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Eye Redness / Itching News

Laser Pointers Probably Won't Damage Pilots' Eyes …

Posted 11 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 20, 2016 – Lasers aimed at airplane cockpits likely won't damage pilots' eyes, but could lead to disaster by distracting them, eye experts warn. Reports of handheld lasers directed at aircraft are accelerating globally. Last year, more than 7,700 cases were reported to the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration, and the number seems to be soaring this year, according to published reports. "Obviously, if such a distraction occurs at a critical time, such as during landing, the result could be devastating," wrote John Marshall, from the Institute of Ophthalmology at University College London, and colleagues, in an editorial published April 20 in the British Journal of Ophthalmology. "Fortunately, these exposures are at irradiances that are incapable of producing irreversible retinal damage even at distances of [328 feet]," they wrote. There were more than 1,500 ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Eye Dryness/Redness, Eye Redness/Itching, Visual Defect/Disturbance, Color Vision Defect (Acquired)

Health Tip: Easing Eye Allergies

Posted 13 days ago by Drugs.com

-- When your eyes turn red, water and itch, it can make you miserable. The American Academy of Ophthalmology offers these suggestions for coping with eye allergies: Stay away from things that bother you, such as pollen, mold, dust and pets. Don't rub your eyes. Use over-the-counter artificial tears or an eye drop that contains an antihistamine. Take a decongestant medication. If it also contains an antihistamine, it could make you sleepy. Talk to your doctor about the possibility of getting allergy shots. Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Eye Conditions, Eye Dryness/Redness, Eye Redness/Itching, Conjunctivitis - Allergic, Seasonal Allergic Conjunctivitis

Contact Lenses May Disrupt Eyes' Natural Bacteria, Study Suggests

Posted 22 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 22, 2016 – Contact lenses may alter the natural bacterial environment of your eyes, new research suggests. A small study found that the eye surface of contact lens wearers tends to harbor bacteria normally found on the skin surrounding the eye. Whether this is caused by finger-to-lens interaction or the actual act of wearing contacts remains unclear. But the findings raise questions as to whether this shift in microbial composition might boost the risk for eye infections, the study authors said. "Wearing contact lenses is known to increase the risk of microbial keratitis and other inflammatory eye conditions," said study lead author Maria Dominguez-Bello. She is an associate professor with the Human Microbiome Program at New York University School of Medicine, in New York City. Keratitis is a painful and potentially serious inflammation of the cornea. More than 30 ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Eye Dryness/Redness, Eye Redness/Itching, Keratitis, Corneal Abrasion, Corneal Ulcer, Visual Defect/Disturbance

Health Tip: If Something's in Your Eye

Posted 21 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

-- If you have something in your eye, rubbing it could cause a scratch called a corneal abrasion. To get something out of your eye, the American Academy of Family Physicians suggests: Use clean water or saline solution to flush it out. Blink frequently, or gently pull the upper eyelid over the lower. Use a soft tissue or cotton swab to gently remove something that's on the white of your eye, but never do this when the object sits on the colored portion, called the cornea. Call your doctor at once if you can't get relief. Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Eye Dryness/Redness, Conjunctivitis, Conjunctivitis - Bacterial, Eye Redness/Itching, Corneal Abrasion, Conjunctivitis - Allergic, Seasonal Allergic Conjunctivitis

Don't Take Short Cuts With Contact Lens Care, FDA Warns

Posted 15 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 15, 2016 – If you use contact lens solution with hydrogen peroxide and don't follow the instructions carefully, you could be putting your eyes at risk, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns. Hydrogen peroxide contact lens solutions do not contain preservatives. While this makes them a good choice for people who are allergic or sensitive to preservatives, these solutions still pose risks. Before using a solution with hydrogen peroxide, read all instructions and warning labels, the FDA advises. "You should never put hydrogen peroxide directly into your eyes or on your contact lenses," Dr. Bernard Lepri, an optometrist in the FDA's Contact Lens and Retinal Devices Branch, said in an agency news release. Doing so can cause stinging, burning and damage to your cornea, the clear surface that covers the eye. When using a solution with hydrogen peroxide, it's crucial to ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Eye Dryness/Redness, Keratitis, Eye Redness/Itching, Corneal Abrasion, Corneal Ulcer

Health Tip: Soothing Pinkeye Discomfort

Posted 11 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Pinkeye is a highly contagious eye infection that's common in children. Experts say there are steps you can take at home to help those itchy eyes feel better. The American Academy of Ophthalmology suggests: For pinkeye that's triggered by an allergy, create a cool compress using a damp, wrung-out clean cloth. Be sure to use a different cloth for each eye to avoid spreading the infection. Apply a warm compress for pinkeye caused by a virus or bacteria. Use lubricating eye drops, which are available over the counter. See a doctor if symptoms don't improve. Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Eye Dryness/Redness, Conjunctivitis, Eye Redness/Itching, Conjunctivitis - Allergic, Seasonal Allergic Conjunctivitis

Health Tip: Protect Your Eyes From Fatigue

Posted 29 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Staring at a computer screen for hours can lead to pain and discomfort for your eyes. PennMedicine.com offers this advice: Adjust the room's light and the brightness of your computer screen to minimize glare. Place your computer screen about an arm's length in front of you, and at the level of your eyes. You don't want to have to turn your head to see the screen. If you need to read something while at your computer, place the material as close as possible to your screen. Use good posture, with knees bent at 90 degrees and feet flat on the floor, back straight and arms on the chair's armrests. Take breaks often to give your eyes a rest. Read more

Related support groups: Fatigue, Eye Conditions, Eye Dryness/Redness, Eye Redness/Itching

Health Tip: Putting Medicine in Your Eyes

Posted 16 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

-- You may be wary about applying those new eyedrops prescribed by your doctor. The Cleveland Clinic recommends: Use warm water and soap to wash your hands, then dry with a clean towel. Either grab a mirror or lie down before applying the medicine. Look up at the ceiling, then use one hand to pull down the lower eyelid. Hold the medicine in your other hand, resting on your forehead if needed. Without letting the tip of the bottle or tube touch the eye, gently place the medicine inside your lower eyelid. Then close your eye. If you are taking both an ointment and an eye drop, put the eye drop in first. Wait about five minutes before applying the ointment. Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Glaucoma, Eye Dryness/Redness, Glaucoma (Open Angle), Macular Degeneration, Conjunctivitis, Conjunctivitis - Bacterial, Blepharitis, Ocular Herpes Simplex, Keratitis, Eye Redness/Itching, Corneal Abrasion, Glaucoma/Intraocular Hypertension, Corneal Ulcer, Conjunctivitis - Allergic, Seasonal Allergic Conjunctivitis, Blepharoconjunctivitis, Glaucoma (Narrow Angle), Herpes Simplex Dendritic Keratitis, Keratoconjunctivitis

Health Tip: Protect Your Child's Eyes

Posted 27 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

T – Children can get eye injuries from everyday play or exposure to harmful objects. But parents can take steps to help prevent these injuries. The University of Michigan Health System suggests: Never let children throw things at each other. Establish a rule about never running while holding an object that is sharp, long or pointed. Store all cleaning products out of a child's reach. Store clothes hangers in the closet. Set a good example by wearing eye protection whenever needed. Schedule regular eye exams for your child. Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Eye Dryness/Redness, Conjunctivitis, Conjunctivitis - Bacterial, Eye Redness/Itching, Corneal Abrasion, Corneal Ulcer

Chickenpox, Shingles Vaccines Linked to Rare Eye Inflammation

Posted 25 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 25, 2016 – The vaccine for chickenpox and shingles has been linked to inflammation of the eye's cornea, but the number of such cases is small, a new study says. "Keratitis, or inflammation of the clear layer on the front of the eye, is a vision issue that can cause serious complications or even permanent damage to your vision if left untreated," Dr. Frederick Fraunfelder, chair of the ophthalmology department and director of the University of Missouri Eye Institute, said in a university news release. Researchers found 20 cases of keratitis in children and adults that occurred within a month of receiving a chickenpox or shingles vaccine. Symptoms of the disorder developed within 24 days of vaccination among adults. In children, symptoms began within 14 days of vaccination, the researchers said. The researchers said there is a probable relationship between the vaccine and ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Herpes Zoster, Zostavax, Varicella-Zoster, Keratitis, Eye Redness/Itching, Varicella Virus Vaccine, Corneal Ulcer, Corneal Abrasion, Herpes Zoster Iridocyclitis, Measles Virus Vaccine/Mumps Virus Vaccine/Rubella Virus Vaccine/Varicella Virus Vaccine, ProQuad, Vaccination and Prophlaxis, Zoster Vaccine Live, Visual Defect/Disturbance, Varicella-Zoster - Prophylaxis, Varivax

Falls, Fights Cause Most Serious Eye Injuries: Study

Posted 16 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 16, 2015 – Falls and fights are the leading causes of eye injuries that land people in the hospital, a new study finds. Also, the cost of treating such injuries is going up. The analysis of data from nearly 47,000 people hospitalized for eye injuries between 2002 and 2011 showed that treatment costs rose 62 percent during that time and is now more than $20,000 per injury. "While we have some clues, we still can't be certain why it's more expensive to get treated for an eye injury now than before," wrote lead researcher Dr. Christina Prescott, an ophthalmology professor at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. "It could be related to drug prices or administrative costs. Either way, it's clear we need more targeted interventions to help reduce these types of injuries, many of which are preventable," she added. Falls were the leading cause of eye injuries and accounted for ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Head Injury, Fracture, bone, Eye Redness/Itching, Visual Defect/Disturbance

Most Contact Lens Wearers Take Chances With Their Eyes: CDC

Posted 20 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 20, 2015 – Most contact lens wearers close their eyes to safety recommendations, a new U.S. government study finds. Nearly all of the 41 million Americans who use contact lenses admit they engage in at least one type of risky behavior that can lead to eye infections, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention researchers reported Thursday. And nearly one-third of contact lens wearers have sought medical care for potentially preventable problems such as painful or red eyes, they said. "Good vision contributes to overall well-being and independence for people of all ages, so it's important not to cut corners on healthy contact lens wear and care," Dr. Jennifer Cope, a medical epidemiologist at the CDC, said in an agency news release. "We are finding that many wearers are unclear about how to properly wear and care for contact lenses," Cope said. CDC researchers ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Eye Dryness/Redness, Conjunctivitis, Conjunctivitis - Bacterial, Blepharitis, Eye Redness/Itching, Corneal Abrasion, Corneal Ulcer, Visual Defect/Disturbance, Myopia

Be Careful With That Eyeliner

Posted 7 Apr 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 7, 2015 – Applying pencil eyeliner to the inner eyelid increases the risk that particles will get into the eye and cause vision problems, a new study warns. Volunteers first applied glitter eyeliner outside the lash line and then on the inner lid closer to the eye. Within five minutes, 15 percent to 30 percent more eyeliner particles moved into the eye's tear film – the thin coating protecting the eye – when eyeliner was applied to the inner eyelid, compared to outside the lash line. Particles also moved more quickly into the eye itself when eyeliner was applied inside the lash line, according to study leader Alison Ng, of the Center for Contact Lens Research at the University of Waterloo in Canada. Eyeliner particles in the tear film may cause discomfort for people with sensitive or dry eyes, and can also adhere to contact lenses and accumulate if used for more than ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Eye Redness/Itching

Protect Your Eyes When Hitting the Pool

Posted 29 Jul 2014 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, July 29, 2014 – Chlorine helps keep pool water clean, but it can also make swimmers more likely to develop eye infections, doctors say. Pool swimmers can also develop red, irritated eyes as well as blurry vision, said Dr. Sampson Davis, an emergency room physician at Meadowlands Hospital Medical Center in New Jersey. It's important to understand why this happens, Davis said. Swimming in chlorinated pools washes away the outer film layer of the eye that helps protect against infection. And chlorine might not completely rid the water of dirt and bacteria. As a result, swimmers may develop pink eye or other eye infections, Davis explained. Chlorine can irritate the cornea and cause the eyes to become dry. This can lead to blurry vision. Davis provided several tips to help swimmers prevent or ease these uncomfortable symptoms: To prevent eye issues while swimming, wear ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Redness/Itching

Health Tip: Help Control Eye Allergy Symptoms

Posted 22 Feb 2013 by Drugs.com

-- If your eyes are red, itchy and watery because of allergies, there are steps you can take to help ease your discomfort. The American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology offers this advice: When heading outside, wear a wide-brimmed hat to help prevent pollen from blowing into the eyes. Wear sunglasses when outdoors to help shield the eyes from allergens. After spending time outside, use eye drops to help rinse allergens from the eyes. Talk with your doctor about taking medication to help relieve symptoms. Read more

Related support groups: Eye Redness/Itching

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