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Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation Blog

Blood Thinner Warfarin May Pose Greater Bleeding Risk for Obese: Study

Posted 16 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 8, 2015 – Obese patients taking the blood thinner warfarin appear to have almost twice the risk of severe stomach bleeding compared to their normal-weight counterparts, a new study suggests. Why obese patients may be at greater risk for stomach bleeding isn't clear, according to the study. But Dr. Richard Hayes, a cardiologist at Lenox Hill HealthPlex in New York City, said it isn't surprising that obese patients taking warfarin may have a higher risk for stomach bleeding. "Obese patients have more medical problems, such as high blood pressure and diabetes," he said. "Therefore, they are more likely to be on other medications, many of which interfere with warfarin." Hayes was not involved in the new research, but reviewed the study's findings. Warfarin is taken to prevent heart attacks and stroke. It is often prescribed for patients with atrial fibrillation – an abnormal ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Warfarin, Coumadin, Atrial Fibrillation, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Jantoven, Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage, Anisindione, Miradon, Upper GI Hemorrhage, Dicumarol

Device May Pose Dangers for Patients With Irregular Heartbeat: Study

Posted 4 May 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 4, 2015 – Heart surgeons are making regular and potentially dangerous "off-label" use of a suturing device in patients with abnormal heart rhythms, researchers report. Though the Lariat device can be used to tie off a part of the heart that raises stroke risk, it has not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for this specific purpose. And a small number of atrial fibrillation patients have needed lifesaving surgery or died following this off-label procedure, the study authors discovered. "We found a handful of deaths, and a greater handful in which there was the need for an urgent open-heart surgery to correct a problem" involving bleeding or damage done to the heart during the procedure, said lead researcher Dr. Jay Giri. He is an assistant professor of cardiovascular medicine with the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, in ... Read more

Related support groups: Atrial Fibrillation, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Cardiothoracic Surgery

Pharmacists Key to Whether Patients Take Blood Thinners

Posted 14 Apr 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 14, 2015 – Millions of older Americans are prescribed a blood thinner to help reduce the stroke risks associated with a dangerous irregular heart beat known as atrial fibrillation. A new study finds that even though a large percentage fail to take the potentially life-saving medications as prescribed, the intervention of their local pharmacist might help. In the study, a team led by Dr. Mintu Turakhia, an assistant professor of medicine at Stanford University, in Palo Alto, Calif., looked at the use of the blood thinner Pradaxa (dabigatran) by Veterans Administration outpatients who were prescribed the drug between 2010 and 2012. Pradaxa belongs to a new class of twice-daily oral blood thinners, and it is often prescribed for atrial fibrillation (nicknamed "a-fib"). "The new oral anticoagulants, such as dabigatran, represent the biggest medical change in the delivery of ... Read more

Related support groups: Warfarin, Coumadin, Atrial Fibrillation, Xarelto, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Eliquis, Rivaroxaban, Arixtra, Apixaban, Fondaparinux, Jantoven, Savaysa, Edoxaban, Arixtra 7.5 mg/dose, Dicumarol, Arixtra 5 mg/dose, Miradon, Anisindione, Arixtra 10 mg/dose

FDA Approves Savaysa (edoxaban) to Prevent Embolic Events in Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation

Posted 12 Jan 2015 by Drugs.com

January 8, 2015 – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the anti-clotting drug Savaysa (edoxaban tablets) to reduce the risk of stroke and dangerous blood clots (systemic embolism) in patients with atrial fibrillation that is not caused by a heart valve problem. Atrial fibrillation is one of the most common types of abnormal heart rhythm. It occurs when the heart’s two upper chambers (atria) do not contract properly, allowing blood clots to form, which can break off and travel to the brain or other parts of the body. Patients with atrial fibrillation experience an abnormal, irregular and rapid heartbeat. Savaysa also has been approved to treat deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) in patients who have already been treated with an anti-clotting drug administered by injection or infusion (parenterally), for five to ten days. DVT is a blood clot that f ... Read more

Related support groups: Atrial Fibrillation, Pulmonary Embolism, Deep Vein Thrombosis, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation

Blood-Thinning Drug Savaysa Approved

Posted 9 Jan 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 9, 2015 – The anti-clotting drug Savaysa (edoxaban) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to reduce the risk of stroke and prevent dangerous blood clots. The drug was approved for people with an irregular heartbeat known as atrial fibrillation that isn't caused by a heart valve problem, and for people with blood clots such as deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism. Such clots can break away and travel to the brain and other parts of the body, the FDA said in a news release. Clinical studies compared Savaysa to the anti-clotting drug warfarin. The newly-approved drug was found as effective as warfarin in preventing stroke-causing clots, but had significantly fewer cases of major bleeding episodes that can affect warfarin patients, the FDA said. Nonetheless, bleeding was recorded as a primary side effect of Savaysa, as was anemia. Savaysa's label ... Read more

Related support groups: Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation

FDA OKs New Anti-Clotting Drug for Heart Rhythm Disorder

Posted 9 Jan 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 9, 2015 – A new anti-clotting drug to reduce the risk of dangerous blood clots and strokes in people with a type of heart rhythm disorder has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Savaysa (edoxaban) is approved to treat people with atrial fibrillation that's not caused by a heart valve problem. Atrial fibrillation – the most common type of heart rhythm disorder – increases the risk of developing blood clots that can travel to the brain and cause a stroke. Savaysa pills are also approved to treat deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in people already treated with an injected or infused anti-clotting drug for five to 10 days, according to the FDA. Deep vein thrombosis is a blood clot that forms in a deep vein, usually in the lower leg or thigh. Pulmonary embolism is a potentially deadly condition that occurs when a deep vein blood clot breaks off ... Read more

Related support groups: Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation

Exercise, Diet May Be Key to Beating a Common Irregular Heartbeat

Posted 12 Dec 2014 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 12, 2014 – Atrial fibrillation is a potentially dangerous form of irregular heartbeat for older Americans. However, a new study suggests healthy changes in eating and exercise habits can help ease the condition. According to the Australian researchers, atrial fibrillation is the most common cause of irregular heartbeat, and it's been linked to a heightened risk for dementia, stroke and death. The new study included more than 149 people who had undergone a procedure called catheter ablation to treat the condition. In this procedure, the tissue surrounding the problem area in the heart is burned. In addition, 61 of the patients also took part in an aggressive "risk factor management" program after they underwent catheter ablation. The program was designed to reduce lifestyle risk factors such as being overweight, having high blood pressure, high cholesterol or high blood ... Read more

Related support groups: Atrial Fibrillation, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation

Could Too Much Medication for Irregular Heartbeat Raise Dementia Risk?

Posted 16 Nov 2014 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Nov. 16, 2014 – People with atrial fibrillation who are overtreated with anti-clotting drugs may be doubling their risk for dementia, a new study suggests. Atrial fibrillation causes the upper chambers of the heart to contract quickly and irregularly. These abnormal contractions allow blood to pool in the heart, forming clots that can cause a stroke if they break off and are carried into the brain. However, too much anti-clotting medication may raise the chances of tiny brain bleeds that, over time, might raise the risk of dementia, the researchers said. "In patients with atrial fibrillation, dementia risk is dependent on the efficacy and control of long-term use of anti-clotting drugs," said lead researcher Dr. Thomas Jared Bunch, director of electrophysiology at the Intermountain Heart Institute in Murray, Utah. Warfarin and Plavix, along with aspirin, are some of the most ... Read more

Related support groups: Warfarin, Coumadin, Plavix, Atrial Fibrillation, Dementia, Clopidogrel, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Jantoven

Heart Device May Cut Stroke Risk in Those With Irregular Heartbeat: Study

Posted 16 Nov 2014 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Nov. 16, 2014 – A new implanted heart device might be more effective than blood-thinning medications in reducing stroke risk for people suffering from the heart rhythm disorder known as atrial fibrillation, researchers report. The device called WATCHMAN proved better than the commonly used anti-clotting drug warfarin in preventing strokes, blood clots and deaths among atrial fibrillation patients, the study found. "These are important outcomes," said study author Dr. Vivek Reddy, a professor of cardiology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. "There are very few cardiovascular interventions that show reduced mortality, and this is one of them." The findings could lead to final federal approval for the device, which has been under review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for several years, Reddy said. An FDA advisory panel gave the device a ... Read more

Related support groups: Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation

FDA Medwatch Alert: Long-term Antiplatelet Therapy: Safety Announcement - Preliminary Trial Data Shows Benefits But a Higher Risk of Non-Cardiovascular Death

Posted 16 Nov 2014 by Drugs.com

[Posted 11/16/2014] ISSUE: FDA is evaluating preliminary data from a clinical trial showing that treatment for 30 months with dual antiplatelet blood-thinning therapy decreased the risk of heart attacks and clot formation in stents, but there was an increased overall risk of death compared to 12 months of treatment. The clinical trial compared 30 months versus 12 months of treatment with dual antiplatelet therapy consisting of aspirin plus either clopidogrel (Plavix) or prasugrel (Effient), following implantation of drug-eluting coronary stents. These stents are small, medicine-coated tubes inserted into narrowed arteries in the heart to keep them open and maintain blood flow to the heart. Clopidogrel and prasugrel are important medicines used to prevent heart attacks, strokes, and other clot-related diseases.  FDA believes the benefits of clopidogrel (Plavix) and prasugrel (Effient) ... Read more

Related support groups: Plavix, Clopidogrel, Effient, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Prasugrel

Irregular Heartbeat Doubles Risk for 'Silent Strokes,' Review Suggests

Posted 4 Nov 2014 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 4, 2014 – Atrial fibrillation, a common condition where the heart beats abnormally, may more than double the risk of "silent" strokes, a new review suggests. Silent strokes have no signs or symptoms, but can affect thinking and memory. In addition, recent research has shown that atrial fibrillation is associated with a 40 percent increased risk for mental impairment, the researchers noted. "Patients with atrial fibrillation are at higher risk of developing silent strokes," said review author Dr. Shadi Kalantarian, a resident at the Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, Conn. Previous studies have found that silent strokes are associated with a more than threefold increase in the risk for symptomatic stroke and a twofold increase in the risk for dementia, she said. "The higher prevalence of silent strokes in patients with atrial fibrillation may put this population at a ... Read more

Related support groups: Atrial Fibrillation, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation

FDA Medwatch Alert: Pradaxa (dabigatran): Drug Safety Communication - Lower Risk for Stroke and Death, but Higher Risk for GI Bleeding Compared to Warfarin

Posted 13 May 2014 by Drugs.com

ISSUE: The FDA recently completed a new study in Medicare patients comparing Pradaxa to warfarin, for risk of ischemic or clot-related stroke,  bleeding in the brain, major gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, myocardial infarction (MI), and death. The new study included information from more than 134,000 Medicare patients, 65 years or older, and found that among new users of blood-thinning drugs, Pradaxa was associated with a lower risk of clot-related strokes, bleeding in the brain, and death, than warfarin. The study also found an increased risk of major gastrointestinal bleeding with use of Pradaxa as compared to warfarin. The MI risk was similar for the two drugs. Importantly, the new study is based on a much larger and older patient population than those used in FDA’s earlier review of post-market data, and employed a more sophisticated analytical method to capture and analyze the ev ... Read more

Related support groups: Pradaxa, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Dabigatran

Doctors' Groups Issue New Guidelines on Treating Common Irregular Heartbeat

Posted 28 Mar 2014 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 28, 2014 – Reduced use of aspirin and the addition of three new blood thinners as treatment options are among the recommendations in updated guidelines to manage a heart rhythm disorder called atrial fibrillation, which is a major risk factor for stroke. According to the American Heart Association, atrial fibrillation involves rapid and disorganized electrical signals that cause the heart's two upper chambers – the atria – to contract rapidly and irregularly. Symptoms can include rapid and irregular heartbeat, heart palpitations, shortness of breath, dizziness, sweating, fatigue or chest pain. Atrial fibrillation is not a fatal condition, but it can increase a person's risk of stroke five-fold. That's because atrial fibrillation allows blood to pool in the atria and form clots, the AHA said. One study published in November at the AHA's annual meeting found that ... Read more

Related support groups: Aspirin, Warfarin, Coumadin, Atrial Fibrillation, Xarelto, Pradaxa, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Eliquis, Rivaroxaban, Ecotrin, Bayer Aspirin, Apixaban, Jantoven, Bufferin, Dabigatran, Aspergum, Buffered Aspirin, Low Dose ASA, Easprin, ZORprin

Warfarin Safe for Kidney Patients With Irregular Heartbeat: Study

Posted 4 Mar 2014 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 4, 2014 – People with chronic kidney disease who take the blood thinner warfarin to treat a form of irregular heartbeat are at no greater risk for stroke or death than similar patients who don't take the medicine, researchers report. The Swedish study involved more than 24,000 people diagnosed with heart disease and atrial fibrillation, a common and dangerous form of irregular heartbeat. In atrial fibrillation, blood pools in the heart's chambers, raising the risk for stroke. Researchers led by Juan Jesus Carrero of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm examined the link between treating atrial fibrillation with a blood thinner and patients' kidney function. The study, published in the March 5 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, found that taking warfarin was associated with a lower one-year risk of death, heart attack or stroke combined, without ... Read more

Related support groups: Warfarin, Coumadin, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Jantoven

Blood Thinners Now Recommended for People With Irregular Heartbeat

Posted 24 Feb 2014 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 24, 2014 – People with an irregular heartbeat should take blood thinners to reduce their risk of stroke, an updated American Academy of Neurology (AAN) guideline recommends. Taking these drugs is especially important for people with irregular heartbeat who have already had a stroke or mini-stroke, experts say. Irregular heartbeat (atrial fibrillation) is a major risk factor for stroke because it causes blood to remain in the heart's upper chambers, according to the AAN. The blood can then form clots that can escape the heart and travel to the brain and cause a stroke. About 5 percent of people with untreated atrial fibrillation are likely to suffer a stroke within the next year, the neurology group pointed out. Blood thinners (anticoagulants) are highly effective in preventing strokes, but may cause bleeding and should be used only under close medical supervision, ... Read more

Related support groups: Xarelto, Pradaxa, Prevention of Thromboembolism in Atrial Fibrillation, Eliquis, Rivaroxaban, Apixaban, Dabigatran

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