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Anxiety and Stress Blog

Related terms: Acute Stress Reaction

After Blowing Their Stack, a Heart Attack

Posted 3 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 24, 2015 – Intense anger or anxiety greatly increases the risk of heart attack, a new study warns. "While the absolute risk of any one anger episode triggering a heart attack is low, our data demonstrates that the danger is real and still there," said Dr. Thomas Buckley, a senior lecturer and researcher from the University of Sydney and Royal North Shore Hospital in Australia. The increased risk of heart attack after intense anger or anxiety is "most likely the result of increased heart rate and blood pressure, tightening of blood vessels and increased clotting, all associated with triggering of heart attacks," Buckley said. In the study, Buckley's team assessed more than 300 heart attack patients and asked them to use a 7-point scale to rate their levels of anger over the previous 48 hours. On the scale, 1 was calm, 5 was intense anger, and 7 was enraged/out of control. ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction, Cardiovascular Risk Reduction, Myocardial Infarction - Prophylaxis

Stress May Make Recovery From Heart Attack Harder for Younger Women

Posted 18 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Feb. 9, 2015 – When younger people have heart attacks, stress may lead to a worse recovery. This problem may be of particular concern among women, a new study suggests. Although stress affects both men and women, researchers found that women had higher levels of stress than men. Those higher stress levels may have played a role in their worse recovery in the month after suffering a heart attack. Women had more chest pain, poorer quality of life and worse overall health than men, the researchers found. "People need to be aware of the adverse impact on health of mental stress, and in this particular case, it may affect recovery after heart attack," said lead author Xiao Xu, an assistant professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences at Yale School of Medicine. "Also, younger women experience greater stress than younger men. This may put women at higher risk for ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Heart Attack, Myocardial Infarction

Money Tops Americans' List of Stressors

Posted 4 Feb 2015 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 4, 2015 – Money continues to be the leading cause of stress for Americans, a new survey finds. Overall, stress in the United States is at a seven-year low, and average stress levels are declining, the American Psychological Association poll found. But money worries continue to nag at the American psyche, despite the ongoing economic recovery, the association says in its report released Feb. 4, entitled Stress in America: Paying With Our Health. Financial worries served as a significant source of stress for 64 percent of adults in 2014, ranking higher than three other major sources of stress: work (60 percent), family responsibilities (47 percent), and health concerns (46 percent). Nearly three out of four adults reported feeling stressed about money at least some of the time, and about one in four adults said they experienced extreme stress over money during the past ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress

Expectant Dads May Also Have Hormonal Changes, Study Suggests

Posted 17 Dec 2014 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 17, 2014 – While women's hormonal fluctuations during pregnancy are well-known, new research shows that men experience swings of their own as their partner's pregnancy progresses. "There are hormonal changes going on with men as well, and they occur earlier than other studies have suggested," said lead researcher Robin Edelstein, an associate professor of psychology at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. "What we found is there is a gradual decline in men's testosterone," she said. The study was published online Dec. 15 in the American Journal of Human Biology. Edelstein and her team followed 29 expectant heterosexual couples, all expecting their first child together. They looked at four different times throughout the pregnancy, evaluating salivary testosterone, cortisol, estradiol and progesterone. They looked at the levels of those hormones at weeks 12, 20, 28 and ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress

Constant Email Checks Can Leave You Stressed

Posted 15 Dec 2014 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, Dec. 13, 2014 – Looking for a way to help reduce your stress? Try checking your emails less often, researchers suggest. The new study featured 124 adults – including students, financial analysts, medical professionals and others – who were divided into two groups. During the first week, one group checked their emails only three times a day, while the other group checked their emails as often as they liked. The groups then switched for the second week of the study. "Our findings showed that people felt less stressed when they checked their email less often," study author Kostadin Kushlev, a Ph.D. candidate in psychology at the University of British Columbia in Canada, said in a university news release. However, changing email habits proved difficult for many of the study participants, the investigators found. "Most participants in our study found it quite difficult to check ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress

Teen Conflicts Spill Over to Other Areas of Their Lives

Posted 23 Oct 2014 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 23, 2014 – Teens' conflicts at home increase the risk of problems at school for up to two days, according to a new study. The research also found that the reverse is true: school problems can create issues at home. Additionally, the study found that bad mood and mental health symptoms such as depression and anxiety are important factors in what's referred to as "spillover effect." Problems that can spill over between home and school include arguments between teens and their parents, skipping class, not completing assignments, difficulty understanding school work, and doing poorly on a quiz or test, the University of Southern California researchers explained. For example, failing a test could cause a teen to be irritable, which in turn could lead to an argument with parents. The researchers also found that teens with more symptoms of anxiety and depression were more ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Anxiety and Stress

Health Tip: Anxiety Can Affect Your Health

Posted 22 Oct 2014 by Drugs.com

-- A person with generalized anxiety disorder describes someone who worries excessively, often making it difficult to get through the day. The Womenshealth.gov website says physical symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder include: Significant and unexplained fatigue. Aches, pains and tension in the muscles. Headaches. Twitching or trembling. Irritability. Difficulty swallowing. Sweating excessively. Hot flashes. Nausea, lightheadedness or shortness of breath. Going to the bathroom more frequently. Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Anxiety and Stress

Ebola Anxiety: A Bigger Threat Now Than the Virus Itself

Posted 21 Oct 2014 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Oct. 21, 2014 – Headlines remain riveted on the three Ebola cases in Dallas. But, mental health specialists say overblown fear is a much bigger health threat to Americans. President Barack Obama on Friday appointed an Ebola "czar" to oversee the U.S. response to the virus, which has infected two Dallas nurses who cared for a Liberian man who died of Ebola this month at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital. But the U.S. cases are miniscule in the context of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa that's concentrated in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone and has so far killed more than 4,500 people, according to the World Health Organization. Still, U.S. mental health experts say the combination of a deadly infection, uncertainty about how the Dallas nurses contracted it and constant media coverage could set the stage for widespread public anxiety. Americans aren't in panic mode yet, said ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever

Stress Affects Women, Men With Heart Disease Differently, Study Shows

Posted 13 Oct 2014 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 13, 2014 – Stress triggers different physical and mental reactions in women and men with heart disease, new research indicates. The study involved 254 men and 56 women with stable heart disease who did three mentally stressful tasks: an math test, a mirror tracing test and an anger recall test. Stress had a greater impact on blood pressure and heart rate in men, while women were more likely to experience decreased blood flow to the heart and increased clumping of blood cells associated with clot formation. Women also had a greater increase in negative emotions and a larger decline in positive emotions while doing the stressful tasks, according to the study published Oct. 13 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. "The relationship between mental stress and cardiovascular disease is well known," study author Dr. Zainab Samad, an assistant professor of medicine ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Heart Disease

Genes May Make Some More Prone to Heart Disease When Under Stress

Posted 1 Oct 2014 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 1, 2014 – Genes may interact with stress to trigger heart disease in some people, a new study suggests. The genetic risk occurs in about 13 percent of people, but only in those who are white. The finding could help these people reduce their heart disease risk through simple measures such as exercise, a healthy diet and stress management, the Duke University researchers said. The study authors analyzed genetic data from nearly 6,000 people and found a strong link between variations in the EBF1 gene and higher levels of central obesity, as measured by hip circumference. In people with these gene variations, their hips grew wider as their stress levels increased. Further investigation revealed a "significant pathway" to high blood sugar levels, diabetes and heart disease, most notably a narrowing of the arteries. "These findings suggest that a stress reduction ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Heart Disease

Stress Might Be Even More Unhealthy for the Obese

Posted 29 Sep 2014 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 26, 2014 – Recurring emotional stress may trigger a stronger biochemical response in overweight people, possibly increasing their risk of chronic illnesses such as heart disease and type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests. Researchers found that overweight people repeatedly placed in a stressful situation exhibited increasing amounts of interleukin-6, a protein that promotes inflammation in the body, in their saliva. Normal weight people did not exhibit this escalation in interleukin-6 levels when exposed to repeated stress. The inflammation caused by interleukin-6 has been associated with a number of conditions for which obesity itself creates an increased risk, including hardening of the arteries, type 2 diabetes, cancer and fatty liver disease, the researchers said. "You already are at risk for these diseases by being obese, and then you have these magnified responses ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Obesity

Stress Might Be Even More Unhealthy for the Obese

Posted 29 Sep 2014 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Sept. 26, 2014 – Recurring emotional stress may trigger a stronger biochemical response in overweight people, possibly increasing their risk of chronic illnesses such as heart disease and type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests. Researchers found that overweight people repeatedly placed in a stressful situation exhibited increasing amounts of interleukin-6, a protein that promotes inflammation in the body, in their saliva. Normal weight people did not exhibit this escalation in interleukin-6 levels when exposed to repeated stress. The inflammation caused by interleukin-6 has been associated with a number of conditions for which obesity itself creates an increased risk, including hardening of the arteries, type 2 diabetes, cancer and fatty liver disease, the researchers said. "You already are at risk for these diseases by being obese, and then you have these magnified responses ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Obesity

Health Tip: Ward Off Stress

Posted 25 Sep 2014 by Drugs.com

-- No one's life is stress-free, so it's important to deal with stress and prevent undue anxiety when possible. The American Academy of Family Physicians suggests these healthy ways to manage stress: Don't spend time worrying about things that are out of your control, such as the weather. Instead, focus on solving small problems that you can influence. If you're worried about an event, such as a job interview, prepare as much as possible. Instead of seeing change as threatening, interpret it as a positive challenge. Ask friends and family to talk you through bothersome events or conflicts. Don't over-schedule yourself. Make sure your goals are realistic. Get plenty of regular exercise, eat a healthy diet and get plenty of sleep. Pursue hobbies that you enjoy. Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress

Family Squabbles Can Derail Recovery From Cancer Surgery

Posted 18 Sep 2014 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 18, 2014 – Cancer patients burdened by stress and family conflicts before surgery may face a higher risk for complications following their operation, a new study suggests. Investigators found that patients with a so-called quality-of-life "deficit" appeared to have a nearly three times greater risk for complications compared to those with a normal or good quality of life. "We've long known that patient quality of life is a complex and important construction," said study lead author Dr. Juliane Bingener, a professor of surgery at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. "It involves spiritual health, mental health, social support and family support. And we know that for cancers such as colon, pancreatic and lung cancer, it can predict overall survival. But what we didn't know is if it also correlates with complication risk following surgery." What the researchers found, ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Cancer

Family Squabbles Can Derail Recovery From Cancer Surgery

Posted 18 Sep 2014 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Sept. 18, 2014 – Cancer patients burdened by stress and family conflicts before surgery may face a higher risk for complications following their operation, a new study suggests. Investigators found that patients with a so-called quality-of-life "deficit" appeared to have a nearly three times greater risk for complications compared to those with a normal or good quality of life. "We've long known that patient quality of life is a complex and important construction," said study lead author Dr. Juliane Bingener, a professor of surgery at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. "It involves spiritual health, mental health, social support and family support. And we know that for cancers such as colon, pancreatic and lung cancer, it can predict overall survival. But what we didn't know is if it also correlates with complication risk following surgery." What the researchers found, ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety and Stress, Cancer

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