Superficial Mass Needle Biopsy

What you should know

A superficial mass needle biopsy is a procedure to remove cells or tissue located just under your skin. A fine needle aspiration (FNA) biopsy is used to remove a sample of cells or fluid. A core needle biopsy is used to remove tissue. The samples are then sent to a lab and tested for cancer.

Care Agreement

You have the right to help plan your care. Learn about your health condition and how it may be treated. Discuss treatment options with your caregivers to decide what care you want to receive. You always have the right to refuse treatment.

Risks

  • You may have pain or bruising in the area where you had your biopsy. You may get an infection where the needle entered your body. The needle may cause nerve damage. You may bleed more than expected. If you have cancer, your biopsy may not show it. The needle may break cancer cells and cause cancer to spread to other tissue or organs.

  • If you do not have this procedure, your caregiver may not know the cause of the mass. Without the procedure, treatment may be delayed and your condition could get worse.

Getting Ready

Before your procedure:

  • Ask your caregiver if you need to stop using aspirin or any other prescribed or over-the-counter medicine before your procedure or surgery.

  • Your caregiver will ask you about your medical history and examine you. Your caregiver may use an ultrasound, MRI, or x-ray to help guide him during the biopsy. He may also test your blood. Ask your caregiver for more information about tests that you may need. Write down the date, time, and location of each test.

  • Write down the correct date, time, and location of your procedure.

The day of your procedure:

You or a close family member will be asked to sign a legal document called a consent form. It gives caregivers permission to do the procedure or surgery. It also explains the problems that may happen, and your choices. Make sure all your questions are answered before you sign this form.

Treatment

What will happen:

  • Your caregiver will inject anesthesia medicine into the skin near the mass to numb the area. If your caregiver is doing an FNA biopsy, he will put the needle into the mass and pull fluid into a syringe. He will move the needle back and forth inside the mass and remove more than one sample of cells.

  • If you have a core needle biopsy, your caregiver will make a small incision next to the mass. He will put the needle into the incision and remove the tissue sample. He may use an ultrasound or other device to help him find the best place to remove cells or tissue.

After your procedure:

A small bandage may be placed over the area where the needle was put into your skin. Your caregiver may have you put pressure on this bandage to help decrease swelling. Do not get out of bed until your caregiver says it is okay. When your caregiver sees that you are okay, you may be able to go home.

Contact a caregiver if

  • You have a fever.

  • You have pain near the mass.

  • The skin around your mass is red or swollen.

  • You cannot make it to your procedure on time.

  • You have questions or concerns about your procedure.

© 2014 Truven Health Analytics Inc. Information is for End User's use only and may not be sold, redistributed or otherwise used for commercial purposes. All illustrations and images included in CareNotes® are the copyrighted property of A.D.A.M., Inc. or Truven Health Analytics.

The above information is an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatments. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before following any medical regimen to see if it is safe and effective for you.

Learn more about Superficial Mass Needle Biopsy (Precare)

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