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Mouse Study Reveals New Secrets of Fertilization

Posted today in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, April 17, 2014 -- Scientists report they have demystified how a sperm and egg couple, with new research in mice indicating that egg cells carry a special receptor that allows sperm to attach to and fertilize eggs. The British study, published online April 16 in the journal Nature, may offer new ways to improve both fertility treatments and contraceptives in people, with experts saying that human eggs also have protein receptors crucial to the meeting of sperm and egg. A similar...

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Small Childbirth Change Might Help Prevent Iron Deficiency in Babies: Study

Posted today in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, April 17, 2014 -- Changing how newborns are held immediately after birth could boost the use of delayed cord clamping and potentially reduce the number of infants with iron deficiency, according to a new study. Waiting until about two minutes after birth to clamp the umbilical cord allows more blood to pass from the mother's placenta to the baby, which lowers the risk of iron deficiency during infancy, previous research has found. Current guidelines suggest that the baby be held at...

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Scientists Find New Way to Observe 'Good' Brown Fat

Posted today in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, April 17, 2014 -- In a possible advance for obesity research, an MRI scan has pinpointed "good" brown fat in a living adult for the first time. The researchers say their success could help efforts to fight obesity and diabetes. Unlike white fat, brown fat is considered good because it burns calories and helps control weight. Learning more about brown fat could lead to new ways to improve people's health, the scientists said. "This is an exciting area of study that requires further...

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Bacteria May Survive Longer in Contact Lens Solution Than Thought

Posted today in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, April 17, 2014 -- Bacteria that can cause serious eye infections are able to survive longer in contact lens cleaning solution than previously known, a new study finds. Researchers looked at different strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which can cause microbial keratitis. This is an inflammation and ulceration of the cornea that can cause vision loss. The investigators tested nine strains of P. aeruginosa gathered from hospital patients in Britain and compared them to P. aeruginosa...

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School Bans on Chocolate Milk May Backfire

Posted today in Daily MedNews

THURSDAY, April 17, 2014 -- Banning chocolate milk from schools may sound like a good move for kids' health, but efforts to do so haven't turned out that way, a small study found. Bans on chocolate milk in 11 Oregon elementary schools were linked to a big drop in the amount of healthy, fat-free white milk students drank, a team of Cornell University researchers reports. Nicole Zammit, former assistant director of nutrition services at the Eugene School District in Oregon, wasn't surprised by...

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Health Tip: Avoid Diaper Rash

Posted today in Daily MedNews

-- Diaper rash can be sore and painful for your little one, but there are things you can do to help keep diaper rash at bay. The American Academy of Pediatrics says diaper rash can be triggered by: Excessive moisture in or near the diaper. Chafing of the skin. Prolonged exposure to stool or urine. A yeast or bacterial infection. An allergic reaction to something in the diaper.

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Health Tip: Avoid Emotional Driving

Posted today in Daily MedNews

-- Your emotions can hinder your ability to drive safely, so you should keep them in check while you're behind the wheel. The Department of Motor Vehicles offers these suggestions: If you feel angry, upset or annoyed, pull off the road and take a break. Take a few deep breaths. If you are anxious, worried or depressed about something, try to think of other things until you reach your destination. Listen to music. Allow yourself extra time so you don't feel rushed, hurried or impatient.

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Misdiagnoses Common Among U.S. Outpatients: Review

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 -- At least 5 percent of American adults -- 12 million people -- are misdiagnosed in outpatient settings every year, and half of these errors could be harmful, a new study indicates. The findings, from an analysis of data from several published studies, should lead to greater efforts to monitor and reduce the number of misdiagnoses that occur in primary care, said Dr. Hardeep Singh, at Baylor College of Medicine, and colleagues. Primary care is given outside the...

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Chimps Prefer Firm 'Mattress'

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 -- Like many people, chimpanzees are picky about their beds, a new study finds. Specifically, these primate cousins prefer firm and stable types of wood to build beds or nests in trees, according to the study published April 16 in the journal PLoS One. "Chimpanzees, like humans, are highly selective when it comes to where they sleep," said researcher David Samson of the University of Nevada. "This suggests that for apes there is something inherently attractive about a...

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Leeches Help Save Woman's Ear After Pit Bull Mauling

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 -- A savage pit bull attack results in the total dismembering of a teenage girl's ear. And though the ear remains fully intact, complications during the initial reattachment process raise the real risk she could lose her ear forever. What's a doctor to do? If you're Dr. Stephen Sullivan, a Rhode Island Hospital plastic surgeon, you turn to the visually repulsive yet uniquely beneficial blood-sucking power of leeches. "The patient's situation was very precarious,"...

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Diabetes Complication Rates Drop Among U.S. Adults

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 -- The rates of five serious complications from diabetes -- heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, amputations and death -- have all dropped dramatically since 1990, a new U.S. government study shows. Heart attack rates have decreased nearly 70 percent in people with diabetes. Stroke rates have dropped by more than 50 percent, as have lower extremity amputations. Deaths from high blood sugar crises have fallen nearly 65 percent, and the risk of end-stage kidney disease...

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Placing Donor Windpipe First in Patient's Arm Helps With Transplant

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 -- Doctors in Belgium say they've successfully transplanted windpipes in six patients by first placing donor tissue in the patients' arms. "This discovery expands the surgical possibilities for people struggling with difficult-to-repair airway defects," said Dr. Pierre Delaere, of the department of otolaryngology--head and neck surgery at University Hospital Leuven. The windpipe, or trachea, is part of the respiratory tract. It allows air to pass from the nose or mouth...

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Free Drug Samples for Doctors Might Prove Costly for Patients

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 -- Dermatologists who receive free drug samples are more likely to give their patients prescriptions for expensive medicines, a new study says. Researchers looked at data on prescriptions for adult acne medications written in 2010 by dermatologists across the United States. For a single visit, the average retail cost of prescriptions for patients whose doctors received free samples from drug makers was about $465, compared with about $200 for patients whose doctors did...

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Key Brain 'Networks' May Differ in Autism, Study Suggests

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 -- Differences in brain connectivity may help explain the social impairments common in those who have autism spectrum disorders, new research suggests. The small study compared the brains of 25 teens with an autism spectrum disorder to those of 25 typically developing teens, all aged 11 to 18. The researchers found key differences between the two groups in brain "networks" that help people to figure out what others are thinking, and to understand others' actions and...

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Apathy Might Signal Brain Shrinkage in Old Age: Study

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 -- Older adults who show signs of apathy tend to have a smaller brain volume than their peers with more vim and vigor, a new study suggests. Researchers found that of more than 4,300 older adults, those with at least two symptoms of apathy had slightly less gray matter and white matter in their brains. Gray matter basically acts as the brain's information-processing centers, while white matter is like the wiring connecting those centers. Experts said it's not clear...

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Experimental Measles Drug Shows Promise in Animal Trials

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 -- Scientists have successfully tested in animals a new drug that might one day protect people infected with measles from getting sick, according to a new report. "In people who are not vaccinated against measles due to health issues -- like severe immune-compromised people, for example, cancer patients -- this drug could provide protection in case they were exposed to measles," said lead researcher Richard Plemper, a professor at Georgia State University's Institute...

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Cancer 'Vaccine' for Advanced Disease Passes Early Hurdle

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 -- Researchers report early progress in developing a treatment that might one day help the immune system defend itself against cancer. The results of their study -- the first of three stages of research required of drug treatments in the United States -- suggest the treatment is safe. But they don't prove it works or which patients it could help. Nor do the researchers offer definitive details about factors such as cost. Still, the findings are an example of "really...

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Your 'Healthy' Bacteria Are as Individual as You Are

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 -- When it comes to the communities of helpful bacteria living in and on people, "one-size-fits-all" is definitely not the rule, a new study finds. A team at the University of Michigan found wide variation in the types of bacteria that healthy people have in their digestive tracts and elsewhere, suggesting that beneficial communities of microbes come in many different forms. Each person has a unique collection of bacterial communities arising from their life history,...

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Crunchy or Smooth? Food's Texture May Sway Perception of Calories

Posted today in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 -- Creamy butter or ice cream versus a crunchy granola bar: A new study suggests that the texture of foods influences people's dieting choices. "We studied the link between how a food feels in your mouth and the amount we eat, the types of food we choose, and how many calories we think we are consuming," wrote study authors Dipayan Biswas and Courtney Szocs, both from the University of South Florida, and others. In one experiment, participants were asked to sample...

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Yoga Big on West Coast, Chiropractors Popular in Midwest

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

WEDNESDAY, April 16, 2014 -- Folks on the West Coast are faithful followers of yoga and meditation. Midwesterners turn to chiropractors or osteopathic doctors for their aches and pains. And nearly one in every five Americans uses herbal supplements like ginseng, Echinacea, ginkgo biloba and St. John's Wort. Those are just some of the findings of a new federal government report on complementary and alternative medicine trends in the United States. The report, derived from national health...

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