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Keep Your Teens Safe on the Road This Summer

Posted today in Daily MedNews

TUESDAY, July 22, 2014 -- Car crashes are the leading cause of accidental death among American teens, and parents need to take steps to keep their teens safe when they're on the road this summer, an expert says. The period between Memorial Day and Labor Day is the deadliest time of the year for teen drivers and passengers, according to the AAA auto club. "Even more than drinking and driving -- which, thanks to strong messaging, is at an all-time low -- distracted driving is a huge problem for...

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Tips for Beating BBQ Burns

Posted today in Daily MedNews

TUESDAY, July 22, 2014 -- Summer's the season for grilling outside, but mishaps can happen even to the most experienced grillmaster. Before lighting up your grill, get up to speed on how to treat minor burns. It's also a good idea to learn how to recognize signs of a more serious injury, advised Dr. Sampson Davis, an emergency room physician at Meadowlands Hospital Medical Center in New Jersey. "Although most burns can be treated at home, more serious burns can lead to infection, dehydration...

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Obesity During Pregnancy Linked to Raised Asthma Risk in Kids

Posted today in Daily MedNews

TUESDAY, July 22, 2014 -- Women who are obese during pregnancy may be more likely to have children with asthma than normal-weight mothers, a new review suggests. "We found that, compared with children born from mothers of normal weight, those whose mothers were overweight or obese during pregnancy had up to 20 to 30 percent higher odds of asthma," said lead researcher Dr. Erick Forno, an assistant professor of pediatrics at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh. Forno's team also found that...

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American Red Cross Issues Urgent Call for Blood Donations

Posted today in Daily MedNews

TUESDAY, July 22, 2014 -- Blood donations to the American Red Cross are down substantially, and the agency says an "emergency situation" could arise within weeks. "Donations through the Red Cross are down approximately 8 percent over the last 11 weeks, resulting in about 80,000 fewer donations than expected," the agency said in a statement released Tuesday. "The number of donors continues to decline." The looming blood shortage can be blamed, in part, on the calendar: This year, July Fourth...

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High-Salt Diets Could Double Risk of Heart Woes for Diabetics

Posted today in Daily MedNews

TUESDAY, July 22, 2014 -- A diet loaded with salt is associated with double the risk of heart attack or stroke in people with type 2 diabetes. The risk skyrockets even higher among those whose diabetes isn't well-managed, a new Japanese study reports. The study found that people with diabetes who consumed an average of 5.9 grams of sodium daily had double the risk of developing heart disease than those who consumed, on average, 2.8 grams of sodium daily. In addition, heart disease risk jumped...

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Injuries on the Increase in High School Lacrosse, Study Shows

Posted today in Daily MedNews

TUESDAY, July 22, 2014 -- High school lacrosse players are facing an increasing number of injuries during practices as well as games, a new study finds. Although the most common injuries are sprains and strains, more than 22 percent are concussions, researchers report. They note a better understanding of why these injuries are happening could lead to better ways to protect student athletes. "Concern over concussions in both boys' and girls' lacrosse underscores the need to learn more about...

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Study Casts Doubt on Costly Treatment for Leg Clots

Posted today in Daily MedNews

TUESDAY, July 22, 2014 -- Two treatments that break up blood clots deep in the veins of the legs appear no different in terms of death risk. However, one results in a greater risk of bleeding and average hospitalization bills that are three times the cost of the other treatment, a new study finds. The standard treatment for these clots -- known as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) -- is blood-thinning medications and compression stockings. The other, more expensive treatment delivers medication...

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2 Courts, 2 Different Decisions on Key Obamacare Provision

Posted today in Daily MedNews

TUESDAY, July 22, 2014 -- In a wild day for Obamacare, two federal appeals courts arrived at completely different conclusions Tuesday on the use of financial subsidies provided to millions of Americans who bought health insurance through the federal HealthCare.gov website exchange. The conflicting opinions suggest that the matter is headed for a showdown in the U.S. Supreme Court. In a 2-1 ruling, the U.S. Appeals Court for the District of Columbia Circuit said that the subsidies may only be...

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Technique Used in Some Hysterectomies May Help Spread Cancer: Study

Posted today in Daily MedNews

TUESDAY, July 22, 2014 -- Removing the uterus with a minimally invasive procedure known as morcellation carries a risk of spreading undetected cancer, and now a new study pinpoints the likelihood more clearly. Twenty-seven of every 10,000 women who had the technique had undetected uterine cancer at the time of the procedure, researchers found, with the odds being highest for patients over the age of 65. Surgeons performing a hysterectomy with morcellation use a power cutter to slice uterine...

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Gene Discoveries Could Shed New Light on Schizophrenia

Posted today in Daily MedNews

TUESDAY, July 22, 2014 -- One of the largest studies ever conducted into the genetic origins of a psychiatric disorder has uncovered 83 new sites on chromosomes that harbor inherited genes tied to schizophrenia. The findings, made by an international team of researchers, now bring the total number of common gene variants linked to the disorder to 108. Although these schizophrenia-associated genes aren't specific enough to be used as a test to predict who will or will not develop the illness,...

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Sleepless Nights After Divorce May Be Tied to Blood Pressure Rise

Posted today in Daily MedNews

TUESDAY, July 22, 2014 -- People who suffer long-term sleep problems after a divorce are at risk for a rise in blood pressure, a new study suggests. Previous research has linked divorce to major health problems and even early death, but few studies have examined the reasons for this link. Sleep trouble may be one of the causes, according to the University of Arizona investigators. Their study included 138 people who had been separated or divorced for about 16 weeks. They reported on the...

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Obamacare Dealt Setback by Federal Appeals Court

Posted today in Daily MedNews

TUESDAY, July 22, 2014 -- In a bombshell ruling that could potentially play havoc with Obamacare, a federal appeals court said Tuesday that the financial subsidies provided to millions of Americans who bought health insurance though the federal HealthCare.gov website exchange are illegal. In a 2-1 ruling, the federal appeals court for the District of Columbia said that as the law is written, the subsidies may only be provided to people who buy health plans in states that run their own health...

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Health Highlights: July 22, 2014

Posted today in Daily MedNews

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: Judge Says FDA Can't Use Panel's Report on Menthols A 2011 expert advisory panel's report on menthol cigarettes can't be used by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration because some panel members have conflicts of interest, a federal judge ruled on Monday. The FDA conducted an independent review of the impact on public health of menthol cigarettes since the 2011 report, but the judge's new...

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Blood Test Might Help Predict Survival With Lou Gehrig's Disease

Posted today in Daily MedNews

TUESDAY, July 22, 2014 -- Simple blood tests may one day help predict survival and the course of the disease in people with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also called Lou Gehrig's disease, Italian researchers report. The components in the blood that might yield clues to how fast ALS is progressing are called albumin and creatinine. These components are normally tested to follow kidney and liver health, according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine. But now it appears that these...

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MERS Virus Found in Air in Camel Barn

Posted today in Daily MedNews

TUESDAY, July 22, 2014 -- Genetic fragments of the deadly MERS virus were detected in the air of a barn where an infected camel was kept, a new study says. The findings show the need for further studies to determine if Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) can be transmitted through the air, the researchers said. Researchers collected air samples over three consecutive days from a camel barn owned by a 43-year-old male MERS patient who lived south of the town of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The...

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Parents of Children With Autism Need Help, Too

Posted today in Daily MedNews

TUESDAY, July 22, 2014 -- Most therapies for autism focus on the child, but new research suggests the child's stressed-out parents could benefit from treatments designed specifically for them. Mothers of autistic children who took part in a coping skills program found they connected better with their child and felt less stress, anxiety and depression, report researchers at Vanderbilt University, in Nashville. "Interventions have, for good reasons, been focused on the child, but what was...

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Health Tip: Soothing Bug Bites

Posted today in Daily MedNews

-- Nothing can ruin a nice summer evening faster than being bitten by bugs. The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests how to take the sting out of those itchy or painful bumps: Use calamine lotion liberally, taking care to avoid the eyes and genitals. Apply a cold compress to areas that are irritated. For bee or wasp stings, soak a cloth in cold water and hold over the sting. Promptly remove a stinger if stung by a bee to stem the release of venom. Consult a doctor before applying any...

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Health Tip: Working Out at Work

Posted today in Daily MedNews

-- Finding ways to exercise at work can save you time and help make sure you get enough physical activity. The American Council on Exercise offers these tips to help you get exercise during your work day: Exercise during your commute, if possible. Ride your bike or walk part of the route. Find simple ways to exercise, such as getting to work early and walking for 30 minutes around the building. Or work out at the end of the day while letting traffic dissipate. Ask a buddy to take a...

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Can You Name That Pill?

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

Maybe this sounds like a cable TV game show, but it's not. Every month millions of Americans pick up their prescription at the pharmacy, only to discover that their pill looks different than the month before. Last month’s oval, white pills embossed with “3972V” are now round, and display imprint “ML24”. Green, round pills are now green rectangles. Change is good, but not necessarily at the pharmacy. Even though some of us realize that the pharmacy has replaced last month's generic...

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Scientists Snipped HIV Out of Human DNA

Posted yesterday in Daily MedNews

MONDAY, July 21, 2014 -- A recently developed molecular tool allowed researchers to remove HIV from cultured human cells in the lab. The team of scientists at Temple University School of Medicine in Philadelphia said their approach may one day lead to a permanent treatment for HIV. They added that this technique might also be used to develop a vaccine to offer protection against the disease in the future. "Since HIV-1 is never cleared by the immune system, removal of the virus is required in...

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