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Related terms: Complex Partial Seizure, Fits, Absence Seizure

Health Tip: Travel Safely in the Air

Posted 18 days ago by Drugs.com

-- A little preparation can help you stay healthy and safe when traveling by plane. The American Academy of Family Physicians recommends: Packing all necessary medications in a carry-on bag. Talk to your doctor about whether you should change your medication regimen while traveling. Pack some extras, in case your trip is extended. If you have a chronic illness such as epilepsy or diabetes, carry an identification card with your doctor's contact information and a list of your medications. Drink non-alcoholic, no-caffeine beverages to avoid dehydration. If you tend to have ear pain, take a decongestant before you fly, or chew gum. Stretch calves frequently, and walk around when it is safe to do so. Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Seizures, Epilepsy, Seizure Prevention, Diabetes, Type 1, Dehydration, Seizure Prophylaxis, Diabetes Mellitus

High-Pitched Sounds May Trigger Seizures in Cats

Posted 28 Apr 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 28, 2015 – High-pitched sounds may trigger seizures in cats, particularly older felines, a new study says. Although many veterinarians are unaware of this connection, the louder the sound, the more severe the seizure, British researchers contend. Cat owners around the world were surveyed by scientists at University College London's School of Pharmacy, to find out if their pets had seizures or involuntary jerking motions in response to certain sounds. The researchers found hundreds of people noticed this behavior in their cats. They also found local vets had no answers for why cats reacted this way. The researchers compiled detailed information on 96 cats, including the type of seizures they had, how long they lasted, and the sound that seemed to trigger the reaction. The study, published April 27 in the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, found some cats do seemingly ... Read more

Related support groups: Seizures, Keppra, Seizure Prevention, Levetiracetam, Seizure Prophylaxis, Keppra XR

Medical Groups Issue Guidelines for Treating First Seizure

Posted 20 Apr 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 20, 2015 – One in 10 people worldwide will have a seizure in his or her lifetime, experts say. Now, two medical groups have issued a new guideline on how to treat them. The decision to treat a patient after a first seizure is complex because doctors must weigh the risks and benefits on an individual basis, according to the American Academy of Neurology and the American Epilepsy Society. After a review of all available evidence, the two organizations concluded that taking epilepsy drugs immediately after a first seizure may reduce the risk of more seizures. The guideline, published in the April 21 issue of the journal Neurology, will be presented this week at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology, in Washington, D.C. "This is a valuable new guideline that could change the approach many doctors take to treating a first seizure and could improve patients' ... Read more

Related support groups: Seizures, Seizure Prevention, Seizure Prophylaxis

Liquid Medical Marijuana Shows Promise Against Severe Epilepsy

Posted 13 Apr 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 13, 2015 – A liquid form of medical marijuana may help people with severe epilepsy that does not respond to other treatments, according to a new report. The study included 213 child and adult patients with 12 different types of severe epilepsy. Some of them had Dravet syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, which are types of epilepsy that can cause intellectual disability and lifelong seizures. The patients took a liquid form of medical marijuana, called cannabidiol, daily for 12 weeks. Among the 137 people who completed the study, the number of seizures fell by an average of 54 percent, according to a team led by Dr. Orrin Devinsky, of New York University Langone Comprehensive Epilepsy Center in New York City. Among the 23 patients with Dravet syndrome who completed the study, the number of convulsive seizures fell by 53 percent, the investigators found. The 11 patients ... Read more

Related support groups: Seizures, Epilepsy, Seizure Prevention, Seizure Prophylaxis

Too Few Kids With Epilepsy, Cerebral Palsy Get Flu Shot: Study

Posted 10 Apr 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, April 10, 2015 – Children with neurological disorders such as epilepsy or cerebral palsy are at increased risk for complications from the flu, but are no more likely to receive a flu shot than other kids are, a new U.S. study shows. It's possible that many doctors don't know that some of these disorders put children at increased risk for flu-related complications, the researchers said. "Our research shows that influenza vaccination in children with [neurological disorders] is comparable to vaccination in healthy children – but both rates are suboptimal," study author Dr. Michael Smith, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at the University of Louisville, said in a university news release. "More education about the need for annual influenza vaccination is needed, both for parents and health care providers," he added. The researchers conducted a nationwide survey of more ... Read more

Related support groups: Seizures, Influenza, Epilepsy, Cerebral Palsy, Vaccination and Prophlaxis, Influenza Prophylaxis

SPARC Announces FDA Approval of Elepsia XR (levetiracetam) Extended-Release Tablets

Posted 4 Mar 2015 by Drugs.com

March 04, 2015, Mumbai: Sun Pharma Advanced Research Company Ltd. (SPARC) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved its New Drug Application (NDA) for Elepsia XR (Levetiracetam extended-release tablets 1000 mg and 1500 mg). Elepsia XR is indicated for adjunctive therapy in the treatment of partial onset seizures in patients 12 years of age and older with epilepsy. “Levetiracetam is a very successful and highly effective antiepileptic drug but more than 80% of epilepsy patients require Levetiracetam in does in range of 1000mg to 3000mg resulting in a significant pill burden. Approval of Elepsia XR as 1000mg and 1500mg once a day tablets will be very useful for these patients and physicians.” said Anil Raghavan, Chief Executive Officer of SPARC. The product will be manufactured by Sun Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd at its Halol (Gujarat) facility in Ind ... Read more

Related support groups: Seizures, Epilepsy, Levetiracetam

Epilepsy Surgery Gets High Marks From Patients in Survey

Posted 26 Feb 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 26, 2015 – More than nine in 10 epilepsy patients who had brain surgery to try to control their seizures are happy they did so, a new survey reveals. The review appears to be driven by the fact that patients saw the number of debilitating seizures they experienced after surgery either drop significantly or disappear altogether, the researchers noted. "One percent of the U.S. population has epilepsy, and among that group there are about 750,000 patients with recurring seizures that are not well-controlled," said study co-author Dr. Marianna Spanaki-Varelas, director of the Henry Ford Comprehensive Epilepsy Program at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. "Of those, 30 to 35 percent are [surgical] candidates because they do not respond to the roughly 15 appropriate epilepsy drugs that we have." A great majority of those who have surgery say it was worthwhile because many remain ... Read more

Related support groups: Seizures, Epilepsy, Seizure Prevention, Seizure Prophylaxis

Eisai Receives Approval for Antiepileptic Drug Banzel (rufinamide) As Adjunctive Treatment For Pediatric Patients

Posted 15 Feb 2015 by Drugs.com

Tokyo, Japan – February 16, 2015 – Eisai Co., Ltd. announced today that its U.S. subsidiary Eisai Inc. has received approval of an additional pediatric indication for Eisai’s antiepileptic drug (AED) Banzel (rufinamide) from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Through this approval, Banzel, which had been approved for the adjunctive treatment of seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) in children four years older and adults, is now additionally approved for the same indication in pediatric patients from one to less than four years of age in the United States. The additional indication approval is based on an interim analysis of a Phase III clinical trial (Study 303) in pediatric patients from one to less than four years of age comparing Banzel with other existing AEDs as add-on treatments. The study showed that the pharmacokinetic and safety profiles are c ... Read more

Related support groups: Seizures, Banzel, Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome, Rufinamide

Two Drugs Work Equally Well for Epileptic Seizures in Kids: Study

Posted 22 Apr 2014 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 22, 2014 – Researchers comparing two drugs used to treat epileptic seizures in children – lorazepam (Ativan) and diazepam (Valium) – found no difference between them in safety or effectiveness. Although previous studies gave the edge to Ativan, Dr. James Chamberlain, lead researcher for the new study, gave several reasons why Valium might be as good or better. "Unexpectedly, Ativan is not superior to Valium for treating pediatric seizures. It's been dogma in medicine that Ativan is better than Valium, but this study shows that they are just about equal," said Chamberlain, division chief of emergency medicine and trauma services at Children's National Medical Center in Washington, D.C. Since Valium does not have to be refrigerated, it might be a better choice for paramedics who treat seizure patients before they arrive at a hospital, he said. "They can start Valium ... Read more

Related support groups: Seizures, Ativan, Valium, Lorazepam, Epilepsy, Diazepam, Diastat, Valrelease, Lorazepam Intensol, Diastat AcuDial, Diazepam Intensol, Zetran, Diastat Pediatric, Dizac

Upsher-Smith Receives FDA Approval for Qudexy XR (topiramate) Extended-Release Capsules

Posted 13 Mar 2014 by Drugs.com

Maple Grove, MN – March 12, 2014 – Upsher-Smith Laboratories, Inc. (Upsher-Smith), today announced it received approval on March 11, 2014 from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Qudexy XR (topiramate) extended-release capsules, a once-daily, broad-spectrum antiepileptic drug specifically engineered to deliver a smooth pharmacokinetic (PK) profile. Qudexy XR is indicated as initial monotherapy in patients 10 years of age and older with partial-onset seizures (POS) or primary generalized tonic clonic seizures. It is also approved as adjunctive therapy in patients 2 years of age and older with POS, primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures and seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Qudexy XR will be available to patients in the second quarter of 2014. As many as two out of three patients treated for epilepsy have seizures that are refractory to therapy, either bec ... Read more

Related support groups: Seizures, Topiramate

Fever-Related Seizures in Kids Eased by Epilepsy Drug: Study

Posted 6 Feb 2014 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 6, 2014 – Early treatment with antiepileptic drugs reduces the length of fever-related seizures in children, according to a new study. Published Feb. 6 in the journal Epilepsia, the study also found that a standard emergency medical services treatment guideline for prolonged fever-related seizures is needed in the United States. Most fever-related seizures, also called febrile seizures, are brief, but up to 10 percent can last more than 30 minutes. These prolonged seizures can put children at risk for short- and long-term complications, including developing epilepsy, according to a journal news release. The new study included nearly 200 children, aged 1 month to 6 years, who had one seizure or a group of seizures that lasted more than 30 minutes. The researchers examined the connection between time to treatment and length of the seizure. About 90 percent of the children ... Read more

Related support groups: Seizures

Study Weighs Safety of Epilepsy Drugs in Pregnancy

Posted 8 Jan 2014 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 8, 2014 – There's long been concern that certain drugs taken to control seizures might be unsafe for use by pregnant women, due to potential effects on the fetus. Now, new British research suggests that the drug levetiracetam does not pose a major risk to the neurological development of the fetus, although there's more evidence that another drug – valproate – may cause some problems. "These results are heartening, as the use of levetiracetam has increased in recent years, but there has been limited information on its effect on the thinking, movement and language abilities of children," study author Rebekah Shallcross of the University of Liverpool said in a news release from the American Academy of Neurology. "This is the first study to look at the effects of levetiracetam, and further research is needed before we can be certain there are no associations," Shallcross ... Read more

Related support groups: Seizures, Epilepsy, Keppra, Levetiracetam, Keppra XR

FDA Approves Aptiom to Treat Seizures in Adults

Posted 10 Nov 2013 by Drugs.com

November 8, 2013 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Aptiom (eslicarbazepine acetate) as an add-on medication to treat seizures associated with epilepsy. Epilepsy is a brain disorder caused by abnormal or excessive activity in the brain’s nerve cells. Approximately 200,000 new cases of seizures and epilepsy occur in the United States each year. Aptiom is approved for the treatment of partial seizures, the most common type of seizure seen in people with epilepsy. Seizures can cause a wide range of symptoms, including repetitive limb movements, unusual behavior and generalized convulsions with loss of consciousness. Seizures can have serious consequences, including injury and death. “Some patients with epilepsy do not achieve satisfactory seizure control from existing treatments,” said Eric Bastings, M.D., acting director of the Division of Neurology Products in t ... Read more

Related support groups: Seizures, Epilepsy

FDA Medwatch Alert: Potiga (Ezogabine): Drug Safety Communication - Linked To Retinal Abnormalities And Blue Skin Discoloration

Posted 4 Nov 2013 by Drugs.com

UPDATED 11/01/2013:  FDA approved changes to the drug label, underscoring risks of abnormalities to the retina in the eye, potential vision loss, and skin discoloration, all of which may become permanent. The revised label includes a new boxed warning, because of the risk of abnormalities to the retina. FDA advises that Potiga use be limited to patients who have not responded adequately to several alternative therapies to decrease the frequency of seizures, or epilepsy, and for whom the benefits of treatment outweigh the risks. AUDIENCE: Health Professional, Neurology, Patient ISSUE: FDA is warning the public that the anti-seizure medication Potiga (Ezogabine) can cause blue skin discoloration and eye abnormalities characterized by pigment changes in the retina. FDA does not currently know if these changes are reversible. FDA is working with the manufacturer to gather and evaluate all ... Read more

Related support groups: Seizures, Epilepsy, Potiga

Epilepsy Drugs in Pregnancy May Affect Infants' Fine Motor Skills

Posted 25 Sep 2013 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 25 – Young children exposed to epilepsy drugs in the womb are at increased risk of having impaired fine motor skills, according to a new study. Exposure to the drugs in breast milk, however, does not appear to pose a threat. Researchers looked at data collected from Norwegian mothers about their children's language, behavior, and motor and social skills at the ages of 6 months, 18 months and 36 months. The women also provided information on breast-feeding during the first year for the study, which was published online Sept. 23 in the journal JAMA Neurology. Of the children in the study, 223 were exposed to one or more epilepsy drugs in the womb. At age 6 months, 11.5 percent of infants whose mothers took epilepsy drugs during pregnancy had impaired fine motor skills (which involve small muscle movements) compared with less than 5 percent of those who were not exposed ... Read more

Related support groups: Seizures, Klonopin, Lyrica, Clonazepam, Ativan, Lamictal, Valium, Topamax, Depakote, Lorazepam, Epilepsy, Diazepam, Keppra, Tegretol, Lamotrigine, Dilantin, Trileptal, Topiramate, Carbamazepine, Pregabalin

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