Skip to Content

Join the 'Brain Tumor' group to help and get support from people like you.

Brain Tumor News

Related terms: Brain Cancer, Brain Tumor, metastatic, Cancer, Brain, Intracranial Tumors

Allergies, Asthma Tied to Lower Risk of Brain Cancer

Posted 1 day 1 hour ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Feb. 5, 2016 – People with respiratory allergies, asthma and the skin condition eczema may be less likely to develop glioma brain cancer, a new study suggests. The international team of researchers looked at more than 4,500 glioma patients and almost 4,200 people without brain cancer. The investigators found that a history of respiratory allergies, asthma and eczema was associated with a reduced risk for glioma. People with respiratory allergies or eczema were 30 percent less likely to develop the deadly brain cancer than those without such conditions, the study found. Although the study found an association between allergic conditions and a lower risk of gliomas, it wasn't designed to prove a cause-and-effect relationship between those factors. The study was released online Feb. 5 in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention. "Many other studies have shown this ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Asthma, Asthma - Maintenance, Eczema, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Brain Tumor, Asthma - Acute, Anaphylaxis, Glioblastoma Multiforme, Head and Neck Cancer, Allergic Asthma, Malignant Glioma, Head Imaging

Majority of Americans and Canadians Expects Cancer Cure in Their Lifetime

Posted 2 days 1 hour ago by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Feb. 4, 2016 – A majority of American and Canadian adults believe a cure for cancer will be found in their lifetime, and that a cancer diagnosis is not a death sentence, according to a new Harris Poll. Nearly three out of five Americans and Canadians expect a cure for cancer in their lifetime. That belief is especially strong among those ages 18 to 34. Nearly three-quarters of young Americans and 69 percent of Canadians in that age group expect a cure in their lifetime. And, about two-thirds of Americans and Canadians don't think death is inevitable when someone is diagnosed with cancer, the poll found. However, Americans adults under 35 are more likely to believe that a cancer diagnosis is a death sentence than those 35 and older (39 percent vs. 29 percent). Americans whose lives have been affected by cancer are also more likely to view cancer as deadly compared to those who ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prostate Cancer, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Brain Tumor, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Pancreatic Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Stomach Cancer, Breast Cancer, Prevention, Head and Neck Cancer, Gastric Cancer, Breast Cancer - Palliative, Testicular Cancer, Solid Tumors, Urinary Tract Cancer

Newer Treatment May Be Easier on Children With Brain Tumors

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Jan. 29, 2016 – A new type of treatment called proton radiotherapy is as effective as standard photon (X-ray) radiation therapy in treating a common type of brain tumor in children, a new study reports. And the new therapy causes fewer long-term side effects, the researchers said. "Proton radiotherapy is still not widely available in the U.S. or around the world, but it is increasingly recognized for its potential to reduce the side effects of treatment, particularly in the pediatric population," study author Dr. Torunn Yock said in a news release from Massachusetts General Hospital. "At experienced centers, proton therapy has a proven track record of treatment success and safety," added Yock. She is an associate professor of radiation oncology at Harvard Medical School in Boston. In photon radiotherapy, a dose of radiation is delivered all along the X-ray beam as it passes ... Read more

Related support groups: Brain Tumor, Diagnosis and Investigation, History - Radiation Therapy, Head Imaging

Terminal Cancer Patients in U.S. Less Likely to Die in Hospitals

Posted 18 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 19, 2016 – Comparing end-of-life practices internationally, researchers found the United States has the lowest percentage of in-hospital cancer deaths among seven developed countries. Terminally ill U.S. cancer patients also spend less time in the hospital the last six months of life than those in the other countries, although they are more likely to receive intensive care and chemotherapy, researchers found. The study, published in the Jan. 19 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, suggests that end-of-life care has changed significantly in response to patient preferences. "In the early 1980s, more than 70 percent of U.S. cancer patients died in hospital," wrote Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel, of the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine, and colleagues. Over the last 30 years, the researchers said, several factors have helped advance ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Brain Tumor, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Bladder Cancer, Stomach Cancer, Solid Tumors, History - Skin Cancer, Urinary Tract Cancer

Families Say Hospice Better Than Hospital for Dying Cancer Patients

Posted 18 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 19, 2016 – Families of patients dying of cancer felt their loved one had better care and quality of life when they died in a hospice rather than in a hospital's intensive care unit, a new study reveals. Relatives reported a better end-of-life experience more often when their loved one received hospice care for more than three days (59 percent) than those who received hospice care for three or fewer days (43 percent). Moreover, only 45 percent of families reported excellent care when the patient was admitted to a hospital intensive care unit (ICU) within 30 days of dying, the researchers found. "Our findings are a powerful argument for the importance of advance care planning," said lead researcher Dr. Alexi Wright, an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School in Boston. How and where people die strongly shapes patients' dying experience and how family ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Breast Cancer, Lung Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Brain Tumor, Melanoma, Skin Cancer, Endometrial Cancer, Bladder Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, Gastric Cancer, Breast Cancer - Palliative

Electromagnetic Waves May Help Fight Deadly Brain Cancer

Posted 15 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 15, 2015 – Low-intensity electromagnetic waves might help slow a quick-growing and deadly form of brain cancer, researchers report. Patients with glioblastoma experienced slightly better overall survival and delayed recurrence of their brain cancer if their heads were exposed to a type of electromagnetic field therapy alongside conventional chemotherapy, the Swiss research team found. This therapy, called tumor-treating fields, already is approved in the United States and could prove useful in tackling other forms of cancer, said lead researcher Dr. Roger Stupp, chairman of the department of oncology and cancer center at the University Hospital Zurich. "This treatment may soon become a valuable addition to many situations where improved local tumor control by a noninvasive treatment is of importance," Stupp said. The tumor-treating field device resembles a swimmer's cap, ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Brain Tumor, Glioblastoma Multiforme, Head and Neck Cancer, Diagnosis and Investigation

Jimmy Carter's Recovery Highlights Power of New Cancer Treatments

Posted 7 Dec 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Dec. 7, 2015 – Former President Jimmy Carter's remarkable response to his treatment for brain cancer can be chalked up in part to significant recent advances in medicine, cancer experts say. Carter, 91, announced on Sunday that brain scans have shown there are no longer any signs of the melanoma cancer that had spread to his brain. That does not mean, however, that he has been cured of the cancer, and he will continue to undergo medical treatment. His successful treatment benefited from improvements in radiation therapy and immunotherapy, said Dr. Alexis Demopoulos, director of neuro-oncology at North Shore-LIJ's Brain Tumor Center in Lake Success, N.Y. "I'm not surprised he did as well as he did," said Demopoulos. "We're on the edge of a revolution in oncology." Early detection of Carter's brain lesions also helped, as did the relatively small size and fortuitous location of ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Brain Tumor, Melanoma, Melanoma - Metastatic, Diagnosis and Investigation, Keytruda, Head Imaging

Childhood Cancer Tied to Raised Risk for Other Ills in Adult Life

Posted 11 Nov 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 11, 2015 – Childhood cancer survivors are at increased risk for diabetes and other autoimmune diseases, a new study suggests. "Cure is no longer a sufficient goal in childhood cancer care," the researchers wrote. "As the vast majority of these patients survive, attention must be paid to their long-term quality of life and health challenges." In the study, the investigators analyzed data from more than 20,000 adults in Denmark, Iceland and Sweden, who had cancer before the age of 20 and survived for at least one year, and compared them to nearly 126,000 adults who did not have childhood cancer. Over an average follow-up of 15 to 19 years, 3.6 percent of childhood cancer survivors were treated in a hospital at least once for an autoimmune disease. That rate is 40 percent higher than among the adults who did not have childhood cancer, according to Dr. Anna Sallfors ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Cancer, Leukemia, Autoimmune Disorders, Brain Tumor, Hodgkin's Lymphoma

Childhood Brain Tumor Survivors May Have Memory Troubles

Posted 2 Oct 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2015 – Adult survivors of childhood brain tumors appear to have worse working memory than other adults, a small study finds. Researchers tested 17 adult survivors of pediatric brain tumors in the posterior fossa part of the brain. Then they tested a control group of 17 healthy adults. The brain tumor survivors scored significantly lower on tests of working memory, the study found. Working memory is the ability to retain and use information for short periods of time. The researchers said working memory is an important component of higher-level thinking. Brain scans showed that different areas of the brain appeared to "activate" more in brain tumor survivors during a verbal working memory task compared to healthy adults. Increased activation in those areas was linked to worse performance on more demanding working memory tasks, the researchers said. "Our goal was to ... Read more

Related support groups: Brain Tumor, Mild Cognitive Impairment

Signs of Brain Tumor May Show in Blood Years Before Diagnosis

Posted 18 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 18, 2015 – Brain tumors known as gliomas usually produce symptoms several months before they're diagnosed, but new research found changes in immune function may occur up to five years before these cancers are detected. "Now, clinicians don't have any way to detect the tumors until patients have symptoms, which is typically three months before diagnosis. I see something five years before," study author Judith Schwartzbaum, an associate professor of epidemiology at Ohio State University, in Columbus. Researchers analyzed blood samples collected over 40 years in Norway from people getting annual checkups or donating blood. Norway also has a cancer registry, enabling the researchers to identify blood samples of people who developed a brain tumor. The blood samples were collected an average of 15 years before tumors were detected. Specifically, the researchers compared ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Brain Tumor, Diagnosis and Investigation, Malignant Glioma

Excess Weight Linked to Brain Cancer Risk in Study

Posted 16 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 16, 2015 – Weight and physical activity levels may affect the risk of a certain brain cancers, new research suggests. Excess weight was associated with a higher risk of a type of brain cancer known as meningioma. Obesity increased the risk of meningioma by 54 percent, and being overweight upped the risk by 21 percent, the study found. On the other hand, people who were physically active reduced the risk of meningioma by 27 percent, the researchers said. "There are very few known preventive factors for these tumors," said study author Gundula Behrens, from the department of epidemiology and preventive medicine at the University of Regensburg in Germany. "According to our study, reducing excess weight and adopting a physically active lifestyle may help prevent meningiomas." The study also found that being heavier was not linked to the risk of a second, deadlier form of ... Read more

Related support groups: Obesity, Brain Tumor

Removing All Visible Cancer Is Key to Treating Aggressive Brain Tumors

Posted 14 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 14, 2015 – Surgery that removes all visible cancer significantly improves the chances of survival for children with aggressive brain tumors, especially girls. That's the finding of a study that included almost 100 children treated for high-grade glioma brain cancer between 1988 and 2010. These rare brain tumors occur in fewer than one in 100,000 children and teens. After two years, the overall survival rate was 45 percent; 25 percent had no cancer progression. Surgery to remove all visible signs of cancer was successful in one-third of the children. Their median survival was 3.4 years, compared with 1.6 years for those who did not have all visible cancer removed. Median means half of the children lived longer, half did not. The survival benefit after successful surgery was much greater in girls, with median survival of 8.1 years. Boys had a median survival of 2.4 years. ... Read more

Related support groups: Brain Tumor, Glioblastoma Multiforme, Neurosurgery, Malignant Glioma

Treatments for Brain Cancer Take Heavy Toll on the Brain

Posted 3 Sep 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 3, 2015 – Radiation and chemotherapy can cause structural changes in the healthy brain tissue of patients with glioblastoma brain tumors, a new study finds. The research included 14 glioblastoma patients who underwent 35 weeks of combined radiation and chemotherapy (chemoradiation) after having their tumors surgically removed. The patients had brain scans before and after chemoradiation, but an adequate number of images were obtained from only eight of the patients. Those images revealed a significant decrease in whole brain volume – the overall amount of brain tissue – throughout chemoradiation. The reduced amount of brain tissue became apparent within a few weeks after the start of chemoradiation and was primarily seen in gray matter. The scans also showed that the size of the brain's ventricles – cerebrospinal fluid-filled spaces deep within the brain – grew ... Read more

Related support groups: Brain Tumor, Glioblastoma Multiforme, Malignant Glioma

U.S. Oncologists Decry High Cost of Cancer Drugs

Posted 23 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 23, 2015 – Soaring costs for cancer drugs are hurting patient care in the United States, a group of top oncologists claim. "High cancer-drug prices are affecting the care of patients with cancer and our health care system," Dr. Ayalew Tefferi, a hematologist at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., said in a Mayo news release. Tefferi and his colleagues made a number of recommendations on how to address the problem in a commentary published July 23 in the Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Allowing Medicare to negotiate drug prices is one of the suggestions the team of 118 leading cancer experts offered as a possible solution. Along with their recommendations, the group also expressed support for a patient-based grassroots movement on change.org that is demanding action on the issue. "The average gross household income in the U.S. is about $52,000 per year. For an insured patient with ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Provera, Depo-Provera, Methotrexate, Breast Cancer, Accutane, Lupron, Prostate Cancer, Tamoxifen, Medroxyprogesterone, Arimidex, Femara, Tretinoin, Lupron Depot, Gleevec, Fluorouracil, Lung Cancer, Rituxan, Colorectal Cancer, Renal Cell Carcinoma

Patients with Low-Grade Brain Tumors Living Longer

Posted 1 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, JuLY 1, 2015 – Survival has improved for adults with low-grade brain tumors, known as gliomas, a new study finds. Low-grade gliomas grow slowly but are deadly. Because they're uncommon, they are not well-studied, said the researchers from the University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine. The best ways to manage these tumors are also controversial. There is little consensus on whether or when to use radiation or what type of surgery or chemotherapy patients should undergo. "An understanding of how our treatments affect the survival of low-grade glioma patients will better enable us to help these patients," senior study author Dr. Clark Chen, vice chairman of research and academic development in neurosurgery, said in a university news release. For the study, published July 1 in Neuro-Oncology: Clinical Practice, researchers examined data compiled in a U.S. cancer ... Read more

Related support groups: Cancer, Brain Tumor, Malignant Glioma

Page 1 2 3 4 Next

Ask a Question

Further Information

Related Condition Support Groups

Glioblastoma Multiforme, Pituitary Tumor, Anaplastic Astrocytoma, Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma, Malignant Glioma, Angioblastoma, Cancer

Related Drug Support Groups

methotrexate, Afinitor, cisplatin, cyclophosphamide, everolimus, Platinol, lomustine, Zortress, Afinitor Disperz, view more... Gleostine, Gliadel, BiCNU, carmustine, CeeNU, Platinol-AQ