESDAY, May 3, 2016 -- When a pregnant woman gets vaccinated for the flu, the protection extends to her baby too, new research confirms. Babies 6 months and younger whose mothers had a flu vaccine during pregnancy were 70 percent less likely to have lab-confirmed flu than babies born to mothers who didn't have the immunization while pregnant. In addition, the babies born to mothers immunized during pregnancy had an 80 percent reduction in flu-related hospitalizations, the study...

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Study Ties Implanted Defibrillators to Long-Term Complications

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, May 2, 2016 -- Implantable defibrillators -- devices that detect and correct an abnormal heart rhythm -- are associated with a high risk of long-term complications, a new study suggests. "An [implantable cardioverter-defibrillator] is a highly effective treatment option to reduce the risk of sudden cardiac death," said lead researcher Dr. Isuru Ranasinghe, a senior cardiologist at the University of Adelaide in South Australia. "However, there is a substantial and persistent risk of...

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Desperate for Shut-Eye?

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, May 2, 2016 -- People with long-term sleep troubles should turn to a form of psychotherapy to reboot normal sleeping patterns before trying sleeping pills, the American College of Physicians recommends. Specifically, people with chronic insomnia should try cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), the experts said. This treatment combines talk therapy, behavioral interventions and education. If CBT doesn't work, patients and their doctors should then decide together whether to add drug...

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Well Water a Suspected Cause of Bladder Cancer in New England

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, May 2, 2016 -- Arsenic in drinking water from private wells may explain the elevated bladder cancer risk among people in three New England states, a new study suggests. Bladder cancer rates in Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont have been about 20 percent higher than the national rate for more than 50 years, the researchers noted. They said this difference was not explained by factors such as smoking or job exposures. "Arsenic is an established cause of bladder cancer, largely based on...

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Nuplazid Approved for Parkinson's Hallucinations

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, May 2, 2016 -- Nuplazid (pimavanserin) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat hallucinations and delusions associated with Parkinson's disease. As many as half of people with Parkinson's may have psychosis that lead to hallucinations and delusions, the agency said in a news release announcing the approval. This can lead to behaviors including difficulty associating with loved ones or the inability to take care of oneself. Some 50,000 Americans are...

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High School Football Players Suffer More Symptoms After Concussion: Study

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, May 2, 2016 -- High school football players are more likely to suffer more symptoms after a concussion, and to need more recovery time than their college counterparts, a new study finds. But those who play in youth football leagues are the most likely to get back on the field less than 24 hours after a concussion, the researchers discovered. "The finding related to return-to-play under 24 hours being the highest in the youth level is surprising, but may be the result of young football...

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Does TV Influence Which Alcohol Teens Favor?

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, May 2, 2016 -- The more teens see alcohol brands on TV shows, the greater the chances they'll choose those brands, a new study finds. Researchers looked at alcohol product placement on 10 popular TV shows. They found an average of two placements per episode. Some shows had more than 13 alcohol brand placements per episode, the study noted. "Given the significant health implications of underage drinking, the Federal Trade Commission needs to place more emphasis on monitoring and...

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Even in Taxis, Kids Belong in Safety Seats

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, May 2, 2016 -- Small children riding in taxis often aren't in a car safety seat, putting them at risk for injury and death in an accident, U.S. researchers warn. All 50 states require young children to be in car safety seats when traveling in a motor vehicle. But, many municipalities exempt taxis from this safety rule, the researchers said. Study senior investigator Dr. Ruth Milanaik is with Cohen Children's Medical Center in New Hyde Park, N.Y. "Given that car safety seats have been...

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Even Non-Obese Report Better Mood, Sex Drive After Dieting

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, May 2, 2016 -- Dieting might help improve your health, mood, sex drive and stress levels even if you're not obese, a new clinical trial reports. A group of either healthy weight or mildly overweight people who followed a calorie-restricted diet for two years lost nearly 17 pounds on average and enjoyed significant quality-of-life improvement, said lead author Corby Martin. He is director for behavioral sciences and epidemiology with the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton...

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Could Talk Therapy Ease Chemo-Related Memory Issues?

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, May 2, 2016 -- A type of psychotherapy might help cancer survivors deal with the long-term thinking problems some experience after chemotherapy, researchers say. It's estimated that about half of those who undergo chemotherapy for cancer develop what's often called "chemo brain." For instance, they may have trouble following conversations or remembering the steps in a project, according to background notes with the new study. Although usually mild, these changes can affect quality of...

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Health Highlights: May 2, 2016

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: Huge Price Increases for Oral Cancer Drugs Since 2000: Study Prices of oral cancer drugs in the United States have risen sharply since 2000, a new study finds. The average cost of a new oral cancer drug introduced in 2000 was about $1,869 a month, compared with $11,325 a month for one approved in 2014, about six times higher, United Press International reported. Gleevec had one of the largest...

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More Kids Burned, Hospitalized as Fireworks Sales Rules Ease

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, May 2, 2016 -- There has been a sharp increase in the number of U.S. children who have been hospitalized with fireworks-related burns since sales restrictions on fireworks have been eased, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed national data and found a slight increase since 2006 in the number of patients younger than 21 with fireworks-related burn injuries who were treated and released by U.S. emergency departments. But the investigators found a much larger increase in the...

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Obamacare Buyers Could Have Fewer Choices in 2017

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, May 2, 2016 -- With the nation's largest health insurer exiting all but a few Affordable Care Act exchanges next year, some Americans may be left with fewer choices and some might see higher monthly premiums. Experts say that will be the upshot of UnitedHealth Group Inc.'s recent announcement that it will pull out of most of the 34 states where it offers health plans on the public health insurance exchanges. The public health insurance exchanges are online marketplaces where people can...

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Health Tip: Donating Blood

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

-- Typically, you must be at least 17 years old and meet a few health criteria to donate blood. If you're able, it's a great way to help save lives. The American Red Cross offers this advice on what to expect: One blood donation can help save the lives of three other people. The donation procedure is safe and easy. While the donation itself only takes about 10 minutes, expect to be at the donation center for about an hour. Prepare for donation by making sure you're well-hydrated. Eat a...

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Playground-Related Brain Injuries on Rise in U.S.

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, May 2, 2016 (Healthday News) -- For some kids, playgrounds aren't all fun and games. Playground-related brain injuries have risen significantly in the United States over the last decade, health officials say. Despite improvements in playground safety and design, between 2001 and 2013, emergency rooms treated an average of 21,000 playground-related traumatic brain injuries annually among kids 14 and younger. The statistics were compiled for a new report from the U.S. Centers for...

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Health Tip: Planning Makes Healthy Eating Simpler

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

-- Making healthy food choices requires some planning to avoid spontaneous choices -- which may not be so healthy. The American Heart Association suggests: Create a plan of two-to-four weeks' worth of healthy meals for your family. Include your family's favorite healthier meals, adding new recipes to the rotation as you come across them. Plan your week's menus on the weekends, using the long-term list. Bring the menu with you when you shop. If work weeks are too busy, cook most of your...

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More U.S. Kids Have Chronic Health Problems: Study

Posted 3 days ago in Daily MedNews

SATURDAY, April 30, 2016 -- The number of American kids suffering from asthma and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is on the increase, with poor children being hit the hardest, researchers report. Children living in extreme poverty who had asthma and ADHD were nearly twice as likely to have at least one other chronic medical condition. These conditions included developmental delays, autism, depression, anxiety, behavioral or conduct issues, speech and language problems, epilepsy...

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Study Suggests Aerial Pesticide Spraying Tied to Higher Autism Rates

Posted 3 days ago in Daily MedNews

SATURDAY, April 30, 2016 -- Children living in an area of New York state that uses aerial pesticides to control mosquitoes have a higher rate of autism than children in neighboring areas, a new study finds. Researchers found that children living in a swampy region in central New York were 25 percent more likely to have been diagnosed with autism or general developmental delay, compared to children in other parts of the state. However, the findings do not prove that aerial pesticides raise the...

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