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Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Blog

Global Life Expectancy Continues to Climb

Posted 1 day 1 hour ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 17, 2014 – People around the world are living much longer than they did a few decades ago, a new study indicates. Worldwide life expectancy rose from 65.3 years in 1990 to 71.5 years in 2013, but women had slightly greater gains than men. During that time, life expectancy at birth increased 6.6 years for females and 5.8 years for males. If current trends continue, life expectancy in 2030 will be 85.3 years for females and 78.1 years for males, said researchers led by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington. "People today are less likely than their parents to die from certain conditions, but there are more people of older ages throughout the world," said Dr. Christopher Murray, institute director. "This is an encouraging trend as people are living longer. We just need to make sure we are making the right health policy decisions ... Read more

Related support groups: Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Timing of First Period Tied to Women's Later Heart Risk: Study

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 15, 2014 – The timing of a woman's first period may be linked to her later risk of heart disease, British researchers report. In a study of more than 1 million women, those who had their first period at age 10 or younger, or at age 17 or older, appeared to have a higher risk of heart disease, stroke and complications from high blood pressure. Women who had their first periods at age 10 or earlier were 27 percent more likely to be hospitalized or die from heart disease, the researchers found. Those who had their first menstrual cycle at or after age 17 were 23 percent more likely to be hospitalized or die from heart disease. The researchers found similar – though slightly weaker – associations for the risk of stroke and high blood pressure complications and early or late periods. "We now understand that the timing of the first menstrual cycle could have a long-term ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Feel Younger Than Your Age? It May Help You Live Longer

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 15, 2014 – Folks who feel "young at heart" may be more likely to live to a ripe old age, a new British study suggests. Seniors who said they felt three or more years younger than their actual age experienced a lower death rate over the course of eight years than people who either felt their full age or a little older, researchers report online Dec. 15 in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. About 25 percent of people who felt older than their actual age died, compared with about 14 percent of people who felt younger than their true age and almost 19 percent who felt their age. The effect held even after researchers accounted for things that might make a person feel older than they are, such as chronic health problems, difficulty with mobility or mental health issues like depression, said senior study author Andrew Steptoe, director of the Institute of Epidemiology and ... Read more

Related support groups: Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Study Casts Doubt on Low-Dose Aspirin for Women Under 65

Posted 14 days ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 4, 2014 – Although low-dose aspirin may curb the risks of heart disease and colon cancer, the downsides appear to outweigh the benefits for many women, a new large study suggests. For women younger than 65, researchers found taking low-dose aspirin for years lowered the risks of heart attack, stroke and colon cancer by a small amount. But they also found that the benefit was countered by an increase in the risk of major gastrointestinal bleeding – serious enough to land a woman in the hospital. The picture looked better for women age 65 and up. Aspirin boosted their risk of bleeding, too – but the benefits against heart disease and colon cancer were bigger, researchers reported. The study appeared online on Dec. 4 in the journal Heart. Many people have heard that low-dose aspirin is good for the heart, and may feel like it's a good idea to take some every day. But the ... Read more

Related support groups: Aspirin, Ecotrin, Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease, Bayer Aspirin, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Bufferin, Aspergum, Buffered Aspirin, Low Dose ASA, Ascriptin, ZORprin, Easprin, Ascriptin Enteric, St Joseph Aspirin, Aspir-Low, Genacote, Bayer Aspirin Regimen, Sloprin, Bayer Plus, Genprin

Could a 'Mediterranean' Diet Extend Your Life?

Posted 16 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 2, 2014 – There are hints in a new study that eating the much-lauded Mediterranean diet may help boost longevity. Researchers found that the regimen – rich in whole grains, vegetables, fruits, legumes, nuts, fish and olive oil – appears to be associated with longer telomere length, which are indicators of slower aging. Telomeres are located on the ends of chromosomes – much like the plastic tips on the end of shoelaces. According to geneticists, telomeres prevent chromosomes from fraying and scrambling the genetic codes they contain. These bits of genetic material naturally shorten with age, but they tend to shorten more slowly in healthy people. Shorter telomeres have long been associated with a greater risk of age-related diseases and a shorter life span, experts say. The new study was led by Immaculata De Vivo, an associate professor at Brigham and Women's Hospital ... Read more

Related support groups: Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Most Seniors Could Use Statins Under New Guidelines

Posted 24 Nov 2014 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 24, 2014 – Most older Americans qualify for treatment with cholesterol-lowering statins under new guidelines intended to reduce the risk of heart attack or stroke, a new study shows. Guidelines for the treatment of blood cholesterol released late last year by the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association target people most likely to benefit from taking statins such as Zocor (simvastatin) and Crestor (rosuvastatin). The new study of more than 6,000 black and white Americans aged 66 to 90 found that 70 percent were eligible for statin therapy, including 97 percent of those aged 66 to 75 and all of the men. The findings appear in a research letter published Nov. 24 in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. "The guidelines are a significant change from prior guidelines that relied heavily on levels of bad cholesterol to determine who to treat," letter ... Read more

Related support groups: High Cholesterol, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Crestor, Pravastatin, Atorvastatin, Zocor, Lovastatin, Rosuvastatin, Livalo, Red Yeast Rice, Pravachol, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Lescol, Lescol XL, Mevacor, Fluvastatin, Altoprev, Pitavastatin, Baycol

Kids Born to Overweight Moms May Face Higher Heart Risks as Adults

Posted 20 Nov 2014 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 20, 2014 – Overweight or obese women who get pregnant are much more likely to have a child who suffers from heart disease as an adult, new research suggests. But it looks like environment may play a greater role than genetics in that trend, the researchers added. "Mothers who are overweight teach behaviors, and those behaviors are passed on," said study author Dr. Michael Mendelson. He is a research fellow at the Framingham Heart Study, Boston University and the Boston Children's Hospital. "There's been mounting evidence that maternal health before going into pregnancy has implications for her offspring," Mendelson added. "This shows there are a lot of good reasons to focus on the health and weight of young people before they go on to have children." Researchers analyzed data on 879 participants in the Framingham Heart Study, the classic long-term, ongoing study of the ... Read more

Related support groups: Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

A Bad Marriage Burdens an Aging Heart

Posted 20 Nov 2014 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Nov. 20, 2014 – A bad marriage increases an older adult's risk of heart trouble, and that's particularly true for women, a new study contends. Researchers examined five years of data from 1,200 married American men and women, aged 57 to 85. People with spouses who were overly critical or demanding were more likely to develop heart disease than those with supportive mates, the researchers from Michigan State University said. They also found that a bad marriage's harmful impact on heart health increased with age. This may be because marriage-related stress might stimulate more – and more intense – cardiovascular responses due to declines in immune function and increasing frailty as people age, the researchers speculated. Women were more likely suffer poor heart health due to a bad marriage. One possible explanation: Women tend to internalize negative feelings, making them ... Read more

Related support groups: Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Daily Aspirin Fails to Help Heart in Japanese Study

Posted 17 Nov 2014 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Nov. 17, 2014 – Daily low-dose aspirin therapy may not have significant heart-health benefits for older people, new research suggests. The study, which involved more than 14,000 Japanese people aged 60 to 85, found no major difference in heart-related deaths or non-fatal heart attacks and strokes between people who took aspirin and those who didn't. "It indicates that primary prevention with daily low-dose aspirin does not reduce the combined risk in this population," said study co-author Dr. Kazuyuki Shimada, of the University of Shin-Oyama City Hospital in Tochigi, Japan. Despite this study's findings, people should talk with their doctor before they stop taking aspirin to prevent heart attacks and strokes, said Dr. Michael Gaziano, chief of the division of aging at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and a professor at Harvard Medical School. "Patients need to discuss ... Read more

Related support groups: Aspirin, Ecotrin, Bayer Aspirin, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Bufferin, Aspergum, Buffered Aspirin, Low Dose ASA, Ascriptin, ZORprin, Easprin, Ascriptin Enteric, St Joseph Aspirin, Aspir-Low, Genacote, Bayer Aspirin Regimen, Sloprin, Bayer Plus, Genprin, Empirin

If You Do Gain Weight, Polyunsaturated Fats May Prevent Some Damage

Posted 16 Oct 2014 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 16, 2014 – Muffins – and other fatty foods – can definitely put on the pounds, but those made with polyunsaturated oil may be safer for your heart than if they're made with saturated fats like butter, a small study suggests. That's because olive oil, sunflower oil and other polyunsaturated fats won't increase cholesterol like butter or palm oil, the researchers found. Thirty-nine healthy young adults in Sweden were asked to add four muffins a day to their diet so that researchers could evaluate the effects of different cooking fats. All of the volunteers gained weight, but those whose muffins were made with unsaturated sunflower oil had better cholesterol levels after seven weeks than the group that ate muffins baked with butter or palm oil, another saturated fat, the study found. High cholesterol is linked with an increased risk of heart disease. "Even modest weight ... Read more

Related support groups: Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

U.S. Life Expectancy Hits Record High of Nearly 79 Years: CDC

Posted 8 Oct 2014 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 8, 2014 – Average life expectancy in the United States reached an all-time high of 78.8 years in 2012, federal officials reported Wednesday. The increased life expectancy is likely due to Americans living healthier lifestyles, according to researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "Americans are living longer and are more aware of preventing chronic diseases," said the report's lead author, Dr. Jiaquan Xu, an epidemiologist at the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics. "Life expectancy has increased because people are eating healthier and exercising," Xu said. Women still have a life expectancy advantage over men. For those born in 2012, life expectancy is about 81 years for women and around 76 for men, Xu said. For people 65 years old in 2012, life expectancy was an additional 19.3 years, up slightly from the year before. Women age 65 ... Read more

Related support groups: Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Study: Healthy Lifestyle Behaviors May Prevent 80 Percent of Heart Attacks

Posted 22 Sep 2014 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 22, 2014 – Five recommended health behaviors may prevent four out of five heart attacks in men, a new study suggests. Middle-aged and older men were much less likely to have heart attacks over an average of 11 years if they drank moderately, didn't smoke and did everything right on the diet, exercise and weight fronts, the study found. Only about 1 percent of men involved in the study fit into this ultra-healthy-living category. But they were 86 percent less likely to have heart attacks than those who ate poorly, were overweight, exercised too little, smoked and drank too much alcohol, the researchers said. The healthiest men could still eventually die of a heart attack, of course, and the study didn't say if they live longer than others. Still, "there is a lot to gain and money to be saved if people had a healthier lifestyle," said study lead author Agneta Akesson, an ... Read more

Related support groups: Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Healthy Lifestyle Changes Linked to Reduced Risk for Dementia

Posted 17 Sep 2014 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 17, 2014 – Managing diabetes, quitting smoking, controlling high blood pressure, exercising and maintaining a healthy weight can reduce the risk for dementia – even late in life, according to new research. The World Alzheimer Report 2014, commissioned by Alzheimer's Disease International, revealed that diabetes can increase the risk of dementia by 50 percent. The study noted that obesity and an inactive lifestyle are key risk factors for diabetes as well as high blood pressure. The researchers suggested that dementia should be included in national public health prevention and detection programs along with other major non-communicable diseases, such as cancer and heart disease. They pointed out that it's never too late in life to make healthy lifestyle changes. "While age and genetics are part of the disease's risk factors, not smoking, eating more healthily, getting ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Smoking Cessation, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

Older Patients More Likely to Fill Prescriptions for Generic Statins: Study

Posted 15 Sep 2014 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 15, 2014 – Patients prescribed cholesterol-lowering drugs are more likely to fill their prescriptions and gain health benefits if the medications are cheaper generic brands, new research suggests. At issue are the cholesterol-lowering drugs known as statins. Well-known brands include Crestor, Zocor and Lipitor. Generic statins are also available. The drugs are designed to lower the risk of heart problems due to clogged arteries. About half of patients on statins stop taking them within the first year, explained study lead author Joshua Gagne, an assistant professor of medicine with Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston. Statins are among the most "notorious" medications in terms of low adherence – patients actually taking them when they're prescribed, said Dr. Orli Etingin, a professor of clinical medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College-New ... Read more

Related support groups: High Cholesterol, Lipitor, Simvastatin, Crestor, Pravastatin, Atorvastatin, Zocor, Lovastatin, Rosuvastatin, Livalo, Red Yeast Rice, Pravachol, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Lescol, Lescol XL, Mevacor, Fluvastatin, Altoprev, Pitavastatin, Baycol

Blood Pressure Seems to Stay Lower Longer in Fitter Men

Posted 15 Sep 2014 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 15, 2014 – Aerobic exercise leading to strong heart fitness can delay a man's onset of age-related high blood pressure by nearly a decade, a new study suggests. Blood pressure naturally increases as people grow older and their arteries become stiffer with age. But men with strong cardio-fitness don't start drifting toward high blood pressure until their mid-50s. On the other hand, largely sedentary men usually experience the early signs of high blood pressure in their mid-40s, researchers report in the Sept. 15 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. "A higher level of fitness can significantly delay this natural increase of blood pressure with age," said study co-author Dr. Xuemei Sui, an assistant professor in the department of exercise science at the University of South Carolina's Arnold School of Public Health. "For those with a high level of ... Read more

Related support groups: High Blood Pressure, Hypertension, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

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simvastatin, Micardis, Zocor, telmisartan, Juvisync, simvastatin / sitagliptin