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Head Injury Tied to Long-Term Attention Issues in Kids

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, Aug. 3, 2015 -- Children who suffer even mild brain injuries may experience momentary lapses in attention long after their accident, new research finds. The study of 6- to 13-year-olds found these attention lapses led to lower behavior and intelligence ratings by their parents and teachers. "Parents, teachers and doctors should be aware that attention impairment after traumatic brain injury can manifest as very short lapses in focus, causing children to be slower," said study researcher...

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Severe 'Picky Eating' May Point to Mental Health Issues in Kids

Posted today in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, Aug. 3, 2015 -- A kid who is a seriously "picky eater" is also likely to struggle with emotional problems like anxiety and depression, new research suggests. About 3 percent of kids suffer from severe selective eating, to the extent that they can't eat out at a restaurant, said lead researcher Nancy Zucker, an eating disorders specialist at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C. These kids are more than twice as likely to be diagnosed with depression or social anxiety, when...

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Health Highlights: Aug 3, 2015

Posted today in Daily MedNews

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: NYC Legionnaires' Disease Outbreak Claims 4th Victim New numbers released Saturday by the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene show that the continuing outbreak of Legionnaires' disease has now claimed a fourth life, with 65 people now infected. City health officials note, however, that 20 people have been successfully treated for the respiratory ailment, USA Today...

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Health Tip: Plan to Eat Healthier

Posted today in Daily MedNews

-- A healthier diet can help you look and feel better. And when armed with the right information and some healthy snacks, eating well isn't that difficult. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases suggests: Limit your intake of pizza, sodas and sweet treats. Drink plenty of water and low-fat or fat-free milk. Lean dairy products will help build stronger bones. Fill half of your plate with fruits and veggies at each meal. Stick to lean meat and poultry, beans, eggs,...

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Health Tip: Avoid Canker Sore Pain

Posted today in Daily MedNews

-- Canker sores are painful lesions that tend to develop inside the cheek or lips, on the gums or under the tongue. The American Academy of Family Physicians offers this advice to help ease canker sore pain: Avoid chewing gum. Steer clear of foods that are particularly spicy, crunchy or hard. Use a soft toothbrush after every meal, and floss daily to rid your mouth of lingering food. Talk to your doctor if you develop frequent canker sores.

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Obese Kids a Universal Target for Bullies

Posted today in Daily MedNews

SUNDAY, Aug. 2, 2015 -- "Being fat" is seen as the most common reason why children are bullied, a new study reveals. Researchers who surveyed more than 2,800 adults in the United States, Canada, Iceland and Australia said at least 70 percent of respondents believed that weight was a common reason for bullying. A similar number regarded weight-related bullying as a serious or very serious problem. Weight-related bullying was considered to be more common than bullying for reasons such as...

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Health Highlights: Aug 2, 2015

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: NYC Legionnaires' Disease Outbreak Claims 4th Victim New numbers released Saturday by the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene show that the continuing outbreak of Legionnaires' disease has now claimed a fourth life, with 65 people now infected. City health officials note, however, that 20 people have been successfully treated for the respiratory ailment, USA Today...

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Health Highlights: Aug 1, 2015

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: NYC Legionnaires' Disease Outbreak Claims 4th Victim New numbers released Saturday by the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene show that the continuing outbreak of Legionnaires' disease has now claimed a fourth life, with 65 people now infected. City health officials note, however, that 20 people have been successfully treated for the respiratory ailment, USA Today...

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Add Asthma, Allergy Plans to Your Back-to-School List

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

SATURDAY, Aug. 1, 2015 -- If your child has asthma or allergies, make sure his or her teacher, principal and school nurse know about it as part of your back-to-school planning, the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) recommends. "More than 10 million kids under age 18 have asthma, and one in four suffer from respiratory allergies," ACAAI President Dr. James Sublett said in a news release from the organization. "Many kids with asthma and food allergies don't have a plan in...

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Many Older Americans Feel Prepared for Aging

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, July 31, 2015 -- Most older Americans feel they are prepared for the process of aging, but many have concerns about maintaining their physical and mental health as they get older, a new survey finds. The 2015 United States of Aging Survey of 1,000 adults 60 and older found that 86 percent felt prepared overall for the process of aging, and 42 percent said they are "very prepared" to age. Forty percent said they are most concerned about maintaining their physical health, while more...

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Kids' Hemophilia Drugs a Big Part of State Medicaid Spending

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, July 31, 2015 -- Treatment costs for one childhood illness, hemophilia, may use up a big chunk of a state's Medicaid budget, a new study out of California shows. The researchers found that treatments for hemophilia -- a rare, inherited disorder in which blood does not clot normally -- accounted for the largest share of spending on outpatient drugs among publicly insured children in California with serious chronic illnesses. The study "underscores the potential effect of new, expensive...

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Experimental Treatment Uses Nitric Oxide for Acne

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, July 31, 2015 -- There's no shortage of products out there that claim to treat the pimples that so often plague teen skin, but your body may already be making an effective treatment that just needs a little tweaking from science, a new study suggests. The treatment is nitric oxide, a substance produced and used throughout the human body. But, nitric oxide's benefits are usually short-lived, researchers explained. And, that's where science comes in. By slowing the release of nitric...

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More Progress Needed To Get Stroke Patients Rapid Care

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, July 31, 2015 -- Stroke victims still aren't getting treated soon enough, a new study suggests. Treating strokes quickly is critical, because the more time that elapses, the less effective stroke treatment may be, the researchers explained. A number of factors have reduced the time it takes stroke patients to get treatment. These include greater public awareness, better emergency dispatch procedures and improvements in hospital stroke units, the researchers said. But, delays in...

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Mountain Biker Survives After Neck Impaled by Tree Branch

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, July 31, 2015 -- A day out mountain biking went terribly wrong for one middle-aged man in New Mexico: He ended up with a tree branch impaled in his neck. Fortunately for the unnamed man, he had the good sense to leave the branch where it was and quickly seek help, according to a new case study published recently in the New England Journal of Medicine. The 40-year-old, who was in good health, initially set off on his mountain bike to ride an off-road trail in New Mexico. At some point...

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Noninvasive Stimulation Gets Legs Moving After Spinal Cord Injury

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, July 31, 2015 -- A noninvasive procedure might help people with paralysis move their legs without the need for surgery or implanted devices, new research suggests. The treatment approach is called transcutaneous stimulation, where a device delivers an electrical current to the spine through electrodes placed on the outside of the lower back. In a recent trial of the device, five paralyzed men were able to generate steplike movements. The men didn't walk, but moved while their legs...

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Too Much Facebook, Twitter Tied to Poor Mental Health in Teens

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, July 31, 2015 -- Teens who frequently use social media are more likely to say they struggle with mental health concerns that are not being addressed, new Canadian research reveals. At issue is the amount of time adolescents spend browsing and posting on sites such as Facebook, Twitter or Instagram. "It is difficult to speculate what mechanisms may link the use of social networking sites to mental health problems," said study author Dr. Hugues Sampasa-Kanyinga, from the department of...

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Mineral Supplement: Wild Chimps May Eat Clay for Health

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, July 31, 2015 -- Chimpanzees in Uganda have started eating clay to supplement the minerals in their diet, researchers report. The clay consumed by the chimps in the Budongo forest also helps them "detox" and digest their food, the study authors added. The scientists observed wild chimps in the forest eating and drinking from clay pits and termite mounds. This change in diet may be partly due to the widespread destruction of raffia palm trees that the chimps typically relied on for...

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Regular, Moderate Coffee Drinking Tied to Better Brain Health in Seniors

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, July 31, 2015 -- A study of more than 1,400 Italian seniors finds links between patterns of coffee consumption and their risk for "mild cognitive impairment" -- declines in memory and thinking that are often a precursor to dementia. The study could only point to associations, not cause-and-effect, the investigators said. But prior research has suggested that caffeine might impact neurological health. In the study, a team led by Dr. Vincenzo Solfrizzi of the University of Bari Aldo...

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Stay Safe When Temperatures Rise

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, July 31, 2015 -- Extremely hot weather can be deadly if you don't take the proper precautions, an expert warns. There were 123 heat-related deaths in the United States in 2014, according to the National Weather Service. "People suffer heat-related illnesses when their bodies are unable to compensate and properly cool themselves," Dr. Richard Schwartz, chair of emergency medicine at Georgia Regents University in Augusta, said in a university news release. Signs that the heat is...

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Smog Threatens Visitors to U.S. National Parks: Report

Posted 2 days ago in Daily MedNews

FRIDAY, July 31, 2015 -- Air pollution afflicts many national parks across the United States, a new study suggests. Air quality in some of the parks is as bad or worse than in some major cities because of pollution from sources such as coal-fired power stations, the National Parks Conservation Association says in a new report. "Our parks remain under threat from air pollution, harming visitors' health, reducing visibility, and driving the impacts of climate change," said Ulla Reeves, manager...

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