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Chronic Spasticity News

MS Drug Tied to Higher Risk for Potentially Deadly Brain Virus

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 27, 2016 – People with multiple sclerosis who are treated with the drug Tysabri (natalizumab) may have up to a 10 times greater risk for a rare and potentially deadly viral infection, a new study finds. The germ in question is the John Cunningham virus (JCV), a pathogen thought to cause a deadly brain condition known as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). The link between Tysabri and PML isn't new: Numerous studies published over the past few years have shown an increase in risk for the disease in patients taking the drug. However, even though the new study showed a link between Tysabri and JCV infection, experts stressed that the drug can be of great help to patients, who should weigh its benefits against its risks. The new research was led by Dr. Heinz Wiendl of the University of Muenster in Germany. The findings are published in the Jan. 27 online ... Read more

Related support groups: Multiple Sclerosis, Tysabri, Viral Infection, Chronic Spasticity, Natalizumab, Upper Limb Spasticity, Lower Limb Spasticity

Could High-Dose Vitamin D Help Fight Multiple Sclerosis?

Posted 31 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 30, 2015 – High-dose vitamin D appears safe for people with multiple sclerosis, and it may help quiet the immune system hyperactivity that marks the disease, a small clinical trial finds. The study, published online Dec. 30 in Neurology, bolsters evidence that vitamin D might benefit people with MS. But clinical trials are still underway to answer the big question: Does taking vitamin D improve MS symptoms and alter the course of the disease? The current study shows only that high doses – 10,400 IU a day – reduce the proportion of certain immune-system cells that have been implicated in the MS disease process. "I'm not going to make any claims beyond that," said senior researcher Dr. Peter Calabresi, a professor of neurology at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. "We don't have enough data here to guide clinical practice," he stressed. Bruce Bebo, executive vice ... Read more

Related support groups: Multiple Sclerosis, Dietary Supplementation, Vitamin D Deficiency, Vitamin/Mineral Supplementation and Deficiency, Chronic Spasticity, Caltrate 600 with D, Vitamin D Insufficiency, Os-Cal 500 with D, Calcium/Vitamin D, Oyster Shell Calcium, Rickets, Citracal + D, Oysco 500 with D, Calcarb with D, Calcium 600 D, Citracal Creamy Bites, Calcet, Upper Limb Spasticity, Oysco D with Calcium, Calvite P

New MS Drug Yields Mixed Results in Study

Posted 7 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2015 – Multiple sclerosis patients taking a new drug experienced fewer relapse rates but more side effects than patients receiving a standard MS therapy, new research indicates. In a trial comparing two sets of more than 900 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, scientists found that those taking the drug daclizumab HYP had a 45 percent lower relapse rate than those taking interferon beta-1a. But patients on the new drug, which has not yet been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, saw more side effects. Also, they did not experience significantly slower disease progression than those in the interferon beta-1a group over the first several months. "This is one more drug for multiple sclerosis, which is of course very welcome, but it's just one in addition to the 11 or 12 drugs we already have," said Dr. Eugene Lai, a neurologist at Houston ... Read more

Related support groups: Multiple Sclerosis, Avonex, Rebif, Chronic Spasticity, Interferon Beta-1A, Upper Limb Spasticity, Avonex Prefilled Syringe, Avonex Pen, Daclizumab, Rebif Rebidose, Zenapax

Paralyzed Man Walks Using Technology That Bypasses Spinal Cord

Posted 24 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 24, 2015 – A paralyzed 26-year-old man has walked for the first time in five years, thanks to an electrical system that connects his brain and legs, bypassing his injured spine, researchers are reporting. The unidentified man is the first person to show that a system like this might help people with a spinal cord injury regain some ability to walk, the researchers said. "The work does offer exciting promise," said Randy Trumbower, an assistant professor in the department of rehabilitation medicine at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, who was not involved with the research. That said, it "must overcome several hurdles before it may be applicable to a broad population of persons with spinal cord injury," he added. Study authors An Do and Zoran Nenadic, both at the University of California, Irvine, said they don't yet know how the system will work in a larger ... Read more

Related support groups: Spinal Cord Trauma, Central Nervous System Disorders, Chronic Spasticity, Paralytic Disorder

FDA Approves Movement Disorder Drug from CNS Therapeutics: Gablofen (Baclofen Injection) for the Treatment of Severe Spasticity

Posted 23 Nov 2010 by Drugs.com

ST. PAUL, Minn.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Nov 23, 2010 - Today, CNS Therapeutics announced the FDA approval of Gablofen (baclofen injection) for use in the management of severe spasticity, giving healthcare providers a new, easy-to-administer and cost-effective intrathecal baclofen treatment option. Severe spasticity is a movement disorder affecting more than 500,000 patients in the U.S. alone and is often brought on by multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, spinal cord injury, brain trauma and stroke. Richard Penn, M.D., a pioneer in intrathecal drug therapies and CNS Therapeutics co-founder and chief scientific officer, implanted the industry's first programmable intrathecal drug pump more than 25 years ago. "Until now, the evolution of intrathecal therapies has been limited to modest innovations in implantable devices," said Penn. "With Gablofen, CNS Therapeutics is driving the industry ahead ... Read more

Related support groups: Baclofen, Chronic Spasticity, Cerebral Spasticity

Botox (onabotulinumtoxinA) Receives FDA Approval for Treatment of Upper Limb Spasticity in Adults

Posted 10 Mar 2010 by Drugs.com

IRVINE, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Mar 10, 2010 - Allergan, Inc. today announced that the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Botox (onabotulinumtoxinA) for the treatment of increased muscle stiffness in the elbow, wrist and fingers in adults with upper limb spasticity. Spasticity is a debilitating condition impacting approximately 1 million Americans1, many of whom suffer from spasticity in the upper limbs following a stroke. Upper limb spasticity may also occur following a spinal cord or traumatic brain injury or in patients affected by multiple sclerosis or adults with a history of cerebral palsy. Although not a life-threatening condition, upper limb spasticity can be severely debilitating and painful, producing disfiguring muscle contractions that can result in stiff, tight muscles in the elbow, wrist and fingers, or a clenched fist. This stiffness hinders a ... Read more

Related support groups: Botox, Chronic Spasticity, Botulinum Toxin Type A

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Related Condition Support Groups

Upper Limb Spasticity, Lower Limb Spasticity, Multiple Sclerosis

Related Drug Support Groups

baclofen, Botox, dantrolene, Lioresal, Dantrium, Gablofen, Lioresal Intrathecal, Revonto, onabotulinumtoxina, Dantrium Intravenous, Kemstro