Artificial Grape Flavor

Excipient (pharmacologically inactive substance)

What is Artificial Grape Flavor?

Artificial grape flavor is a flavor used in medicine to mask or impart taste to medications. A flavor, as used in the pharmaceutical industry for inactive ingredients, refers to natural or artificial tastes, which may include fragrances and colors of the flavoring. Flavors are used for orally consumed products such as syrups, chewable tablets, suspensions, or gums that impart beneficial therapeutic effect, as well. Grape is a common and popular flavor used in children's medications.

The U.S. Code of Federal Regulations describes a natural flavorant as: the essential oil, oleoresin, essence or extractive, protein hydrolysate, distillate, or any product of roasting, heating or enzymolysis, which contains the flavoring constituents derived from a spice, fruit or fruit juice, vegetable or vegetable juice, edible yeast, herb, bark, bud, root, leaf or similar plant material, meat, seafood, poultry, eggs, dairy products, or fermentation products thereof, whose significant function in food is flavoring rather than nutritional.

Artificial flavors include any substance, the function of which is to impart flavor, which is not derived from a spice, fruit or fruit juice, vegetable or vegetable juice, edible yeast, herb, bark, bud, root, leaf or similar plant material, meat, fish, poultry, eggs, dairy products, or fermentation products thereof.[1]

[1] The Code of Federal Regulations. Title 21. Food and Drugs. Vol. 2. 2010-04-01. 101.22. Foods; labeling of spices, flavorings, colorings and chemical preservatives.

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