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For Pregnant Military Wives, Risks Rise if Partner Deployed

Posted 6 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 6, 2015 – War is tough on the soldiers sent to fight, but it also might have consequences for wives left behind, a new study suggests. Pregnant military wives are three times more likely to have a preterm birth or suffer postpartum depression if their spouses are deployed during the entire pregnancy, compared with those whose spouses are serving stateside, a new study reports. "The stress and the anxiety of not knowing whether your husband was alive during that period" can cause an increase in stress-related hormones in the body, and that stress may interfere with women's pregnancies, said Dr. Christopher Tarney, a U.S. Army captain and an obstetrician/gynecologist with Womack Army Medical Center at Fort Bragg, N.C. Women also might be stressed out because they are going through pregnancy without the support of their spouse, and often without other family or friends ... Read more

Related support groups: Postpartum Depression, Delivery, Premature Labor, Prematurity/Underweight in Infancy, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Health Tip: Protect Your Heart From Stress and Depression

Posted 28 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Your heart may pay a price when you're stressed or depressed. But there are things you can do to help lighten the burden. The American Heart Association recommends: Identify the source of your stress or depression, and find ways to cope with it. This may mean psychological therapy. Practice healthy habits, such as by taking a daily walk, but don't push yourself too hard, too fast. Devise a healthier meal plan. Don't reach for junk food when you get stressed. Make healthy lifestyle changes one at a time, rather than trying to change too much at once. Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety and Stress, Major Depressive Disorder, Postpartum Depression, Dysthymia, Seasonal Affective Disorder, Neurotic Depression, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Expert Panel Recommends Questionnaire to Help Spot Depression

Posted 27 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, July 27, 2015 – Part of your next visit to your family doctor's office should be spent filling out a questionnaire to assess whether you're suffering from depression, an influential panel of preventive medicine experts recommends. What's more, people concerned that they might be depressed could download an appropriate questionnaire online, fill it out ahead of time and hand it over to their doctor for evaluation, the panel added. In an updated recommendation released Monday, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force urged that family doctors regularly screen patients for depression, using standardized questionnaires that detect warning signs of the mental disorder. If a patient shows signs of depression, they would be referred to a specialist for a full-fledged diagnosis and treatment using medication, therapy or a combination of the two, according to the recommendation. These ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Lexapro, Zoloft, Cymbalta, Wellbutrin, Effexor, Prozac, Celexa, Paxil, Trazodone, Citalopram, Pristiq, Sertraline, Viibryd, Amitriptyline, Bupropion, Effexor XR, Fluoxetine, Major Depressive Disorder, Venlafaxine

Another Study Shows Link Between Antidepressants and Birth Defects

Posted 8 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 8, 2015 – New research provides more evidence of a possible link between antidepressant use early in pregnancy and a small increased risk of birth defects. But the study didn't prove that the medications cause birth defects, and experts aren't advising women to stop taking the drugs entirely. "Depression can be very serious, and women should not suddenly stop taking their medications. Women should talk to their health care providers about available options, ideally before planning a pregnancy," said study author Jennita Reefhuis. She is an epidemiologist with the U.S. National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Still,Reefhuis said, the study found that "some birth defects occur two to three times more frequently among babies born to mothers who took paroxetine [Paxil] and fluoxetine [Prozac] in ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Lexapro, Zoloft, Cymbalta, Wellbutrin, Effexor, Prozac, Celexa, Paxil, Trazodone, Citalopram, Pristiq, Sertraline, Viibryd, Amitriptyline, Bupropion, Effexor XR, Fluoxetine, Major Depressive Disorder, Venlafaxine

Scans Suggest Recurrent Depression May Take Toll on the Brain

Posted 30 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, June 30, 2015 – The area of the brain involved in forming new memories, known as the hippocampus, seems to shrink in people with recurring depression, a new study shows. Australian researchers say the findings highlight the need to spot and treat depression when it first develops, particularly among young people. Ian Hickie, who co-directs the Brain and Mind Research Institute at the University of Sydney, led the study. His team looked at the neurology of almost 9,000 people from the United States, Europe and Australia. To do so, they analyzed brain scans and medical data for about 1,700 people with major depression, and almost 7,200 people who didn't suffer from depression. The researchers noted that 65 percent of the participants with major depression had suffered recurring symptoms. The study, published June 30 in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, found that people with ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Lexapro, Zoloft, Cymbalta, Wellbutrin, Effexor, Prozac, Celexa, Paxil, Trazodone, Citalopram, Pristiq, Sertraline, Viibryd, Amitriptyline, Bupropion, Effexor XR, Fluoxetine, Major Depressive Disorder, Venlafaxine

New Moms Gain No Benefit From Eating Placenta, Studies Show

Posted 4 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, June 4, 2015 – While some celebrity moms swear by it and have made it trendy, doctors and scientists say consuming the placenta after birth offers women and their babies no benefit. In fact, the practice – known as placentophagy – may even pose unknown risks to mothers and infants, according to a team from Northwestern University in Chicago, who pored over the accumulated research on the issue. "Our sense is that women choosing placentophagy, who may otherwise be very careful about what they are putting into their bodies during pregnancy and nursing, are willing to ingest something without evidence of its benefits and, more importantly, of its potential risks to themselves and their nursing infants," study lead author and psychologist Cynthia Coyle said in a Northwestern news release. One expert agreed, saying the supposed benefits of placentophagy are vastly over-rated. ... Read more

Related support groups: Postpartum Depression, Delivery, Cesarean Section, Lactation Augmentation, Labor and Delivery including Augmentation

Depression Tied to Some Risk of Parkinson's Disease

Posted 20 May 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 20, 2015 – People with a history of depression seem to have a higher risk of developing Parkinson's disease, a large new study reports, adding to the growing body of research linking the two conditions. The Swedish study found that people diagnosed with depression were more than three times as likely as people without a history of the mood disorder to develop Parkinson's disease within the first year of depression. By 15 to 25 years later, those with depression were about 50 percent more likely to develop Parkinson's disease. "There's substantial evidence of an association with depression in the last years before a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease," said study author Peter Nordstrom, professor and chief physician in the department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation at Umea University in Sweden. But Parkinson's experts warned that the study does not prove a ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Major Depressive Disorder, Parkinson's Disease, Postpartum Depression, Dysthymia, Parkinsonian Tremor, Parkinsonism

Antidepressants Ease Postpartum Depression, Study Finds

Posted 19 May 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 19, 2015 – Antidepressants seem to help women deal with postpartum depression after childbirth, according to a new review. "Our findings are important due to the limited research exploring the use of antidepressants to treat postnatal depression," study first author Emma Molyneaux, of King's College London in England, said in a college news release. "We would urge that treatment decisions during the postnatal period consider the potential benefits as well as risks of medication, as well as the risks of untreated depression for both mother and baby," Molyneaux added. More than 10 percent of mothers develop depression during the first year after childbirth. For the study, the researchers reviewed six studies that included nearly 600 women with postpartum depression. The investigators focused their analysis on 72 women with postpartum depression from three of the studies. ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Lexapro, Zoloft, Prozac, Celexa, Paxil, Citalopram, Sertraline, Fluoxetine, Major Depressive Disorder, Escitalopram, Paroxetine, Luvox, Postpartum Depression, Dysthymia, Paxil CR, Fluvoxamine, Sarafem, Luvox CR, Brisdelle

Yoga May Help Ease Depression in Pregnant Women

Posted 19 Mar 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, March 19, 2015 – New research suggests that yoga may help ease depression in pregnant women. "This is really about trying to develop a wider range of options that suit women who are experiencing these kind of symptoms during pregnancy," lead author Cynthia Battle, an associate professor of psychiatry and human behavior at Brown University, said in a university news release. In the study, 34 pregnant women with depression attended yoga classes for 10 weeks. The women were also encouraged to do yoga at home. The yoga program did not include any type of counseling or other therapy to deal with depression. Only four of the women received outside treatment for depression, the study authors said. The women's levels of depression fell during the study, and the more yoga they did, the better their mental health, the researchers reported. There were also significant changes in the ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Postpartum Depression

Dad's Depression Affects Toddler's Behavior, Too

Posted 18 Mar 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 18, 2015 – Depression in fathers may be linked to anxiety and bad behavior in toddlers, a new study suggests. "Fathers' emotions affect their children," study author Sheehan Fisher, an instructor in psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, said in a university news release. Researchers looked at 200 couples with 3-year-olds and found that depression in either the mother or father during the first years of parenting increased a toddler's risk of anxiety, sadness, hitting and lying. Previous studies have focused mostly on mothers with depression during their children's early years. "New fathers should be screened and treated for postpartum depression, just as we do for mothers," added Fisher, who conducted the study while at the University of Iowa. Though the study only found an association between parents' ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Postpartum Depression

Postpartum Depression Often Linked to Long-Term Woes, Review Suggests

Posted 16 Jan 2014 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 16, 2014 – Up to half of women with postpartum depression – a mood disorder that can occur after childbirth – develop long-term depression, according to a new review. The findings show the need for doctors to closely monitor women with postpartum depression, said the researchers, from the University of Leuven, in Belgium. Parental depression can harm a child's long-term development, they said. The study also underscores the importance of ongoing support during early childhood and beyond, the researchers said. "Clinicians need to be aware of mothers' previous episodes of depression and possible contextual factors heightening vulnerability for a chronic course of depression," the researchers said in a news release from the Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The study was published in the journal's January issue. For the report, the authors examined studies on postpartum ... Read more

Related support groups: Postpartum Depression

Depression During Pregnancy May Raise Risk of Psychiatric Trouble in Kids

Posted 9 Oct 2013 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 9 – Teens are more likely to experience depression at age 18 if their mothers were depressed during pregnancy, a new study finds. The analysis of data from more than 4,500 parents and their teen children in the United Kingdom also found that the risk of depression was higher among the children of mothers with low levels of education who had depression after giving birth – postpartum depression. The study was published online Oct. 9 in the journal JAMA Psychiatry. "The findings have important implications for the nature and timing of interventions aimed at preventing depression in the offspring of depressed mothers," study author Rebecca Pearson, of the University of Bristol, said in a journal news release. "In particular, the findings suggest that treating depression in pregnancy, irrespective of background, may be most effective." Depression in the late teens is a ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Postpartum Depression

Postpartum Depression Risk May Rise for New Moms in Big Cities

Posted 6 Aug 2013 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 6 – New mothers who live in large cities are more likely to suffer postpartum depression than those in other areas, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed data from more than 6,400 women living in different parts of Canada and found that 7.5 percent of them said they had experienced postpartum depression, in the study published Aug. 6 in the CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). Women in large cities (500,00 or more people) had the greatest risk at 10 percent, compared with 7 percent for those in semi-rural areas (less than 30,000 people), 6 percent for those in rural areas (less than 1,000 people) and 5 percent for those in semi-urban areas (30,000 to 499,000 people), according to a journal news release. "The risk factors for postpartum depression [including history of depression, social support and immigration status] that were unequally distributed across ... Read more

Related support groups: Postpartum Depression

Genes May Boost Woman's Risk of Postpartum Depression

Posted 21 May 2013 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 21 – Pregnant women with specific alterations in two genes may be at increased risk of suffering depression after giving birth, a small new study suggests. The researchers hope they can use the findings to develop a blood test that could help spot pregnant women who are vulnerable to postpartum depression, which affects around 15 percent of new mothers. Their study, reported in the May 21 issue of the journal Molecular Psychiatry, uncovered specific chemical changes in two genes that predicted which women would develop postpartum depression with 85 percent accuracy. Little is known about the genes, called TTC9B and HP1BP3, but they are somehow involved in activity in the brain's hippocampus, which regulates mood. Based on animal research, both genes seem to be "reactive to estrogen," said Zachary Kaminsky, a researcher at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in ... Read more

Related support groups: Postpartum Depression

Anxiety May Be More Common Than Depression After Pregnancy

Posted 4 Mar 2013 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, March 4 – Anxiety is far more common in the days after childbirth than depression, with nearly one in five new mothers reporting acute mental stress surrounding delivery and the transition to a larger family, a new study suggests. Researchers also found that anxious new mothers were more likely to cut short breast-feeding efforts and seek out additional medical care for themselves within two weeks of delivery. "Postpartum depression has gotten a lot more attention than anxiety ... but it's anxiety that's an acute concern and affects so many aspects of the hospital stay and postpartum course," said study author Dr. Ian Paul, a professor of pediatrics and public health sciences at the Penn State College of Medicine, in Hershey, Penn. "Childbirth tends not to be a depressing situation for a majority of women, but it is anxiety-provoking, especially for first-time moms." The study ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Depression, Anxiety and Stress, Postpartum Depression

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