Skip to Content

Daily MedNews

Knee Replacement Patients May Be Able to Hit the Shower Sooner

Posted today in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 -- Knee surgery patients are usually instructed to wait two weeks after surgery to take a shower to reduce the risk of infection. But a small new study suggests this may not be necessary. Researchers found no differences in bacterial swabs from those who waited two weeks to shower compared with those allowed to shower after about two days. That's no doubt welcome news to the many patients who've struggled to find a way to bathe without getting their incision wet. The...

Read more

Probuphine Implant Approved for Opioid Dependence

Posted today in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the first-ever buprenorphine implant to treat opioid dependence, the agency said Thursday in a news release. Up to now, the drug buprenorphine has only been available in pill or film form to be placed under a person's tongue, the FDA said. Probuphine, which provides a constant, low-level dose of the drug, is designed to last six months. Earlier this year, an FDA advisory committee of experts recommended Probuphine's...

Read more

FDA Approves Implant to Battle Opioid Addiction

Posted today in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 -- A new long-acting implant that can help treat people addicted to heroin and prescription painkillers was approved Thursday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. "Opioid abuse and addiction have taken a devastating toll on American families. We must do everything we can to make new, innovative treatment options available that can help patients regain control over their lives," FDA Commissioner Dr. Robert M. Califf said in a statement. "Today's approval provides the...

Read more

Breast Milk Best From the Breast?

Posted today in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 -- Infants fed directly from the breast are less likely to develop ear infections than those who are fed pumped breast milk from a bottle, a new study suggests. The study also found that infants who receive breast milk by either method have a lower risk of diarrhea. Researchers studied nearly 500 new mothers and their infants and found that one month of feeding at the breast was associated with a 4 percent lower risk of ear infections. Doing so for six months was...

Read more

Fewer U.S. Kids Die From Abusive Head Trauma: CDC

Posted today in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 -- Half as many babies and preschoolers in the United States are dying from abusive head trauma as in 2009, federal health officials reported Thursday. Deaths of children under age 5 from this form of violence dropped an average 13 percent annually between 2009 and 2014, with the biggest falloff in the last two years of the study, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Experts said the statistics reflect good news -- for the most part. "I am...

Read more

Fastballs a Fast Track to 'Tommy John Surgery'?

Posted today in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 -- A new study finds that throwing a lot of fastballs may increase a pitcher's risk of an elbow injury requiring "Tommy John surgery." "Our findings suggest that throwing a high percentage of fastballs rather than off-speed pitches puts more stress on the elbow," said study author Dr. Robert Keller. "This leads to elbow fatigue, overuse and, subsequently, injury," Keller, chief resident in the department of orthopedic surgery at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, said in a...

Read more

Tough Economy, Alcohol Fuels Suicide Risk in Men: Study

Posted today in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 -- Heavy drinking may fuel the risk of suicide among men when the economy is sinking, new research suggests. Previous studies found a link between increased suicide risk among Americans and economic downturns. So, investigators from the University of California, Los Angeles decided to examine the role alcohol plays in that association. In general, recessions are linked with an overall decline in drinking, but heavy drinking increases, particularly among people affected...

Read more

Lifestyle Change May Cut Risk for Women With Breast Cancer Genes

Posted today in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 -- Women who carry common gene variants linked to breast cancer can still cut their risk of the disease by following a healthy lifestyle, a large new study suggests. In fact, lifestyle might be especially powerful for women at relatively high genetic risk of breast cancer, researchers found. "Those genetic risks are not set in stone," said senior researcher Nilanjan Chatterjee, a professor at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore. The study found...

Read more

Message for Heart Failure Patients: Exercise

Posted today in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 -- Physical activity may help extend survival for patients with heart failure, a new review suggests. "Patients with heart failure should not be scared of exercise damaging them or killing them," said principal investigator Rod Taylor, director of the Exeter Clinical Trials Unit at the University of Exeter Medical School, in England. "The message for heart failure patients is clear. Exercise is good for you, it will make you feel better, and it could potentially make...

Read more

Global Recession May Have Contributed to Cancer Deaths

Posted today in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 -- The 2008 global economic crisis has been linked to a sharp rise in deaths from cancer, a new study reports. Unemployment and cuts in public health-care spending were associated with more than 260,000 additional cancer deaths by 2010. Most of those deaths -- 160,000 -- were in the European Union, the researchers said. The study included 70 countries and a total of more than 2 billion people, according to the report published online May 25 in The Lancet. "Cancer is a...

Read more

1.2 Million U.S. College Students Boozing on Average Day

Posted today in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 -- When they're not hitting the books, many U.S. college students are hitting the bars or getting high, a new government report shows. About 1.2 million full-time college students, aged 18 to 22, drink alcohol, and nearly 704,000 use marijuana on an average day, researchers from the U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) found. "Substance misuse at any age can jeopardize one's health and long-term well-being, but college students may be...

Read more

Some Experts Question Extent of Zika Threat to U.S.

Posted today in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 -- Are health officials in the United States overreacting to the threat posed by the Zika virus this summer? Some leading insect and infectious-diseases experts think so, arguing that the mosquito-borne virus is unlikely to become a widespread hazard to pregnant women throughout the United States. "I think the risk for Zika actually setting up transmission cycles that become established in the continental U.S. is near zero," said Chris Barker, a mosquito-borne virus...

Read more

Health Highlights: May 26, 2016

Posted today in Daily MedNews

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: New South Carolina Law Bans Abortions At 20 Weeks A bill outlawing most abortions at 20 weeks after conception was signed Wednesday by South Carolina Republican Gov. Nikki Haley and takes effect July 1. The only exceptions to the law are if a mother's life is at risk or if a doctor concludes the fetus can't survive outside the womb, the Associated Press reported. For each violation of the...

Read more

Health Tip: Enjoy a Healthier Mexican Meal

Posted today in Daily MedNews

-- A delicious Mexican meal doesn't have to be high in fat, calories or salt. Try these healthier ideas from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Include in your meal avocados, peppers, tomatoes, mangoes or jicama. Dip into fresh salsa, and make a dessert with a berry or other fruit base. Skip the sour cream, cheese and other high-fat fare, in favor of tortillas filled with veggies, chicken and beans. Look for dishes that are grilled, broiled, baked or stir-fried. Don't be afraid to...

Read more

Health Tip: Protect Your Hands While Gardening

Posted today in Daily MedNews

-- Digging and weeding can pose dangers for your hands, so use caution while working in your garden. The American Society for Surgery of the Hand suggests these precautions: Wear a pair of leather gloves to protect hands from bites, scratches, blisters, poison ivy, chemicals, fertilizers, bacteria and sunburn. Perform a different task every 15 minutes to avoid repetitive use of the same muscles. Such tasks include: raking, digging, planting, trimming or pruning. Use a small hand shovel to...

Read more

Genetic Insights May Help Kids Battling Developmental Delays

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, May 25, 2016 -- There's new hope for children stricken by mysterious developmental delays, with a new study showing that extensive genetic analysis may help determine the cause of their disability. Canadian researchers found a precise genetic cause for seven out of every 10 children suffering from a previously undiagnosed condition that caused developmental delays. In many cases, the genetic analysis led to groundbreaking discoveries. Researchers discovered 11 new disease genes...

Read more

2 New Findings Offer Hope for Those With Severe Hemophilia

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, May 25, 2016 -- Two new studies could pave the way to major changes in how doctors treat severe cases of hemophilia -- a rare genetic disorder that can cause uncontrolled bleeding. Both studies tackle a key challenge: Up to one-third of children with severe hemophilia develop antibodies against the standard therapy. But one study highlights the value of an old therapy, while the other shows promising early results with an experimental drug. Experts said both should stir discussion...

Read more

Researchers Find 8 Immune Genes in Aggressive Brain Cancer

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, May 25, 2016 -- Researchers have identified immune genes that may affect how long people live after diagnosis with a common type of brain cancer. If confirmed in other studies, the researchers say their findings could lead to improved treatment in the future. The type of brain cancer in the study is glioblastoma multiforme, a fast-growing tumor. People with this type of cancer survive an average of less than two years, even after treatment with surgery, radiation and chemotherapy,...

Read more

Smoking Harms Black Americans' Kidneys, Study Suggests

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, May 25, 2016 -- Smoking may pose a significant risk to kidney health for black Americans, new research suggests. The study included more than 3,600 black adults, aged 21 to 84, from Jackson, Miss., and the surrounding area. The researchers followed their health for 12 years. During that time, the researchers found that, overall, study participants who were current smokers had an 83 percent greater decline in kidney function than those who never smoked. The more a person smoked,...

Read more

Hepatitis C Patients More Likely to Drink, Study Finds

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, May 25, 2016 -- People infected with hepatitis C are more likely to be current or former heavy drinkers, a new study suggests. Unfortunately, alcohol may accelerate the liver damage associated with the virus, the researchers added. Adults with hepatitis C were three times more likely to have five or more drinks daily -- currently or in the past -- than people who didn't have the virus, according to the study published recently in the American Journal of Preventive...

Read more
Older articles
Hide