Daily MedNews

Get news by email or subscribe to our news feeds.

Seniors Should Remove Dentures at Bedtime

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 -- Seniors who wear their dentures when they sleep are at increased risk for pneumonia, according to new research. The study included 524 men and women, average age about 88, who were followed for three years. During that time, there were 28 hospitalizations and 20 deaths from pneumonia. Among the 453 denture wearers, the 41 percent who wore their dentures when they slept were about twice as likely to develop pneumonia as those who removed their dentures at night,...

Read more...

Weight-Loss Surgery May Raise Risk of Severe Headaches, Scientists Report

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 -- After weight-loss surgery, some patients may be at risk for developing severe headaches, a new study suggests. In a small number of people, the surgery was associated with a condition known as spontaneous intracranial hypotension -- or low blood pressure in the brain. The condition can trigger headaches while standing that disappear when lying down. These headaches can be accompanied by nausea, vomiting, neck stiffness and difficulty concentrating, the researchers...

Read more...

U.S. Ranks Last Among Wealthy Nations in Access to Health Care

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 -- The U.S. health care system ranks dead last compared to other industrialized nations when it comes to affordability and patient access, according to a new survey. The 2013 survey of the American health care landscape was conducted by the Commonwealth Fund just prior to the full implementation of the Obama administration's Affordable Care Act (ACA). "I would say that we found two things that really seem to drive the higher barriers to health care in the U.S.," said...

Read more...

Americans Show Distrust of Medical Profession in Survey

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 -- Americans are less trusting of the medical profession than people in many other countries -- even though they often like their own doctor, a new report finds. Based on data from an international health care survey, the United States is near the bottom of the list when it comes to public trust in the medical establishment, Harvard researchers report. On the other hand, when asked to rate their own medical care, Americans are among the most satisfied. Experts said the...

Read more...

Study Finds U.S. Diets Still Contain Too Many Bad Fats

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 -- Over the last three decades, Americans have cut their intake of artery-clogging saturated and trans fats -- but not enough, new research shows. Meanwhile, consumption of healthy omega-3 fatty acids known as DHA and EPA -- plentiful in fatty fish like salmon -- has remained steady, though very low, the experts found. "These trends are encouraging, but we still have room for improvement in our diet," said Mary Ann Honors, a post-doctoral research fellow at the...

Read more...

Taking a 'Selfie' May Help With Dermatology Care, Study Shows

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 -- While in-office visits may still be best, taking a photo of a skin lesion and sending it to your dermatologist for analysis may be a valuable piece of eczema care, a new study finds. "This study shows something interesting -- patients' eczema improved regardless whether they saw the doctor for follow-up in the office or communicated online," said one expert not connected to the study, Dr Gary Goldenberg of New York City. The new technology "gives patients another...

Read more...

Fertility Treatments Aren't Significantly Linked to Birth Defects

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 -- The risk of birth defects is low among children conceived using assisted reproductive technologies (ART), according to a new study. Researchers examined more than 300,000 births in Massachusetts between 2004 and 2008. Of those babies, 11,000 were conceived using ART. Assisted reproductive technologies include fertility treatments where both eggs and sperm are handled, such as in-vitro fertilization, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and...

Read more...

Many Americans in Debt, Bankruptcy Paying for Cancer Care

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 -- Besides the danger and worry from the disease itself, many Americans battling cancer are faced with high bills for medical care, two new reports show. One-third of cancer survivors in the United States say they have experienced money or work problems due to cancer care, while even many cancer patients who have insurance say they have had to change their lifestyle and medical care due to the financial burden of treatment, the research shows. The findings were...

Read more...

Controversial Chemical May Leach Into Skin From Cash Receipts

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 -- Touching cash register receipts can dramatically increase your body's absorption of a potentially dangerous chemical, bisphenol A (BPA), researchers report. BPA, originally created as an estrogen supplement, has been linked to developmental problems in infants and children, and cancer, obesity, diabetes and heart disease in adults, researchers say. The chemical is found in products ranging from plastic water bottles and food-can linings. It is also used as a print...

Read more...

All U.S. Residents Returning From Ebola-Stricken Countries to Be Tracked, CDC Says

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 -- Public health officials plan to actively monitor all U.S. residents returning home from one of the three Ebola-affected nations in West Africa, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Wednesday. The new monitoring program, which starts Monday, will require anyone back from Liberia, Guinea or Sierra Leone to check their temperature twice a day and report back daily to their local public health department, CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden said in a...

Read more...

Sleep Apnea Gear Doesn't Squelch Sex Life, Study Says

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 -- Your sex life is unlikely to suffer because of sleep apnea treatment, according to a new study. People with sleep apnea experience periods of disrupted breathing throughout sleep. This can lead to daytime fatigue, high blood pressure and other health conditions. The gold standard of sleep apnea treatment involves going to bed wearing a mask or nosepiece with a hose that's attached to a machine that provides a steady stream of air to keep the airways open during...

Read more...

Hospital Study Offers Solutions to 'Alarm Fatigue'

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 -- Monitoring devices among intensive care patients set off 2.5 million alarms in one month at a U.S. hospital, a new study of "alarm fatigue" shows. Alarm fatigue occurs when hospital staff become desensitized to the constant beeps and bleeps of alarms, and either ignore them or turn them off. The problem has been identified as a major issue by The Joint Commission, which accredits U.S. hospitals. "There have been news stories about patient deaths due to hospital...

Read more...

Recalled Supplements Linger on U.S. Store Shelves, Study Finds

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 -- Two-thirds of dietary supplements recalled by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) because they contained banned ingredients remained on store shelves at least six months after they were recalled, a new study finds. For example, in July 2013, researchers were able to purchase EverSlim -- a weight-loss supplement that had been recalled in February 2012 by the FDA. The product was recalled for containing sibutramine, a substance that's banned in the United...

Read more...

Depression After Heart Attack May Be More Common for Women

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 -- Women are at greater risk for anxiety and depression after a heart attack than men, a new study finds. Researchers looked at 160 patients in Lithuania who were interviewed at least one month after suffering a heart attack. About one-quarter of the patients were depressed and 28 percent of those had been treated with antidepressants. Women were more likely than men to have depression and anxiety, and the conditions were more severe in women, according to the...

Read more...

Discussing Ebola: Children Feel Safe, Calm When Adults Do, Too

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 -- With so much news focused on the Ebola epidemic in Africa, parents and other caregivers should think about how to help children feel safe, experts say. "Children are almost always listening," said Dr. Allison Baker, a pediatric psychopharmacologist at the Child Mind Institute in New York City. "They hear words and phrases, but this doesn't mean that they have the ability to contextualize it the way we as adults do." She said it's important not to underestimate how...

Read more...

Mutations Linked to Blood Cancers Rise With Age, Study Shows

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 -- Blood cell mutations linked to the blood cancers leukemia and lymphoma increase as people get older, according to a new study. Researchers analyzed blood samples from nearly 3,000 Americans, ages 10 to 90, and found the mutations in less than 1 percent of those ages 40 to 49. By the time people are between 70 and 79, 5 percent will have blood cell mutations, according to the study. For people between 80 and 89, more than 6 percent will be affected, the researchers...

Read more...

Y Chromosome Loss May Predict Earlier Death for Men

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 -- Elderly men who've lost the Y chromosome from their blood cells may be at increased risk for earlier death and death from cancer, a new study suggests. This age-related loss is common among men and could explain why men tend to die younger and have higher rates of certain cancers than women, who do not have a Y chromosome, the researchers say. The study authors analyzed blood samples from more than 1,150 men, aged 70 to 84, who were followed for up to 40 years. Men...

Read more...

Where Ebola Battles Are Won

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 -- Four hospitals that are home to advanced biocontainment facilities have become America's ground zero in the treatment of Ebola patients. Their special isolation units feature layer upon layer of safety measures to prevent the spread of nightmare pathogens, not just Ebola. They include special air filters, dunk tanks full of antiseptic, dedicated lab equipment and so-called autoclaves to sterilize any medical waste before it is transported from the unit. But they...

Read more...

Health Highlights: Oct. 22, 2014

Posted today in Daily MedNews

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: Utility Workers Face Charges for Not Testing Water for Brain-Eating Amoeba Two utility workers are facing charges for allegedly not testing three Louisiana towns' water supply for a deadly brain-eating amoeba and then trying to cover up their negligence. The 13,000 people in the three towns in St. John the Baptist Parish were told in late August that Naegleria fowleri had been found in...

Read more...

Health Tip: Anxiety Can Affect Your Health

Posted today in Daily MedNews

-- A person with generalized anxiety disorder describes someone who worries excessively, often making it difficult to get through the day. The Womenshealth.gov website says physical symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder include: Significant and unexplained fatigue. Aches, pains and tension in the muscles. Headaches. Twitching or trembling. Irritability. Difficulty swallowing. Sweating excessively. Hot flashes. Nausea, lightheadedness or shortness of breath. Going to the bathroom...

Read more...
Older articles
Hide
(web3)