Thiamine Dosage

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Usual Adult Dose for:

Usual Pediatric Dose for:

Additional dosage information:

Usual Adult Dose for Beriberi

10 to 20 mg IM three times daily for up to 2 weeks. Thereafter, use an oral therapeutic multivitamin preparation containing 5 to 10 mg thiamine daily for one month. A complete and balanced diet should follow.

Neuritis of pregnancy:
If vomiting severe to preclude oral therapy, give 5 to 10 mg IM daily.

'Wet' with myocardial failure:
Treat as an emergency cardiac condition. Thiamine is administered slowly by the IV route.

Usual Adult Dose for Thiamine Deficiency

If dextrose administered: to patients with marginal thiamine status, give 100 mg in each of the first few liters of IV fluid to avoid precipitating heart failure.

Usual Adult Dose for Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation

50 to 100 mg orally once a day

Usual Adult Dose for Wernicke's Encephalopathy

100 mg IV as an initial dose followed by 50 to 100 mg/day IM or IV until the patient is on a regular, balanced, diet.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Beriberi

10 to 25 mg IM or IV daily (if critically ill), or 10 to 50 mg orally every day for 2 weeks, then 5 to 10 mg orally daily for 1 month. If collapse occurs: 25 mg IV. Administer with caution.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Thiamine Deficiency

If dextrose administered: to patients with marginal thiamine status, give 100 mg in each of the first few liters of IV fluid to avoid precipitating heart failure.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation

Infants: 0.3 to 0.5 mg orally once a day; children: 0.5 to 1 mg orally once a day.

Renal Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Liver Dose Adjustments

Data not available

Dose Adjustments

If hypersensitivity to thiamine is suspected, administer a skin test: one-hundredth of the dose intradermally and observe patient for at least 30 minutes. If no reaction occurs, full dose can be administered.

Precautions

Serious hypersensitivity/anaphylactic reactions have been reported, especially after repeated administration. A skin test should be performed on patients who are suspected of drug allergies or previous reactions to thiamine, and any positive responders should not receive thiamine by injection.

Deaths have been reported after the use of IV or IM administration of thiamine.

Thiamine injection contains aluminum. Toxic levels of aluminum may occur if prolonged parenteral administration is used in patients with kidney impairment.

Dialysis

Data not available

Other Comments

Oral thiamine may be given with or without food.

Parenteral thiamine should be administered IM or by slow IV injection.

Dietary sources of thiamine include pork, beef, whole grains, yeast , fresh vegetables and legumes.

Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA) in Adults:
Males: 1.2 mg daily
Female: 1.1 mg daily

Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) in Pediatrics:
1 to 3 years: 0.5 mg/day
4 to 8 years: 0.6 mg/day
9 to 13 years: 0.9 mg/day

Males -14 to 18 years: 1.2 mg/day

Females - 14 to 18 years: 1.0 mg/day

Average Adequate Intake (AI) for healthy breast-fed infants:
0 to 6 months: 0.2 mg/day

7 to 12 months: 0.3 mg/day

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