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Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer News (Page 4)

Related terms: Cancer, Lung, Non-Small Cell, Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell, NSCLC

Older Lung Cancer Patients Less Likely to Be Treated

Posted 4 May 2012 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, May 4 – A study of seniors with non-small cell lung cancer found that older patients are less likely to receive treatment than younger patients, regardless of their overall health and prognosis. Non-small cell lung cancer is the most common type of lung cancer. For this study, U.S. researchers looked at data from more than 20,000 lung cancer patients aged 65 and older in the VA Central Cancer Registry between 2003 and 2008 and found that, for all stages of lung cancer, younger, sicker patients were more likely to receive treatment than otherwise healthy older patients. That may not be best for patients, the researchers said. Previous research has shown that older lung cancer patients who are otherwise healthy can benefit from treatment, while those with other illnesses are more vulnerable to the toxicity of cancer treatments. "It's clear that, as human beings and physicians, we ... Read more

Related support groups: Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Avastin No Benefit to Older Lung Cancer Patients: Study

Posted 17 Apr 2012 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 17 – Medicare patients who have advanced non-small cell lung cancer appear to get no survival benefit from adding the drug Avastin to standard chemotherapy, researchers from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute report. An earlier trial had found that Avastin (bevacizumab) did improve survival, but not in patients aged 65 and older. Even so, the researchers noted, most patients diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer are 65 and older and Medicare still covers the cost of the drug. "A drug that we were just ecstatic about in 2006, we have to be more circumspect about," said lead researcher Dr. Deborah Schrag, an oncologist at Dana Farber, in Boston. Avastin should be used judiciously, she added, noting that "older patients should discuss it with their doctors, but we cannot say it provides a survival advantage based on these data." However, Schrag does not think Medicare ... Read more

Related support groups: Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Avastin, Bevacizumab

Lung Cancer Screening Might Pay Off, Analysis Shows

Posted 9 Apr 2012 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 9 – Screening people at high risk for lung cancer could be at least as cost-effective as screening for breast, colorectal and cervical cancers, a new study suggests. A group of actuaries specializing in the health care industry estimated how much private insurance companies would pay and the survival benefits that would follow if they covered lung cancer screening. They based their study on using a scanning technology called low-dose spiral computed tomography (CT) on people between the ages of 50 and 64 who were at high risk for developing lung cancer due to their smoking history. The authors estimated that screening high-risk people would cost providers less than $19,000 for every year of life saved. The study was published in the April issue of Health Affairs. In comparison, the costs per life-year saved for breast, colorectal and cervical cancer screening – the three ... Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation, Computed Tomography

Early Study Finds Some Promise for Lung Cancer Vaccine

Posted 4 Apr 2012 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 4 – A new therapeutic vaccine appears to lengthen the lives of patients with a certain type of lung cancer, according to results of a small phase 2 trial. The drug, belagenpumatucel-L (Lucanix), extended the lives of patients with nonprogressive non-small cell lung cancer and increased the five-year survival rate among some patients with moderately advanced cancer to 50 percent, researchers found. For the study, 75 patients with stage 2, 3A, 3B or 4 cancer were randomly assigned to various doses of the vaccine, which was derived from four lung cancer cell lines. Staging refers to the severity of cancer. A stage 3 cancer has spread nearby, while a stage 4 cancer has spread to another organ. Overall, the patients survived an average of 14.5 months and the five-year survival rate was 20 percent, lead researcher Dr. Lyudmila Bazhenova, an associate clinical professor at ... Read more

Related support groups: Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Immune-Based Drug Combo Might Extend Cancer Survival

Posted 2 Apr 2012 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, April 2 – Cancer patients who receive a combination of low-dose interleukin-2 and retinoic acid after conventional therapy seem to live longer than those who don't get the combination. These new study findings, slated for presentation this week at the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research in Chicago, were seen across individuals with many different forms of advanced malignancies, including breast, lung and colon cancers. Retinoic acid is derived from vitamin A. Interleukin-2, a compound that fortifies the immune system, is approved at high doses to treat "metastatic" melanoma and kidney cancer. Metastatic means that a cancer has spread. The study showed that "these biological compounds may work at low doses. Bigger doses are not always better," said lead author Dr. Francesco Recchia, director of the oncology department at Civilian Hospital in Avezzano, ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Renal Cell Carcinoma, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Melanoma, Pancreatic Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Melanoma - Metastatic, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Gastric Cancer

Is Cancer Outwitting 'Personalized Medicine'?

Posted 7 Mar 2012 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 7 – The genetic makeup of cancer cells differs significantly from region to region within a single tumor, according to new research that raises questions about the true potential of personalized cancer medicine. With this treatment approach, doctors study a tumor's genetic makeup to determine which drugs would work best in a particular patient. But if the genetic mutations driving the cancer cells vary widely, a single tissue sample won't necessarily give the full picture. This "targeted therapy" involves "sticking a needle into the primary tumor site and taking a small sliver of a tumor, doing a gene analysis, and creating a genetic profile of the tumor to predict how the tumor will behave," explained Dr. Dan Longo, an oncologist and deputy editor at the New England Journal of Medicine. "What this paper tells us is that is an oversimplification of the complexity of ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Tarceva, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Herceptin, Erlotinib, Trastuzumab

Test Might Predict Risk of Lung Cancer's Return

Posted 26 Jan 2012 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 26 – A new industry-funded study suggests that a molecular test can provide insight into whether patients are at high risk of a relapse after surgical treatment for a form of lung cancer. The test, which is currently available, could help doctors decide whether the patients should undergo chemotherapy to prevent the cancer from returning. There are caveats: The test is expensive, and researchers don't yet know whether patients determined to be at high risk will live longer if they undergo chemotherapy. Still, "this may be one of the very first examples of where we understood enough about the molecular biology of a cancer to truly personalize the treatment of patients and actually improve the cure rate for that cancer," said study co-author Dr. Michael Mann, an associate professor of surgery at the University of California, San Francisco. At issue is non-small-cell lung ... Read more

Related support groups: Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Tests Might Someday Help Spot Early Lung Cancer

Posted 11 Jan 2012 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 11 – Lung cancer is the leading cancer killer in the world, and only about 15 percent of cases are diagnosed at an early stage, when it's most treatable. But two preliminary studies that are scheduled to be presented at a medical meeting this week suggest that scientists are moving closer to developing new screening tests that could potentially detect lung cancer in its earliest stages. In one report, researchers at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City evaluated tissue samples from healthy smokers and were able to identify precancerous changes in the cells lining the airways leading to the lungs. "We found that the earliest molecular changes related to lung cancer are present in the airway epithelium of healthy smokers who do not have any detectable microscopic abnormalities in the lung tissue," said study author Dr. Renat Shaykhiev, an assistant professor of ... Read more

Related support groups: Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation

Mixed News on Tough-to-Treat Lung Cancer

Posted 10 Jan 2012 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 10 – Dutch researchers report disappointing results from an early clinical trial of the drug Nexavar (sorafenib) in fighting a tough-to-treat form of lung cancer. But, in better news, an experimental drug known as ganetespib showed promise in laboratory and animal experiments. The results of both studies were to be presented Tuesday at an American Association for Cancer Research/International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer meeting in San Diego. In recent years, researchers have made some headway in finding treatments to combat lung cancer, which often doesn't respond well to chemotherapy, explained Dr. Len Lichtenfeld, deputy chief medical officer of the American Cancer Society. Those treatments include drugs such as crizotinib (Xalkori) and erlotinib (Tarceva), which are most effective in tumors that contain certain genetic mutations. However, those drugs tend ... Read more

Related support groups: Lung Cancer, Tarceva, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Nexavar, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Xalkori, Erlotinib, Sorafenib, Crizotinib

Anti-Estrogen Treatment Shrank Lung Tumors in Mice

Posted 9 Jan 2012 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 9 – Combination drug treatment that targets estrogen production significantly reduced the number of tobacco carcinogen-related lung tumors in mice, a new study shows. "Anti-estrogens have been shown to prevent breast cancer in some women," Jill Siegfried, a professor in the department of pharmacology and chemical biology at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, said in an American Association for Cancer Research news release. "If anti-estrogens can prevent lung cancer as well, this would be a major advance, because these drugs are safe to give for long periods and there are no approved ways to prevent lung cancer," she added. Most lung cancers have a type of estrogen receptor that makes tumors grow when they're exposed to estrogen. In addition, aromatase, an enzyme in the lung, produces estrogen. Siegfried and her team found that blocking this estrogen receptor ... Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, Arimidex, Femara, Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Anastrozole, Aromasin, Letrozole, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Exemestane, Faslodex, Fulvestrant, Teslac, Testolactone

Researchers Look at Genomes of Nonsmokers With Lung Cancer

Posted 9 Jan 2012 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 9 – Scientists who have started to identify genes and pathways associated with lung cancer in people who have never smoked say it's a first step in the potential development of new treatments. Never-smokers – people who've smoked fewer than 100 cigarettes over a lifetime – account for about 10 percent of lung cancer cases. But this group of lung cancer patients hasn't been studied as much as smokers who develop lung cancer, according to Timothy Whitsett, a senior postdoctoral fellow in the cancer and cell biology division at the Translational Genomics Research Institute in Phoenix. He and his colleagues conducted genetic analyses on three female patients with adenocarcinoma of the lung, a form of non-small cell lung cancer. One was a never-smoker with early-stage disease, one was a never-smoker with late-stage disease and one was a smoker with early-stage disease. "In ... Read more

Related support groups: Smoking, Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer

Targeted Drugs, Lung CT Screening Top Cancer Advances in 2011

Posted 6 Dec 2011 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 6 – As the war against cancer continues, a group representing U.S. oncologists has picked its "Top Five" list of advances in cancer care for 2011. Leading the list are approvals for a bevy of new, targeted drugs for tough-to-treat malignancies, plus promising results suggesting CT chest scans may be an early-detection screen for lung cancer. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) this week issued its annual report on progress against cancer. The report was published online Dec. 5 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. "The big news has been targeted drug therapy," noted Dr. Nicholas Vogelzang, head of the section of genitourinary cancer at the Nevada Cancer Institute in Las Vegas and co-executive editor of the report. "We now have drugs that are very selective for some solid tumors. We now have [new] drugs affecting melanoma and lung cancer, which is pretty ... Read more

Related support groups: Breast Cancer, Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Melanoma, Aromasin, Xalkori, Exemestane, Zelboraf, Vemurafenib, Yervoy, Ipilimumab, Crizotinib

Lung Cancer's Hidden Victims: Those Who Never Smoked

Posted 2 Dec 2011 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 2 – Opera legend Beverly Sills never smoked. Neither did actress and health advocate Dana Reeve, wife of the late actor Christopher Reeve. And yet in 2007 and 2006, respectively, both joined the ranks of about 32,000 Americans each year who never touch a cigarette but die of lung cancer anyway. In fact, experts say, one in every five cases of the leading cancer killer occurs in nonsmokers. The annual death toll among this group now approaches that of breast cancer (about 40,000 per year) and is roughly equal to that of prostate cancer (32,000). Many never-smoking women may also be unaware that they are more than twice as likely to die of lung cancer as they are of ovarian cancer (14,000 deaths per year). Numbers like those have experts calling for a shift in the public's thinking on lung cancer, away from its label of "the smoker's disease." "We say, 'If you have a lung, ... Read more

Related support groups: Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer

New Treatment May Boost Survival in Advanced Lung Cancer Cases

Posted 9 Nov 2011 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 9 – For the first time, "epigenetic" therapy has shown promise in patients with solid tumors, in this case non-small cell lung cancers. Of 45 patients in a trial of this experimental treatment, two had a complete response to therapy, one had a partial response and one is still alive more than four years after starting therapy. "It's not a home run, but this trial has opened the door for further research into epigenetic therapy," said Dr. Stephen Baylin, co-author of the study appearing online Nov. 9 and in the December issue of Cancer Discovery. Other experts were both hopeful and cautious. "The exciting part of this study is that they're using therapies that have really never worked in solid tumors, and this is one of the first studies to show that these types of therapies may work in solid tumors, and more specifically in lung cancer," said Dr. Benjamin Levy, director ... Read more

Related support groups: Lung Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

Experimental Vaccine Shows Promise for Lung Cancer: Study

Posted 24 Oct 2011 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 24 – New research suggests that physicians may be able to strengthen the power of chemotherapy in patients with the most common form of lung cancer by adding a cancer vaccine to the treatment. The combined treatment for non-small cell lung cancer was tested in a phase 2 study and still has to go through more research, as experimental drugs go through three phases of study. Although the rate of serious side effects was somewhat higher in those who received both treatments compared to chemotherapy alone, this new approach seems feasible, the study authors said. Commenting on the study, Srikumar Chellappan, chair of the department of tumor biology and scientific director of the National Functional Genomics Center at H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute in Tampa, Fla., said that the research is promising and the treatment could become a new strategy. Chellappan, ... Read more

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