Skip to Content

Join the 'Peripheral Arterial Disease' group to help and get support from people like you.

Peripheral Arterial Disease News

Related terms: Peripheral Artery Disease, Peripheral Vascular Disease

Whistle … and Walk … While You Work

Posted 8 Oct 2015 by

THURSDAY, Oct. 8, 2015 – If you have to sit almost all day while you work, take a short walk whenever you can. Why? Researchers report that even a 10-minute stroll can restore blood flow to legs affected by prolonged sitting. "Although the size of our sample was small, the effects and results we found were still profound," said study first author Robert Restaino, a doctoral student at the University of Missouri, in Columbia, Mo. The findings were published recently in the journal Experimental Physiology. "The obvious take-home is that uninterrupted sitting and inactivity leads to microvascular dysfunction, and therefore is unhealthy," said Dr. William Gray, director of endovascular services at New York-Presbyterian Hospital-Columbia University Medical Center, in New York City. Gray noted that sitting for a long time has previously been linked to heart disease. Restaino said the goal of ... Read more

Related support groups: Raynaud's Syndrome, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Peripheral Arterial Disease, Intermittent Claudication, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Peripheral Arteriography, Arterial Thrombosis

Medical Costs Soar for Smokers Who Develop Artery Disease

Posted 28 Sep 2015 by

MONDAY, Sept. 28, 2015 – Smoking significantly increases medical costs among people with peripheral artery disease (PAD), a new study suggests. PAD is a condition in which a buildup of plaque in the arteries restricts blood flow to the legs and feet. Researchers analyzed 2011 health insurance claims data from more than 22,000 PAD patients in Minnesota, and found that annual per-patient health care costs were $18,000 higher among smokers than among nonsmokers. The hospitalization rate was 49 percent among smokers, 35 percent higher than among nonsmokers, the findings showed. Smokers were more likely to be hospitalized for leg problems, heart attack and heart disease than nonsmokers, the University of Minnesota Medical School researchers found. Sue Duval, an associate professor of cardiology and biostatistics, led the project. The study was published online Sept. 28 in the Journal of the ... Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, Smoking Cessation, Peripheral Arterial Disease

1 in 6 Americans Too Far From Lifesaving Heart Centers

Posted 13 Jul 2015 by

MONDAY, July 13, 2015 – Tens of millions of rural, poor and Hispanic Americans do not have timely access to a lifesaving heart procedure, a new study finds. Researchers analyzed the driving times for 306 million people to reach the closest angioplasty centers across the continental United States. Angioplasty is used to open blocked heart arteries. A catheter is used to insert a deflated balloon into the artery. The balloon is then inflated to open the artery and restore blood flow to the heart. There are more than 1,700 angioplasty centers in the United States, the researchers said. The median time to an angioplasty center was 33 minutes, they found. However, the median travel time for more than 16 percent of the population – about 50 million people – was 81 minutes, according to the study. Results were published July 13 in the journal Health Services Research. It shouldn't take ... Read more

Related support groups: Coronary Artery Disease (CAD), Peripheral Arterial Disease, Acute Coronary Syndrome, Percutaneous Coronary Intervention, Acute Coronary Syndrome - Prophylaxis, High Risk Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty, Coronary Arteriography

At-Home Walks Help Those With Clogged Leg Arteries Stay Mobile

Posted 20 May 2015 by

WEDNESDAY, May 20, 2015 – Support groups that encourage walking exercises at home can improve the mobility of people with clogged leg arteries, a new study finds. Clogged leg arteries – called peripheral artery disease – can cause pain and fatigue while walking. This often limits mobility, which is crucial for independent living, doing daily tasks and socializing, the study authors explained. "Patients should understand that home-based exercise can help prevent mobility loss, and health care providers should recognize that this kind of exercise can be beneficial for their patients with peripheral artery disease," said study lead author Dr. Mary McDermott, a professor at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. Research has shown that supervised treadmill workouts improve walking ability among people with peripheral artery disease, but most insurers don't pay ... Read more

Related support groups: Raynaud's Syndrome, Peripheral Arterial Disease, Intermittent Claudication, Arterial Thrombosis, Peripheral Arteriography

Strengthening Hip Muscles May Ease Calf Pain From Blood Vessel Disease

Posted 7 May 2015 by

THURSDAY, May 7, 2015 – Exercises to strengthen the hips may ease calf pain for people with peripheral artery disease (PAD), a new study suggests. The disease causes the arteries in the legs and other parts of the body to narrow, restricting blood flow. This can lead to changes in skin color, sores, pain and trouble walking. Japanese researchers found that people with clogged leg arteries use their calf muscles more while walking since certain muscles in their hips are weaker. By strengthening their hip muscles, they may be able to walk longer without pain, the study showed. "PAD patients should ask for an expert, such as a physical therapist, to evaluate their gait and the strength of their hip flexors and other muscles. Based on the evaluation, a combination of muscle training and walking exercise may increase how far they can walk and reduce their calf pain during walking," study ... Read more

Related support groups: Muscle Pain, Raynaud's Syndrome, Peripheral Arterial Disease, Intermittent Claudication, Arterial Thrombosis

Leg Artery Procedure May Be Overused in Nursing Homes, Study Finds

Posted 6 Apr 2015 by

MONDAY, April 6, 2015 – Surgery to reopen blocked arteries in the legs of frail nursing home residents rarely gets them back on their feet, a new study shows. In fact, many elderly people who undergo the expensive procedure either lose more physical function or die within a year of the surgery, according to a review of Medicare claims data by researchers from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). However, that doesn't prove the surgery is unnecessary in all or even many cases, said senior study author Dr. Emily Finlayson, director of the UCSF Center for Surgery in Older Adults. Blocked blood vessels in a leg can cause extreme and chronic pain, or promote infections or gangrene that can lead to amputation. "This operation can actually make those symptoms better," Finlayson explained. "Even if that patient only has six to eight months to live, this may be an appropriate ... Read more

Related support groups: Peripheral Arterial Disease

Imaging Tests May Help Stem Amputations for Circulatory Disorder

Posted 4 Feb 2015 by

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4, 2015 – Patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) who face amputation of a foot or leg can have their limb saved by minimally invasive surgery to improve blood flow, a new study suggests. Among the patients tested and treated in a limb salvage program, amputation rates dropped nearly 80 percent, according to Dr. Julio Sanguily, a vascular surgeon with Martin Health System in Stuart, Fla., who led the study. "A multidisciplinary approach that includes vascular surgeons, with support from podiatry, infectious disease specialists and wound care, can significantly reduce the number of amputations," Sanguily said. The results of his trial were presented Tuesday at the International Symposium on Endovascular Therapy meeting in Hollywood, Fla. Research presented at medical meetings is considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal. According to ... Read more

Related support groups: Peripheral Arterial Disease

Drug-Coated Balloon Catheter Approved

Posted 13 Oct 2014 by

MONDAY, Oct. 13, 2014 – The first drug-coated balloon catheter designed to clear narrowed or blocked arteries in the thigh and knee has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The Lutonix 035 Drug Coated Balloon Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty Catheter has a balloon coated with the drug paclitaxel, which may help prevent re-narrowing of the affected artery after the clearing procedure, the FDA said. The device is approved to clear vessels clogged by Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD), which causes hardening and narrowing of the arteries and limits distribution of oxygen-rich blood. Symptoms may include leg pain, skin ulcers or gangrene. The device was evaluated in clinical studies involving more than 500 people. In one study after six months, about 72 percent of those treated with the Lutonix device did not require additional treatment for PAD, compared to nearly ... Read more

Related support groups: Peripheral Arterial Disease, Taxol, Paclitaxel, Onxol

Poor More Prone to Leg Circulation Trouble

Posted 14 Jul 2014 by

FRIDAY, July 11, 2014 – People with the lowest incomes may have a higher risk for a circulatory condition called peripheral artery disease (PAD), a new study suggests. People with PAD have narrowing of the arteries that supply blood to the limbs, most often the legs. The condition causes leg pain and is often an indicator of narrowing of the arteries throughout the body. People with PAD have a higher risk for heart disease and stroke. Researchers analyzed data from nearly 6,800 people with PAD who took part in the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 1999 to 2004. They found that those with low incomes were significantly more likely to have the disease. People with the lowest income levels were more than twice as likely to have PAD as those with the highest income and education levels, according to the study published online recently in the journal Circulation: ... Read more

Related support groups: Peripheral Arterial Disease

Could Dark Chocolate Help Ease Poor Leg Circulation?

Posted 3 Jul 2014 by

WEDNESDAY, July 2, 2014 – The antioxidants contained in dark chocolate might help people suffering from reduced blood flow to their legs, researchers from Italy report. In a small study, people with artery problems in their legs walked a little longer and farther right after eating a bar of dark chocolate, the researchers said. Dark chocolate is rich in antioxidants called polyphenols. The researchers believe polyphenols improve blood flow to the legs by affecting biochemicals that prompt arteries to widen. "Our body secretes chemicals that naturally dilate blood vessels in response to certain stimuli, improving the blood flow to certain areas," said Dr. Richard Chazal, vice president of the American College of Cardiology. "Some of the chemicals inside dark chocolate could affect the way these enzymes are metabolized in the body," suggested Chazal, who was not involved with the study. ... Read more

Related support groups: Peripheral Arterial Disease

Walking at Home Can Help Boost Poor Circulation in Legs, Study Shows

Posted 25 May 2014 by

WEDNESDAY, May 21, 2014 – A home-based walking program benefits people with poor blood circulation in their legs, a new study finds. The study included patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD), a narrowing of the arteries that can cause leg pain and hinder walking ability. Previous research found that supervised exercise programs can improve walking and reduce the symptoms of PAD, but this study is the first to examine the effects of a home-based workout regimen. There were 81 patients who took part in a program that trained and encouraged them to walk at home, and a control group of 87 patients who received only general health information. The participants in the home walking program were told to try to walk at least five days a week, building up to 50 minutes a day. If they experienced leg pain, they were to rest until their legs were comfortable again and then resume walking. ... Read more

Related support groups: Peripheral Arterial Disease

Dissolving 'Scaffolds' Could Help Treat Leg Artery Disease

Posted 22 Jan 2014 by

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 22, 2014 – Drug-coated "scaffolds" that are placed in the arteries and then melt away over time could offer a new treatment for people with painfully clogged leg arteries, an early study suggests. Researchers found that the experimental devices eased leg pain in 35 patients with peripheral artery disease. People with the condition have artery-clogging "plaques" impeding blood flow to the legs. Before treatment, 57 percent of the patients had severe pain when they walked; one month after treatment, none of them did. The findings, scheduled for presentation Wednesday at the International Symposium on Endovascular Therapy, in Miami, should be considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical journal. And experts cautioned that it's not clear how these devices compare with the current treatment for more severe cases of peripheral artery disease – namely, ... Read more

Related support groups: Peripheral Arterial Disease

Higher Spending on Poor Leg Circulation May Not Pay Off

Posted 21 Nov 2013 by

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 20, 2013 – Poor circulation in the legs, a condition called peripheral artery disease (PAD), affects many Americans and can become so serious it leads to amputation. But a new study finds wide hospital-to-hospital variance in spending on PAD, with no significant difference in amputation rates. "Medicare spending on patients with severe PAD varies more than twofold across the United States," wrote a team led by Dr. Philip Goodney of the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. In background information in the study, the researchers noted that in recent years, care aimed at preventing amputation has become increasingly costly due to the rising use of less-invasive "revascularizations" – treatments used to improve blood flow. According to Goodney's team, hospitals in regions that spent the most on PAD patients often ordered these lower-limb treatments in the year prior to an ... Read more

Related support groups: Peripheral Arterial Disease

Peripheral Artery Disease on the Rise Worldwide

Posted 1 Aug 2013 by

THURSDAY, Aug. 1 – The number of people with peripheral artery disease – a debilitating condition that can lead to heart attack and stroke – rose nearly 24 percent, from 164 million to 202 million worldwide, over the past decade. A new analysis from 2000 to 2010 found that although rates of peripheral artery disease are increasing in all parts of the world, 70 percent (140 million) of sufferers live in low- or middle-income countries, mainly in southeast Asia (54 million) and western Pacific regions (46 million). Peripheral artery disease is caused by plaque accumulation in arteries that carry blood to the limbs. The condition increases the risk of heart attack and stroke and severely limits walking ability. The analysis of published studies on peripheral artery disease also revealed that the number of people with the condition increased nearly 29 percent in low-income countries and ... Read more

Related support groups: Peripheral Arterial Disease

Home Treadmills May Help People With Poor Leg Circulation

Posted 2 Jul 2013 by

TUESDAY, July 2 – A home-based treadmill exercise program improved walking speed and endurance in people with poor circulation in the legs, a condition known as peripheral artery disease (PAD). That's the finding of a study that included nearly 200 PAD patients whose change in performance in a six-minute walk was measured over six months. Study patients who did the home-based treadmill exercise program increased their walking distance over six minutes by nearly 150 feet, compared with a decline of 36 feet among patients in a "control" group who did not do the exercise program. Participants in the exercise group also improved their maximum treadmill walking time by nearly a minute and a half, while the change in the control group was about 30 seconds, according to Dr. Mary McDermott, of the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, and colleagues. The investigators determined ... Read more

Related support groups: Peripheral Arterial Disease

Page 1 2 3 Next

Ask a Question

Further Information

Related Condition Support Groups

Raynaud's Syndrome, Intermittent Claudication, Erythromelalgia, Arterial Thrombosis, Thromboangiitis Obliterans, Peripheral Arteriography, Cardiovascular Conditions and Disorders

Related Drug Support Groups

Plavix, clopidogrel