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Eye Dryness / Redness News

Related terms: Dry Eye, Red Eye

Laser Pointers Probably Won't Damage Pilots' Eyes …

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 20, 2016 – Lasers aimed at airplane cockpits likely won't damage pilots' eyes, but could lead to disaster by distracting them, eye experts warn. Reports of handheld lasers directed at aircraft are accelerating globally. Last year, more than 7,700 cases were reported to the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration, and the number seems to be soaring this year, according to published reports. "Obviously, if such a distraction occurs at a critical time, such as during landing, the result could be devastating," wrote John Marshall, from the Institute of Ophthalmology at University College London, and colleagues, in an editorial published April 20 in the British Journal of Ophthalmology. "Fortunately, these exposures are at irradiances that are incapable of producing irreversible retinal damage even at distances of [328 feet]," they wrote. There were more than 1,500 ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Eye Dryness/Redness, Eye Redness/Itching, Visual Defect/Disturbance, Color Vision Defect (Acquired)

Health Tip: Easing Eye Allergies

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

-- When your eyes turn red, water and itch, it can make you miserable. The American Academy of Ophthalmology offers these suggestions for coping with eye allergies: Stay away from things that bother you, such as pollen, mold, dust and pets. Don't rub your eyes. Use over-the-counter artificial tears or an eye drop that contains an antihistamine. Take a decongestant medication. If it also contains an antihistamine, it could make you sleepy. Talk to your doctor about the possibility of getting allergy shots. Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Eye Conditions, Eye Dryness/Redness, Eye Redness/Itching, Conjunctivitis - Allergic, Seasonal Allergic Conjunctivitis

What Women Should Do to Guard Against Vision Loss

Posted 12 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, April 12, 2016 – Women are a majority of the 4.4 million Americans over age 40 who are visually impaired or blind, Prevent Blindness says. The national organization has declared April as Women's Eye Health and Safety Awareness Month, and has outlined several things women need to know about vision and eye health. The group said women are at greater risk than men for vision loss from such eye diseases as cataracts, glaucoma and macular degeneration, as well as a condition called dry eye, which is more common after menopause. Pregnancy can cause dry eyes, puffy eyelids and refractive changes that may show up as blurred or double vision. Pregnant women's vision may also be affected by migraine headaches, diabetes and high blood pressure, according to Prevent Blindness. The organization also warns that some glaucoma medications may harm a fetus, and advises pregnant women to ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Migraine, Hypertension, Eye Conditions, Hot Flashes, Menopausal Disorders, Glaucoma, Diabetes, Type 1, Eye Dryness/Redness, Cataract, Postmenopausal Symptoms, Pre-Diabetes, Diabetes Mellitus, Perimenopausal Symptoms, Visual Defect/Disturbance

Contact Lenses May Disrupt Eyes' Natural Bacteria, Study Suggests

Posted 22 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 22, 2016 – Contact lenses may alter the natural bacterial environment of your eyes, new research suggests. A small study found that the eye surface of contact lens wearers tends to harbor bacteria normally found on the skin surrounding the eye. Whether this is caused by finger-to-lens interaction or the actual act of wearing contacts remains unclear. But the findings raise questions as to whether this shift in microbial composition might boost the risk for eye infections, the study authors said. "Wearing contact lenses is known to increase the risk of microbial keratitis and other inflammatory eye conditions," said study lead author Maria Dominguez-Bello. She is an associate professor with the Human Microbiome Program at New York University School of Medicine, in New York City. Keratitis is a painful and potentially serious inflammation of the cornea. More than 30 ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Eye Dryness/Redness, Eye Redness/Itching, Keratitis, Corneal Ulcer, Corneal Abrasion, Visual Defect/Disturbance

Health Tip: If Something's in Your Eye

Posted 21 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

-- If you have something in your eye, rubbing it could cause a scratch called a corneal abrasion. To get something out of your eye, the American Academy of Family Physicians suggests: Use clean water or saline solution to flush it out. Blink frequently, or gently pull the upper eyelid over the lower. Use a soft tissue or cotton swab to gently remove something that's on the white of your eye, but never do this when the object sits on the colored portion, called the cornea. Call your doctor at once if you can't get relief. Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Eye Dryness/Redness, Conjunctivitis, Conjunctivitis - Bacterial, Eye Redness/Itching, Corneal Abrasion, Conjunctivitis - Allergic, Seasonal Allergic Conjunctivitis

Don't Take Short Cuts With Contact Lens Care, FDA Warns

Posted 15 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 15, 2016 – If you use contact lens solution with hydrogen peroxide and don't follow the instructions carefully, you could be putting your eyes at risk, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns. Hydrogen peroxide contact lens solutions do not contain preservatives. While this makes them a good choice for people who are allergic or sensitive to preservatives, these solutions still pose risks. Before using a solution with hydrogen peroxide, read all instructions and warning labels, the FDA advises. "You should never put hydrogen peroxide directly into your eyes or on your contact lenses," Dr. Bernard Lepri, an optometrist in the FDA's Contact Lens and Retinal Devices Branch, said in an agency news release. Doing so can cause stinging, burning and damage to your cornea, the clear surface that covers the eye. When using a solution with hydrogen peroxide, it's crucial to ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Eye Dryness/Redness, Keratitis, Eye Redness/Itching, Corneal Ulcer, Corneal Abrasion

Health Tip: Soothing Pinkeye Discomfort

Posted 11 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Pinkeye is a highly contagious eye infection that's common in children. Experts say there are steps you can take at home to help those itchy eyes feel better. The American Academy of Ophthalmology suggests: For pinkeye that's triggered by an allergy, create a cool compress using a damp, wrung-out clean cloth. Be sure to use a different cloth for each eye to avoid spreading the infection. Apply a warm compress for pinkeye caused by a virus or bacteria. Use lubricating eye drops, which are available over the counter. See a doctor if symptoms don't improve. Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Eye Dryness/Redness, Conjunctivitis, Eye Redness/Itching, Conjunctivitis - Allergic, Seasonal Allergic Conjunctivitis

Health Tip: Protect Your Eyes From Fatigue

Posted 29 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Staring at a computer screen for hours can lead to pain and discomfort for your eyes. PennMedicine.com offers this advice: Adjust the room's light and the brightness of your computer screen to minimize glare. Place your computer screen about an arm's length in front of you, and at the level of your eyes. You don't want to have to turn your head to see the screen. If you need to read something while at your computer, place the material as close as possible to your screen. Use good posture, with knees bent at 90 degrees and feet flat on the floor, back straight and arms on the chair's armrests. Take breaks often to give your eyes a rest. Read more

Related support groups: Fatigue, Eye Conditions, Eye Dryness/Redness, Eye Redness/Itching

Health Tip: Putting Medicine in Your Eyes

Posted 16 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

-- You may be wary about applying those new eyedrops prescribed by your doctor. The Cleveland Clinic recommends: Use warm water and soap to wash your hands, then dry with a clean towel. Either grab a mirror or lie down before applying the medicine. Look up at the ceiling, then use one hand to pull down the lower eyelid. Hold the medicine in your other hand, resting on your forehead if needed. Without letting the tip of the bottle or tube touch the eye, gently place the medicine inside your lower eyelid. Then close your eye. If you are taking both an ointment and an eye drop, put the eye drop in first. Wait about five minutes before applying the ointment. Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Glaucoma, Eye Dryness/Redness, Glaucoma (Open Angle), Macular Degeneration, Conjunctivitis, Conjunctivitis - Bacterial, Blepharitis, Ocular Herpes Simplex, Keratitis, Eye Redness/Itching, Glaucoma/Intraocular Hypertension, Corneal Ulcer, Corneal Abrasion, Conjunctivitis - Allergic, Seasonal Allergic Conjunctivitis, Glaucoma (Narrow Angle), Herpes Simplex Dendritic Keratitis, Blepharoconjunctivitis, Glaucoma with Pupillary Block

Health Tip: Protect Your Child's Eyes

Posted 27 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

T – Children can get eye injuries from everyday play or exposure to harmful objects. But parents can take steps to help prevent these injuries. The University of Michigan Health System suggests: Never let children throw things at each other. Establish a rule about never running while holding an object that is sharp, long or pointed. Store all cleaning products out of a child's reach. Store clothes hangers in the closet. Set a good example by wearing eye protection whenever needed. Schedule regular eye exams for your child. Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Eye Dryness/Redness, Conjunctivitis, Conjunctivitis - Bacterial, Eye Redness/Itching, Corneal Ulcer, Corneal Abrasion

Most Contact Lens Wearers Take Chances With Their Eyes: CDC

Posted 20 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Aug. 20, 2015 – Most contact lens wearers close their eyes to safety recommendations, a new U.S. government study finds. Nearly all of the 41 million Americans who use contact lenses admit they engage in at least one type of risky behavior that can lead to eye infections, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention researchers reported Thursday. And nearly one-third of contact lens wearers have sought medical care for potentially preventable problems such as painful or red eyes, they said. "Good vision contributes to overall well-being and independence for people of all ages, so it's important not to cut corners on healthy contact lens wear and care," Dr. Jennifer Cope, a medical epidemiologist at the CDC, said in an agency news release. "We are finding that many wearers are unclear about how to properly wear and care for contact lenses," Cope said. CDC researchers ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Conditions, Eye Dryness/Redness, Conjunctivitis, Conjunctivitis - Bacterial, Blepharitis, Eye Redness/Itching, Corneal Ulcer, Corneal Abrasion, Visual Defect/Disturbance, Myopia

Surge in Pollen May Spur Many Cases of Dry Eye

Posted 29 Apr 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 29, 2015 – High pollen levels in the spring are linked to dry eye, a new study suggests. "Finding this correlation between dry eye and different seasons is one step toward helping physicians and patients treat the symptoms of dry eye even more effectively based on the time of year," said lead researcher Dr. Anat Galor, an associate professor of clinical ophthalmology at the University of Miami. Dry eye causes burning, irritation and blurred vision. It costs the U.S. health system nearly $4 billion a year, Galor's team said in background information with the study. The researchers analyzed 3.4 million visits to Veterans Affairs eye clinics nationwide between 2006 and 2011. During that time, nearly 607,000 cases of dry eye were diagnosed. April had the highest rate of patients diagnosed with dry eye, nearly 21 percent. April is also when pollen levels usually peak each ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Zyrtec, Hydroxyzine, Claritin, Promethazine, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Eye Dryness/Redness, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Atarax, Cyproheptadine, Fexofenadine, Periactin

Air Pollution Linked to Dry Eye Syndrome in Study

Posted 19 Nov 2013 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Nov. 19, 2013 – Residents of American cities with high levels of air pollution are much more likely to develop dry eye syndrome than people who live in cities with cleaner air, a new study shows. People living in and around cities such as Chicago and New York City were three to four times more likely to be diagnosed with dry eye syndrome than those in urban areas with lower levels of air pollution. Dry eye syndrome – a deficiency in tear production – can severely hamper someone's quality of life and productivity. The condition affects up to 4 million Americans aged 50 and older. Its symptoms include excessive tearing, discomfort wearing contact lenses, and stinging and burning in the eyes. In this new study, researchers analyzed the medical records of more than 600,000 U.S. veterans who were treated for dry eye syndrome in nearly 400 VA eye clinics between July 2006 and July ... Read more

Related support groups: Eye Dryness/Redness

Health Tip: Possible Causes of Dry Eye

Posted 21 May 2013 by Drugs.com

-- You produce tears to help keep your eyes moist and protected from irritants. But dry eye can make your eyes vulnerable and uncomfortable. The National Eye Institute says possible causes of dry eye include: Certain medications, including birth control pills, antidepressants, antihistamines and blood pressure drugs. Diseases of the eye or nearby skin. Damage to the eye, such as from chemical exposure. Health conditions, such as thyroid problems, allergies or immune disorders. Irritation caused by use of contact lenses, or after LASIK surgery. Pregnancy, hormone replacement therapy or some homeopathic remedies. Not blinking frequently enough during use of a computer screen. Read more

Related support groups: Plan B, Mirena, Sprintec, NuvaRing, Implanon, Provera, Nexplanon, Depo-Provera, Ortho Tri-Cyclen, Tri-Sprintec, Yasmin, Microgestin Fe 1/20, Loestrin 24 Fe, Ortho Evra, TriNessa, Lutera, Mononessa, Benadryl, Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo, Zyrtec

Health Tip: Managing Dry Eyes

Posted 8 Feb 2013 by Drugs.com

-- Dry eye occurs when you don't produce enough tears to keep the eyes lubricated. The problem can cause discomfort and affect vision. The American Optometric Association suggests how to help manage dry eyes: Blink frequently while staring at a computer or TV screen. Run a humidifier. Wear sunglasses (the wraparound kind are best). Talk with a medical professional about whether supplements with fatty acids may help. Drink at least 8 glasses of water per day. Read more

Related support groups: Eye Dryness/Redness

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