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Dementia News

Related terms: Chronic Brain Syndrome, DLB

U.S. Dementia Rates Seem to Be Falling, Study Finds

Posted 1 day ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 10, 2016 – U.S. seniors may be developing dementia less often and at later stages of life, a decades-long study suggests. More than 5,000 people followed for almost 40 years starting in the mid-1970s experienced an average 20 percent reduction in their risk of developing dementia, the researchers said. At the same time, the average age at which the participants fell prey to dementia rose, from about 80 in the late 1970s to age 85 in more recent years, added study author Dr. Sudha Seshadri. She is a professor of neurology at Boston University's Alzheimer's Disease Center. Despite these findings, the United States still faces a dementia crisis with the aging of the baby boom generation, Seshadri noted. As many as 5.2 million Americans 65 and older are estimated to have Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of dementia. And these numbers are expected to rise with the ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Diagnosis and Investigation, Lewy Body Dementia, Arteriosclerotic Dementia w/ Depressive Features

Anxiety Meds Like Valium, Xanax Won't Raise Seniors' Dementia Risk: Study

Posted 8 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 3, 2016 – Taking one of a class of anti-anxiety pills that includes Ativan, Valium or Xanax does not increase older adults' risk of dementia, a new study finds. However, experts note that these drugs – collectively called benzodiazepines – can have other side effects and should still be used with caution. As the study authors explained, some prior research has suggested that use of the medicines may be associated with increased risk of dementia. However, other findings have contradicted that finding. To look further into the issue, a team led by Shelly Gray, a professor of pharmacy at the University of Washington in Seattle, studied more than 3,400 people aged 65 and older. All did not have dementia at the beginning of the study. The benzodiazepine use of each patient was assessed, and each was then followed for an average of seven years. During that time, 23 percent ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Xanax, Anxiety and Stress, Klonopin, Clonazepam, Ativan, Valium, Lorazepam, Alprazolam, Social Anxiety Disorder, Diazepam, Dementia, Temazepam, Alzheimer's Disease, Restoril, Librium, Xanax XR, Oxazepam, Halcion

Seafood Might Protect Brain in People at Genetic Risk for Alzheimer's

Posted 9 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 2, 2016 – Seafood lovers, a new study delivers good news on two fronts: Mercury found in fish doesn't lead to mental decline, and for certain people, a diet rich in fish might stave off Alzheimer's disease. Researchers who examined human brains confirmed that people who eat more seafood have more mercury in their brains. But, they found no link between higher brain levels of that neurotoxin and the kind of brain damage that is typical of Alzheimer's disease and dementia. "Everybody's saying seafood has so many health benefits, but everybody's afraid of the mercury," said lead study author Martha Clare Morris, professor of nutritional epidemiology at Rush University in Chicago. "We saw absolutely no evidence that higher levels of mercury in the brain were associated with any of the neuropathologies associated with dementia," she said. The researchers also found that eating ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Fish Oil, Lovaza, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation and Deficiency, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Omega-3, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Omacor, MaxEPA, Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids, Animi-3, Marine Lipid Concentrate, Restora, Sea-Omega 70, Vascazen, Ovega-3 Vegetarian, TheraTears Nutrition, Epanova, Divista

Weight Loss Starting at Midlife Tied to Later Dementia Risk in Study

Posted 10 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 1, 2016 – Declining weight from middle-age years to late life may be a sign of impending dementia, a new Mayo Clinic study suggests. People who lose weight over decades appear to have an increased risk for losing memory and thinking skills – called mild cognitive impairment – which can lead to dementia, including Alzheimer's disease. A loss of 11 pounds every 10 years may indicate as much as a 24 percent higher risk for loss of mental ability, researchers found. "Unintended weight loss may be a signal to examine whether to increase efforts to engage in lifestyle measures that are beneficial to mental function," said lead researcher Dr. Rosebud Roberts, a professor of epidemiology and neurology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. About 5 percent to 15 percent of adults who show early loss of mental ability progress to dementia, Roberts said. For the study, Roberts and ... Read more

Related support groups: Weight Loss, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Cachexia, Lewy Body Dementia

Too Few Older Adults Tell Doctors About Memory Loss: Study

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 28, 2016 – Do you worry that forgetting names, or where you put your keys, might be a sign of impending dementia? If you're like most older Americans, you don't bring this up with your doctor, a new study shows. Researchers who looked at federal government data on more than 10,000 people found that in 2011, only 1 in 4 adults aged 45 or older discussed memory problems with a health care professional during a routine checkup. In fact, the likelihood that a person would admit to a memory problem in a doctor's office visit actually declined with advancing age, says a team led by Mary Adams, of On Target Health Data in West Suffield, Conn. The findings were published Jan. 28 in the journal Preventing Chronic Disease. "Routine checkups are a missed opportunity for assessing and discussing memory problems for the majority of older adults," Adams said in a journal news release. ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia

Brain Protein Might Offer New Clues to Alzheimer's Treatment

Posted 15 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27, 2016 – A protein in the brain may hold a key to slowing progression of Alzheimer's disease, a new study suggests. And boosting this protein might be as simple as increasing exercise and social activity, experts say. The protein is encoded by a gene called brain-derived neurotrophic factor, or BDNF. Researchers found that seniors with the highest levels of BDNF gene function had a 50 percent slower loss of memory and thinking than those with the lowest levels. "What is cool about this study is that we have shown that BDNF, which is involved in brain cell survival, may protect against dementia," said lead researcher Dr. Aron Buchman. He is a professor in the department of neurological sciences at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. BDNF was protective despite the brain having plaques and tangles, hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease, Buchman said. "If you have high ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Diagnosis and Investigation

Computer-Based Test Aims to Predict Dementia Risk

Posted 21 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Jan. 21, 2016 – A new computer-based test might be able to predict a person's risk for dementia, just by analyzing the information family doctors gather during routine visits, a new study from Britain suggests. Researchers from University College London have developed an algorithm that uses medical data to predict a five-year risk of dementia, according to a report Jan. 21 in the journal BioMed Central. The algorithm assesses factors like age, sex, social interaction, smoking, body-mass index, alcohol use, high blood pressure, diabetes, stroke, irregular heartbeat (atrial fibrillation), aspirin use and depression, the study authors said. "We chose the particular factors as other research has shown in some people that they [risk factors] can be linked to an increased risk of dementia," said Kate Walters, director of the Centre for Ageing and Population Studies at University ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Diabetes, Type 2, Hypertension, Smoking, Atrial Fibrillation, Dementia, Smoking Cessation, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Diagnosis and Investigation, Hypertensive Heart Disease, Lewy Body Dementia, Arteriosclerotic Dementia w/ Depressive Features

Anesthesia After 40 Not Linked to Mental Decline Later, Study Finds

Posted 21 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 20, 2016 – Receiving general anesthesia for surgery after age 40 doesn't appear to raise the risk for mild thinking and memory problems later in life, a new study finds. Mayo Clinic researchers followed more than 1,700 people in Minnesota, aged 70 to 89, who had normal mental function when the study began in 2004. About 85 percent of the participants had at least one surgery requiring general anesthesia after age 40. The study participants were evaluated every 15 months. "The bottom line of our study is that we did not find an association between exposure to anesthesia for surgery and the development of mild cognitive [mental] impairment in these patients," study senior author and anesthesiologist Dr. David Warner said in a Mayo news release. Of the participants, 31 percent developed mild thinking and memory problems during the study period, but it was not associated ... Read more

Related support groups: Surgery, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Diagnosis and Investigation, Lewy Body Dementia

Dementia Drug May Lower Risk of Falls Among Parkinson's Patients

Posted 13 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 12, 2016 – A widely used dementia drug shows potential in reducing the risk of falls among Parkinson's patients, new research suggests. "With the degeneration of dopamine-producing nerve cells, people with Parkinson's often have issues with unsteadiness when walking. As part of the condition, they also have lower levels of acetylcholine, a chemical which helps us to concentrate – making it extremely difficult to pay attention to walking," said study lead author Emily Henderson, from the University of Bristol in England. The study included 130 people with Parkinson's disease who had fallen in the past year. Half took the drug rivastigmine (Exelon), while the other half took a placebo. After eight months, those who took the rivastigmine capsules were much steadier when walking and 45 percent less likely to fall than those who took the placebo, according to the researchers. ... Read more

Related support groups: Parkinson's Disease, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Exelon, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Rivastigmine, Parkinsonian Tremor, Parkinsonism, Prevention of Falls, Lewy Body Dementia, Arteriosclerotic Dementia w/ Depressive Features

Type 2 Diabetes May Raise Dementia Risk, Especially in Women: Study

Posted 17 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 17, 2015 – Women with type 2 diabetes may be at risk of developing a type of dementia resulting from damaged or blocked blood vessels to the brain, a new research review suggests. Analyzing data from nearly 2.5 million participants in 14 studies, an international team of scientists found that women with type 2 diabetes may have a nearly 20 percent higher risk of developing vascular dementia than men with diabetes. Vascular dementia is characterized by memory, thinking and language difficulties due to reduced blood flow to the brain, according to the Alzheimer's Association. But the risk for any form of dementia was the same for both sexes – about 60 percent higher for diabetics than for people without the disease, according to the research, published online Dec. 17 in the journal Diabetes Care. "It's plausible that the same mechanisms that drive the greater excess risk ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Dementia

Seniors Who Head Back to School May Reduce Dementia Risk

Posted 11 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Dec. 11, 2015 – Going back to school could help older people stave off dementia, a new study suggests. Taking college courses may boost brain functions, such as memory, decision-making and planning, the researchers said. The Australian investigators pointed out that their findings add to a growing body of evidence that healthy lifestyle choices – such as exercise, brain games and an active social life – may help slow age-related cognitive decline. "The study findings are exciting because they demonstrate that it's never too late to take action to maximize the cognitive capacity of your brain," lead researcher Megan Lenehan from the University of Tasmania in Australia, said in a news release from the American Psychological Association. "We plan to follow these participants as they age to see if college studies could help delay the onset or reduce the debilitating effects of ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia, Arteriosclerotic Dementia w/ Depressive Features

Playing Contact Sports in Youth May Raise Risk for Degenerative Brain Disease

Posted 3 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 3, 2015 – National Football League football players may not be the only ones who can develop a degenerative brain disease linked to repeated concussions during decades of play, a new study suggests. Even men who only played an amateur contact sport during their youth may face an increased risk for chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a devastating brain condition that can affect thinking, memory, behavior and mood, Mayo Clinic researchers report. To come to this conclusion, the researchers analyzed the brains of 66 men who had donated their organs to the Mayo Clinic Brain Bank and participated in sports such as football, rugby, wrestling, boxing and basketball while in school. Their brains were compared to the brains of 198 people, including 66 women, who never played contact sports. CTE was found in the brains of a third of the men who played amateur contact sports. ... Read more

Related support groups: Headache, Migraine, Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Cluster Headaches, Head Injury, Mild Cognitive Impairment, New Daily Persistent Headache, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Head Injury with Intracranial Hemorrhage, Head Injury w/ Intracranial Hemorrhage and Loss of Consciousness, Lewy Body Dementia, Arteriosclerotic Dementia w/ Depressive Features, Head Imaging, Head Injury with Loss of Consciousness

Brain Gains for Older Adults Who Start Exercising

Posted 30 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 30, 2015 – Beginning an exercise program may help protect older adults' brains or even reverse early mental decline, a small study suggests. Researchers placed 34 inactive people, aged 61 to 88, on an exercise regimen. It included moderate-intensity walking on a treadmill four times a week for 12 weeks. On average, heart/lung health improved about 8 percent over that time, the researchers found. Brain scans also showed an increase in the thickness of the participants' cortex, the outer layer of the brain that typically shrinks with Alzheimer's disease. Those with the greatest improvements in physical fitness had the most growth in the cortex, the University of Maryland researchers found. The thickening of the cortex occurred in both healthy people and those with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), an early stage of Alzheimer's disease, the study showed. The study was ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Neurologic Disorder, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia

Genes May Help Shield Seniors From Mental Decline: Study

Posted 30 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 30, 2015 – Humans have evolved to have gene variants that protect older adults from mental decline, new research suggests. "We unexpectedly discovered that humans have evolved gene variants that can help protect the elderly from dementia," study co-leader Dr. Ajit Varki, a professor of medicine and cellular and molecular medicine at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, said in a university news release. "Such genes likely evolved to preserve valuable and wise grandmothers and other elders, as well as to delay or prevent the emergence of dependent individuals who could divert resources and effort away from the care of the young," Varki added. Among vertebrates, humans and certain whales are exceptions to the rule that individuals die when they are no longer able to reproduce, the study authors said. This means that older people can continue to pass ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Diagnosis and Investigation, Head Imaging

Physical Fitness Linked to Mental Fitness in Seniors

Posted 12 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 12, 2015 – Connections between different parts of the brain weaken with age, but new research suggests that being physically fit can boost long-term brain function. A study from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign found that age-related differences in the brains of older adults varied, depending on their level of aerobic endurance. The researchers found greater fitness is associated with stronger brain connections later in life. However, the study did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship between the two. "Our study provides the strongest evidence to date that fitness in an older adult population can have substantial benefits to brain health in terms of the functional connections of different regions of the brain," Arthur Kramer, director of the Beckman Institute, said in a university news release. The study involved both younger and older adults. Using ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Lewy Body Dementia

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Related Condition Support Groups

Alzheimer's Disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Lewy Body Dementia, Arteriosclerotic Dementia, Central Nervous System Disorders

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