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Daily MedNews

Childhood Trauma Tied to Migraine Risk as Adult

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, July 3, 2015 -- Experiencing a traumatic event during childhood may raise the risk for migraines as an adult, new Canadian research suggests. "We found the more types of violence the individual had been exposed to during their childhood, the greater the odds of migraine," study author Sarah Brennenstuhl, from the University of Toronto, said in a university news release. "For those who reported all three types of adversities -- [witnessing] parental domestic violence, childhood...

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Plane Passengers' Near-Death Experience Gives Clues to Trauma's Effect on Brain

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, July 3, 2015 -- A study involving people who thought they were about to die in a plane crash reveals new clues to the long-term impact that traumatic events have on the brain. In August of 2001, passengers on Air Transat flight 236 were on an overnight flight from Toronto to Lisbon, Portugal, when their plane ran out of fuel over the Atlantic Ocean. Many on the harrowing flight thought they might die that night, but in the end the plane was able to make an emergency landing on a small...

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Noise From Fireworks Threatens Young Ears

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, July 3, 2015 -- The Fourth of July weekend is a time for celebrations and beautiful fireworks displays. But, parents do need to take steps to protect their children's ears from loud fireworks, a hearing expert cautions. "Fireworks can be harmful to a child's ears," Dr. Laura Swibel Rosenthal, a pediatric ear, nose and throat doctor at Loyola University Health System in Chicago, said in a health system news release. "It is rare, but I have seen problems such as hearing loss and a...

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Many New Teen Drivers 'Crash' in Simulated Driving Task

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, JULY 3, 2015 -- Around four in 10 newly licensed teen drivers "crashed" in a simulated driving test, suggesting that many adolescents lack the skills they need to stay safe on the road, according to a new study. The simulated driving assessment (SDA) included a 35-minute "drive" replicating 22 variations of the most common scenarios that often cause teens to crash. "During the SDA, 42.9 percent of teens within three months of licensure, and 29.4 percent of experienced adult drivers had...

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Health Tip: Should I Bandage a Wound?

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

-- Proper wound care can promote healing and ward off infection. The American Academy of Family Physicians advises: An unbandaged wound typically stays more dry and heals more quickly. Wounds that may become dirty or may be irritated by clothing should be bandaged. Use bandages with an adhesive strip and sterile gauze. Change the bandage daily. Use an occlusive bandage (air-tight and anti-bacterial) for a large wound to help it stay moist and clean.

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Health Tip: Keep Kids Safe Outdoors

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

-- A few rules from parents or guardians can help keep children safe while they get exercise and enjoy the great outdoors. The extension.org website suggests: Never allow children to play outside without supervision. Explain to children that they should never play near a street or driveway. Teach children to ask an adult for help for any object that rolls into the street or driveway. Regularly inspect outdoor play areas, removing hazards such as sharp tools, lawn equipment, animal feces, sharp...

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Gene Therapy for Cystic Fibrosis Shows Some Promise in Study

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 -- Gene therapy for cystic fibrosis has for the first time shown slight but significant benefit on lung function, new British research reveals. In a randomized trial, patients inhaled molecules of DNA that aimed to replace the defective gene responsible for cystic fibrosis with a healthy, working copy of the gene in the lungs. "Patients who received the gene therapy showed a significant, if modest, benefit in tests of lung function compared with the placebo group, and...

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Behind Many High-Achieving Children...

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 -- Talented children who reach their potential likely have dedicated parents to thank for their success, a new study found. Researchers at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln found that parents play a vital role in helping their kids achieve a national or world-class ranking in their sport, instrument or other pursuit. "Talent might partially be born, but it is largely made -- made by parents who devote their full measure to fostering their children's talent development,"...

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Rapid Response Guidelines May Improve Children's Stroke Care

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 -- A rapid response plan for children who visit the emergency room with stroke-like symptoms can help doctors make a faster diagnosis, new research suggests. "Just as there are rapid response processes for adults with a possible stroke, there should be a rapid response process for children with a possible stroke that includes expedited evaluation and imaging or rapid transfer to a medical center with pediatric stroke expertise," senior study author Dr. Lori Jordan, an...

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Americans' Risk of Dying From Cancer Is Falling, CDC Finds

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 -- The risk that any one American will die from cancer -- the cancer death rate -- is going down, regardless of sex or race, a new government study reports. However, because the United States has a growing aging population, the overall number of people dying from cancer is on the rise, officials from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported. "While we are making progress in reducing cancer death rates, we still have real work to do to reduce cancer...

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Many Americans Trying to Cut Their Salt Intake: CDC

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 -- Worried about links between high daily salt intake, high blood pressure and stroke, half of American adults questioned in a recent poll say they've tried to cut back on sodium. The survey of more than 180,000 people from 26 states, Puerto Rico and Washington, D.C., found -- perhaps not surprisingly -- that people already diagnosed with high blood pressure were more likely to shun the salt shaker. "Excess sodium intake is a major risk factor for hypertension, and...

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Migraine's Link to Higher Heart Disease Risk May Not Be Genetic

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 -- People who have migraines have a greater risk for heart disease, but their genes may not be to blame for the connection, new research suggests. Scientists looked at two large studies that pinpointed genetic variations that can increase the risk for migraine and heart disease. The first study included almost 20,000 people with migraine and more than 55,000 people who didn't have these severe headaches. The second study involved more than 21,000 people with heart...

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Mass Killings, School Shootings in U.S. May Be 'Contagious'

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 -- Mass killings and school shootings in the United States may be "contagious," inspiring similar killing sprees, new research suggests. "The hallmark of contagion is observing patterns of many events that are bunched in time, rather than occurring randomly in time," study author Sherry Towers, a research professor at Arizona State University's Simon A. Levin Mathematical, Computational and Modeling Sciences Center, said in a university news release. Researchers from...

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Orkambi Approved for Cystic Fibrosis

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 -- Orkambi (lumacaftor and ivacaftor) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat cystic fibrosis in patients who have inherited two copies of a specific gene mutation from their parents. The F508del mutation causes production of an abnormal protein that disrupts transport of water and chloride through the body, the FDA said Thursday in a news release. Having two copies of this gene mutation is the leading cause of cystic fibrosis, accounting for...

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Could Blue Eyes Raise Odds for Alcoholism?

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 -- People with blue eyes may be more likely to become alcoholics, a new study suggests. Genetic researchers at the University of Vermont said their findings could help doctors learn more about the roots of alcoholism, as well as other psychiatric disorders. Study co-author Dawei Li, an assistant professor of microbiology and molecular genetics, has worked with other scientists for years to build a genetic database of more than 10,000 people. Most of those in the...

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Drug Offers Hope Against Disease Where Sunlight Causes Pain

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 -- Just a few minutes of sun exposure can cause debilitating pain for people like Savannah Fulkerson, an 11-year-old with a rare genetic disorder. Scientists say a new medication may allow Savannah and others like her to encounter daylight without such severe consequences. Savannah has erythropoietic protoporphyria. "It's like she's allergic to the sun," her mother, Andrea Fulkerson, told multiple doctors as the family sought an explanation for the agony the child...

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Children with Autism Respond Differently to Smells: Study

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 -- Children with autism spectrum disorders appear to respond to stinky smells differently from children without autism, a new study found. The difference was pronounced enough that researchers could tell who had autism and who didn't about 80 percent of the time based only on "sniff responses." "The authors have hit upon a novel way of testing differences between children with autism and those without that indeed seems to suggest marked differences in how autistic...

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Naps May Boost Worker Productivity

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 -- Taking a nap while on the job might help workers be more productive, new research suggests. A University of Michigan study found power naps or extended breaks during the day could ease frustration, help offset impulsive behavior and increase workplace safety. "Our results suggest that napping may be a beneficial intervention for individuals who may be required to remain awake for long periods of time by enhancing the ability to persevere through difficult or...

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How to Avoid July Fourth Allergy Flare-Ups

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 -- Fireworks, picnics and parades are favorite Fourth of July traditions for many people, but for those with allergies or asthma these activities could be uncomfortable or even dangerous. "Summer is the time of year when everyone wants to enjoy being outside," said allergist Dr. James Sublett, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. "That's why it's so important to be prepared, so allergies and asthma don't overshadow the...

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Summer Danger: BBQ Grill Brush Wires Causing Big Health Woes

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 -- Before you bite into that burger on Independence Day, you might want to ask the chef whether a rusty old grill brush was used to clean the barbecue. Wire bristles from grill brushes can snap off, land on the grate and find their way into grilled meats, public health experts warn. If ingested, these bristles can tear up a person's throat and digestive tract, causing potentially life-threatening injuries. "The worst are the bristles that make it all the way down to...

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