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Related terms: Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome, PTSD, PSTD

Why Americans Have Shorter Lifespans Than People in Similar Nations

Posted 2 days 18 hours ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 9, 2016 – Car crashes, shootings and drug overdoses, which cause more than 100,000 deaths a year in the United States, may explain why Americans' life expectancy is lower than in similar countries, a new study suggests. Americans' life expectancy is about two years shorter than residents of Austria, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom. For U.S. men, that difference translates into 76.4 years versus 78.6 years, while it means 81.2 years versus 83.4 years for women, the researchers reported. "About 50 percent of the gap for men and about 20 percent for women is due just to those three causes of injury," said lead researcher Andrew Fenelon. He is a senior service fellow at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. Although shootings, car crashes and ... Read more

Related support groups: Infections, Cancer, Major Depressive Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Head Injury, Spinal Cord Trauma

Study: Causes of Gulf War Illness Pinpointed

Posted 10 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 1, 2016 – Exposure to pesticides and other toxins appears to be the cause of Gulf War illness in U.S. veterans, a new analysis states. The Boston University researchers reviewed studies on Gulf War illness, and said their findings "clearly and consistently" show a link between the disorder and exposure to pesticides and taking pyridostigmine bromide (PB) pills, which were meant to protect troops against the effects of nerve gas. There's also evidence of a connection between Gulf War illness and exposure to the nerve gas agents sarin and cyclosarin, and to oil well fire emissions, according to the findings published in the January issue of the journal Cortex. These toxins damaged troops' nervous and immune systems, and reduced the amount of white and gray matter in veterans' brains, said study leader Roberta White in a news release from the university. White is a professor ... Read more

Related support groups: Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Mestinon, Pyridostigmine, Central Nervous System Disorders, Mestinon Timespan, Nerve Agent Pretreatment, Nerve Agent Poisoning, Regonol, Gulf War Syndrome

Wearable Electric Patch May Ease PTSD

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 28, 2016 – Can a small electrical patch that jolts the brain while patients sleep offer significant relief from the debilitating effects of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)? Iraq war veteran and PTSD patient Ron Ramirez thinks the answer is yes. In May 2006, machine gunner Ramirez was seriously injured when a roadside bomb exploded during a tour of duty. "About a year later they figured out that I had a brain injury," recalled the 38-year-old Gardena, Calif. resident. And like many veterans of war, that injury was further compounded by a diagnosis of PTSD, a condition typically triggered by exposure to traumatic or threatening situations that provoke extreme fear. PTSD brought on a significant shift in Ramirez' mood, thoughts and behavior, he said, resulting in a shattered quality of life. "I had no motivation," he said. "I had constant nightmares, and I couldn't ... Read more

Related support groups: Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Head Injury, Diagnosis and Investigation, Head Injury with Intracranial Hemorrhage, Head Injury w/ Intracranial Hemorrhage and Loss of Consciousness, Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness

Small Study Sees Differences in Brains of Soldiers With PTSD

Posted 20 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20, 2016 – New findings about how the brains of soldiers with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) respond to angry faces might help improve diagnosis of the condition, researchers report. PTSD can be difficult to diagnose because its symptoms vary considerably, the researchers explained. And many of those symptoms – such as memory loss and attention problems – are similar to those of a concussion. In the small study, the Canadian researchers said they found that over-connected brain circuits in soldiers with PTSD made them more attuned to angry faces than happy faces. The findings were published Jan. 20 in the journal Heliyon. "The heightened perception of anger in PTSD is driven by complicated brain circuitry where the mechanism of communication among a number of key regions that control fear and emotion is over-connected," said lead author Dr. Benjamin Dunkley, ... Read more

Related support groups: Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Diagnosis and Investigation, Head Imaging

Transcendental Meditation May Help Relieve PTSD

Posted 12 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 12, 2016 – Transcendental meditation may help ease post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in some soldiers and seems to reduce their need for medication, a new study finds. "Regular practice of transcendental meditation provides a habit of calming down and healing the brain," study lead author Vernon Barnes, a physiologist at the Georgia Prevention Institute at the Medical College of Georgia, said in a college news release. The study included 74 active-duty U.S. military personnel with PTSD or other type of anxiety disorder. Half of them did regular transcendental meditation in addition to regular psychotherapy, and half did not. After one month, nearly 84 percent of those in the meditation group had stopped, reduced or stabilized their use of drugs to treat their mental health conditions, while nearly 11 percent increased their use of the drugs. In the ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Panic Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Health Tip: Meditation May Help Your Heart

Posted 23 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Meditation can help mind and body relax, and the American Heart Association says it can help your ticker. The AHA says meditation may: Help ease stress. Improve your sleep. Help you focus on healthier activities. Supplement, but not replace, other heart-healthy behaviors, such as healthy diet and exercise. Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Panic Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Performance Anxiety

Study Maps Areas of Brain Linked to PTSD

Posted 18 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 18, 2015 – Heightened fear responses occur in certain areas of the brain in people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a new study reports. The research included 67 U.S. military veterans who served in Iraq or Afghanistan after Sept. 11, 2001. All had been involved in traumatic events, and 32 of the veterans had been diagnosed with PTSD. The veterans underwent a series of tests, and had MRI brain scans during those tests. The tests revealed that veterans with PTSD had heightened activity in certain brain regions when shown images only vaguely similar to the event that triggered their PTSD. For example, the researchers saw heightened activity in an area called the visual cortex. This is significant because along with visual processing, that area of the brain also assesses threats, study leader Dr. Rajendra Morey, associate professor in the department of psychiatry ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Panic Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Agitation, Psychiatric Disorders, Agitated State, Performance Anxiety, Diagnosis and Investigation

Brain's Signaling Systems Might Determine PTSD Severity: Study

Posted 10 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 10, 2015 – People with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) appear to have an imbalance between two of the brain's signaling systems, a new study suggests. The greater the imbalance between the two neurochemical systems – serotonin and substance P – the more severe the PTSD symptoms, the Swedish researchers reported. For the study, published recently in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, the researchers used PET scanners to measure the relationship between the two brain signaling systems. Previous research has shown that people with PTSD have changes in brain anatomy and function. And while some experts had suggested that PTSD might also involve a shift in the balance between brain signaling systems, the study authors believe this is the first study to actually show that. The findings improve understanding of PTSD and could lead to better treatments for the condition, ... Read more

Related support groups: Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Diagnosis and Investigation, Head Imaging

Health Tip: Talking to Kids About World Events

Posted 4 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Children will find out about the world's tragic events, so the information might as well come from you. The American Academy of Pediatrics offers these guidelines for talking to children about a world tragedy: Explain the event in basic detail, but don't include graphic images or descriptions. Provide enough information without being overly frightening. Make sure your child understands that it's okay to be concerned and upset, and offer support and comfort. Reassure children that officials are doing their jobs and taking care of people. Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Panic Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Trying to Make Sense of the Senseless Violence

Posted 3 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 3, 2015 – Mass shootings and the accompanying carnage have now become a regular part of life in America. And mental health experts warn that this steady drumbeat of violence could have major consequences for the nation's psyche. There have been 355 mass shootings in the United States so far this year – defined as incidents in which four or more victims were shot, though not necessarily killed, according to ShootingTracker.com, a crowd-sourced website that monitors U.S. gun violence. That amounts to more mass shootings than days passed this year, far more than any other nation on Earth. And most of these horrific episodes fail to make national headlines. For example, Wednesday's bloodbath in San Bernardino, Calif., that left 14 people dead and 21 wounded occurred just hours after a shooting in Savannah, Ga., in which four people were shot and one died. But the ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Health Tip: Are You Coping With Stress?

Posted 16 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

-- When you're stressed, it's important to handle it correctly so your health doesn't suffer. The American Heart Association asks these questions about how you manage stress: Do you eat, smoke or drink alcohol to help yourself cope? Do you eat and/or speak very quickly? Do you feel like you're always in a hurry, but are not accomplishing anything? Do you work too much and put off doing the things you must do? Do you have an erratic sleep schedule – sleeping too much, too little or both? Do you feel like you're always trying to get too much done at one time? If you answered "yes" to any of these questions, you may be too stressed and should find better ways to cope, the AHA says. Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Performance Anxiety

Military Deployment Tied to Greater Odds of Child Abuse, Neglect

Posted 12 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 12, 2015 – Young children of U.S. Army soldiers may have a higher risk of abuse or neglect during and just after a parent is deployed abroad, a new study finds. "The findings are not that surprising because a family experiences enormous stress when a soldier goes off on a deployment," said Dr. Bob Sege, a pediatrician specializing in child abuse and vice president of Health Resources in Action, in Boston. "The men and women who go off to fight for us are doing very admirable work, and it's not a surprise that it's stressful for their families," Sege said. Other kinds of stress, such as extreme poverty, partner abuse and postpartum depression, are already known to increase the risk of child abuse, said Sege, who wasn't involved in this research. "This study confirms the family stress theory of what causes child maltreatment," Sege said. "That's important because I think ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Social Anxiety Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Computer-Based Psychotherapy Not as Effective as Standard Care

Posted 12 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 12, 2015 – Computer-assisted cognitive behavioral therapy probably won't replace standard person-to-person therapy any time soon, new research suggests. The British study found that people did not follow through on computer-assisted therapy. Fewer than one in five completed six computer sessions, the researchers reported. Cognitive behavioral therapy – a form of talk therapy – is an effective treatment for depression. However, in-person therapy is not always available, so computer-assisted therapy was developed as a substitute. But until now, the effectiveness of computer-assisted therapy hadn't been studied. The study included almost 700 British patients with depression who were randomly assigned to receive either standard care from their doctor or standard care with one of two computer-assisted therapy packages – one a commercial product and the other a free online ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Bipolar Disorder, Panic Disorder, Anxiety and Stress, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Major Depressive Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Mania, Schizophrenia, Borderline Personality Disorder, Schizoaffective Disorder, Paranoid Disorder, Agitation, Psychosis, Psychiatric Disorders, Dysthymia, Seasonal Affective Disorder

Too Few Psychiatric Patients Screened for Diabetes: Study

Posted 11 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11, 2015 – Despite guidelines, diabetes screening rates are low among adults with severe mental illness who take antipsychotic medications, researchers find. In a new California study, fewer than one-third of mental health patients were screened for type 2 diabetes, despite an elevated risk for the disorder, the researchers reported in the Nov. 9 online edition of the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. Treatment with antipsychotic drugs contributes to this risk, the researchers explained. This class of drugs includes clozapine (Clozaril), olanzapine (Zyprexa) and risperidone (Risperdal), among others. Anyone taking them should undergo diabetes screening every year, the American Diabetes Association says. These drugs often cause weight gain, a contributing factor to type 2 diabetes, the study authors noted in a journal news release. "To improve care for persons with serious ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Bipolar Disorder, Panic Disorder, Diabetes, Type 2, Anxiety and Stress, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Major Depressive Disorder, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Social Anxiety Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Mania, Schizophrenia, Borderline Personality Disorder, Paranoid Disorder, Binge Eating Disorder, Agitation, Psychosis, Psychiatric Disorders

Online Psychotherapy May Help Some With Emotional Problems

Posted 3 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 3, 2015 – The Internet has made it possible for people to work and study from home, and new research suggests that a staple of mental health care may also be headed to a computer near you. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a mix of two disciplines that aims to help a person improve the way he or she thinks about problems and problem-solving, while also tackling unhealthy behaviors. For now, online versions of CBT remain rare in North America, with a few pilot programs underway in Toronto, Ohio and Kentucky, said researcher Dr. David Gratzer. He is a psychiatrist and physician-in-charge of mental health inpatient services at Scarborough Hospital in Toronto. "The long and the short of it," he said, "[is that] we love our iPhones here in North America, but we are failing to take advantage of technology for mental health services the way the Swedes and Australians have." ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Xanax, Anxiety and Stress, Lexapro, Zoloft, Cymbalta, Wellbutrin, Klonopin, Effexor, Prozac, Celexa, Clonazepam, Ativan, Valium, Paxil, Citalopram, Social Anxiety Disorder, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

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