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Related terms: Anaphylactic Reaction, Anaphylactic Shock, Shock, Anaphylactic

Health Tip: If Allergic to Eggs

Posted 6 days ago by Drugs.com

-- People who are allergic to eggs don't have to miss out on the tasty versatility that eggs offer. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics suggests these alternatives: In place of scrambled eggs, use cubed firm tofu. In the pan, gently smash it with a fork to make it crumble like a scrambled egg. Sprinkle with a little turmeric for yellow coloring. Use diced extra-firm tofu in place of hard-boiled eggs in salads and sandwiches. Or opt for white beans or baked, ready-to-eat tofu. Use chia seeds or flax seeds mixed with water (1 tablespoon seeds to 3 tablespoons water) in place of eggs in baking to help bind batter. You'll need to let the mixture rest for 15 to 20 minutes. Substitute applesauce, avocado, mashed banana, silken tofu or garbanzo beans for eggs to make baked goods creamier, more moist and richer. For a simple protein-rich snack, opt for Greek yogurt. One-quarter cup (plain, ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergies, Allergic Reactions, Angioedema, Anaphylaxis, Allergic Purpura

Medical Groups Endorse Early Exposure to Peanut Products for High-Risk Infants

Posted 7 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 26, 2015 – Infants at high risk for peanut allergies should be given foods containing peanuts before they reach the age of 1 year, a new consensus statement from 10 medical groups states. The interim guidance, which runs counter to conventional thought, was issued by the American Academy of Pediatrics and other expert groups in response to a study published in February that found early exposure to peanut products reduced the risk of a peanut allergy developing by 80 percent. The statement will be published in the September issue of the journal Pediatrics. When the study was published in the New England Journal of Medicine, lead researcher Dr. Gideon Lack, from the department of pediatric allergy at King's College London in England, noted that introducing peanut products early was safe and well tolerated. Infants were not given whole peanuts because of the risk of ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergies, Allergic Reactions, Anaphylaxis

Add Asthma, Allergy Plans to Your Back-to-School List

Posted 3 Aug 2015 by Drugs.com

SATURDAY, Aug. 1, 2015 – If your child has asthma or allergies, make sure his or her teacher, principal and school nurse know about it as part of your back-to-school planning, the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) recommends. "More than 10 million kids under age 18 have asthma, and one in four suffer from respiratory allergies," ACAAI President Dr. James Sublett said in a news release from the organization. "Many kids with asthma and food allergies don't have a plan in place at school. An allergy or asthma action plan doesn't do any good if it's not shared with the people who can act on it," he noted. The first step is to have allergy/asthma control measures at home, such as lowering exposure to triggers and taking prescribed medications. At school, it's important for teachers to know your child's asthma and allergy triggers so that they can help the youngster ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Asthma, Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Allegra, Asthma - Maintenance, Phenergan, Diphenhydramine, Loratadine, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Asthma - Acute, Chlorpheniramine, Periactin, Cyproheptadine

Health Tip: Are You Allergic to Latex?

Posted 20 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Latex is a rubbery sap produced by trees that is used in many products, from balloons to rubber gloves. Latex allergy is common, and symptoms vary. The American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology mentions these possible symptoms: Skin that appears red, scaly or itchy after touching latex. A runny nose, sneezing, wheezing or coughing. Itchy throat or watery, itchy eyes. Anaphylaxis, a life-threatening reaction potentially characterized by difficulty breathing or swallowing, passing out, chest tightness or vomiting. Read more

Related support groups: Allergies, Allergic Reactions, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Anaphylaxis, Allergic Asthma, Oral Allergy Syndrome

Second Severe Allergic Reaction Isn't Uncommon

Posted 10 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, July 10, 2015 – About 15 percent of children who have a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) can have a second one within a few hours, a new study shows. "The key message here for parents, caregivers and first responders is to administer epinephrine at the first sign of a severe allergic reaction to prevent anaphylaxis from worsening," Dr. James Sublett, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology, said in a college news release. "Anaphylaxis symptoms occur suddenly and can progress quickly. Always have a second dose with you and, when in doubt, administer it, too. Anaphylaxis can be fatal if left untreated," he added. Early symptoms of a severe allergic reaction may be mild, such as a runny nose, skin rash or "strange feeling." But these symptoms can quickly progress to more serious problems, including difficulty breathing, hives or swelling, throat ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergies, Allergic Reactions, Epinephrine, Anaphylaxis, EpiPen, Primatene Mist, Adrenalin, Primatene Mist Inhaler, EpiPen 2-Pak, EpiPen Jr, Asthmahaler, Adrenalin Chloride, Sus-Phrine Injection, EpiPen Auto-Injector, Twinject Auto-Injector, EpiPen JR 2-Pak, Bronitin, Medihaler-Epi, Epi EZ Pen, Auvi-Q

How to Avoid July Fourth Allergy Flare-Ups

Posted 2 Jul 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 – Fireworks, picnics and parades are favorite Fourth of July traditions for many people, but for those with allergies or asthma these activities could be uncomfortable or even dangerous. "Summer is the time of year when everyone wants to enjoy being outside," said allergist Dr. James Sublett, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. "That's why it's so important to be prepared, so allergies and asthma don't overshadow the festivities." Asthma and allergy experts offer these tips for avoiding or coping with common summer triggers, particularly on the holiday weekend: Smoke: Fireworks and campfires are fun holiday traditions but smoke can trigger an asthma flare-up. Try to maintain a safe distance from fireworks and campfires or stand upwind. It's also important to carry a reliever inhaler at all times. Chlorine: Chlorine isn't an ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergies, Allergic Reactions, Asthma, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Asthma - Acute, Anaphylaxis, Nasal Polyps, Allergic Asthma, Oral Allergy Syndrome

Summer Spurs Calls to Poison Centers

Posted 12 Jun 2015 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, June 12, 2015 – The wet spring in many parts of the United States has led to mold and mildew in some homes, leading people to get out the bleach. As a result, calls about bleach exposure are on the rise this summer, the Nebraska Regional Poison Center says. Household bleach can cause problems if it gets in the eyes or is swallowed. Also, bleach should never be used with other cleaning products. When bleach comes into contact with other cleaners that contain acids or ammonia, a dangerous gas can form. Summer also brings an increase in calls about insect bites and stings, and barbecue-related toxins, the poison center said in a news release. If someone is stung, watch closely for signs of an allergic reaction, especially within the first hour, the poison center said. Many people use DEET-containing insect repellents. These products should be applied sparingly to skin and ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergies, Allergic Reactions, Anaphylaxis, Infectious Gastroenteritis, Ammonium Chloride, Ammonium Chloride/Chlorpheniramine/Codeine/Phenylephrine, Quelidrine, Diethyltoluamide, Ammonium Chloride/Chlorpheniramine/Dextromethorphan/Ephedrine/Ipecac/Phenylephrine, Rolatuss

Do You Need a Doctor for Bug Bites and Bee Stings?

Posted 25 May 2015 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, May 24, 2015 – Summer is fast approaching, along with its usual bonanza of bugs. Fortunately, most of those inevitable bites and stings aren't serious. But, experts from the American Academy of Dermatology advise going to the emergency room right away if you notice any of the following symptoms soon after a bug bite or sting: Difficulty breathing, The feeling that your throat is closing, Swelling of lips, tongue or face, Chest pain, A racing heartbeat for more than a few minutes, Dizziness or headache, Vomiting. Also beware of a red rash that looks like a donut or bullseye target after a tick bite, or a fever with a spreading red or black spotty rash. These can be signs of serious tick-related illness. "Although most bug bites and stings do not turn into a severe or even fatal illness like Rocky Mountain spotted fever, it's important to pay attention to your symptoms," Dr. ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergies, Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Allegra, Phenergan, Diphenhydramine, Loratadine, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Atarax, Angioedema, Fexofenadine, Chlorpheniramine, Periactin, Cyproheptadine, Xyzal, Anaphylaxis

Health Tip: Pollen Isn't the Only Allergen

Posted 13 May 2015 by Drugs.com

-- Pollen from weeds, grasses and trees are common culprits for seasonal allergies, but don't forget about other things that can trigger a case of the sneezes. The American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology says other possible allergens could include: Smoke from fires, whether indoor fireplaces during winter or outdoor bonfires during summer. Insect stings and bites. Chlorine used in pools. Ingredients in food and candy. Wreaths and pine trees used as holiday decorations. Read more

Related support groups: Allergies, Allergic Reactions, Smoking, Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Allegra, Phenergan, Diphenhydramine, Loratadine, Allergic Rhinitis, Vistaril, Hay Fever, Cetirizine, Atarax, Angioedema, Fexofenadine, Chlorpheniramine

Peanut Allergy Exposure Occurs Most Often at Home, Study Says

Posted 11 May 2015 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 11, 2015 – For children with peanut allergies, home is more dangerous than school, researchers say. The Canadian study also found schools that ban peanut products are not less likely to have an accidental exposure occur than schools that don't have these policies in place. "Our study looked at 1,941 children who had been diagnosed as being allergic to peanuts to determine how exposure occurs, how serious the outcomes of the exposure are, and what treatment is given," said the study's first author, Sabrine Cherkaoui, of the University of Montreal. "We discovered that children are most at risk of exposure in their own homes. Furthermore, when children do have a moderate or severe reaction to an exposure, parents and medical professionals often do not know how to react appropriately," Cherkaoui said in a university news release. The children were nearly 7 years old on average ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergies, Allergic Reactions, Benadryl, Promethazine, Hydroxyzine, Zyrtec, Claritin, Allegra, Phenergan, Diphenhydramine, Loratadine, Vistaril, Cetirizine, Atarax, Fexofenadine, Chlorpheniramine, Epinephrine, Periactin, Cyproheptadine, Xyzal

Poison Ivy, Oak and Sumac Rashes Can Be Serious

Posted 23 Apr 2015 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, April 23, 2015 – Itchy, blistering rashes from poison ivy, oak and sumac are common and are caused by an oil in the plants called urushiol. Usually, you can deal with these rashes at home, the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) says. But you should go to the emergency room immediately if you have any of the following symptoms: Trouble breathing or swallowing, The rash covers most of your body, you have many rashes or blisters, or the rash develops anywhere on your face or genitals, You develop swelling, especially if an eyelid swells shut, Much of your skin itches, or nothing eases the itch. If you don't have any of these symptoms, you can probably treat the rash at home, according to the AAD. If you know you've touched poison ivy, poison oak or poison sumac, immediately rinse your skin with lukewarm, soapy water. This may remove some of the oil from the plants. ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergies, Allergic Reactions, Hives, Angioedema, Urticaria, Anaphylaxis, Allergic Urticaria

Many People Misuse Devices for Asthma, Allergic Reaction

Posted 18 Dec 2014 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Dec. 18, 2014 – Few people know how to properly use the medical devices that contain lifesaving medications for severe allergic reactions and asthma attacks, a new study shows. Just 16 percent knew the correct way to use an epinephrine injector for someone with a life-threatening allergy. And only 7 percent knew how to use an asthma inhaler as directed. "This isn't a new concern. We always worry about our patients, especially those with food allergies," said one of the study's authors, Dr. Aasia Ghazi, from the Allergy and Asthma Specialists of Dallas. "We had a patient call in the middle of a reaction, and she didn't remember how to use the epinephrine injector. That's why we looked to see what's going on, and what are the barriers that keep patients from using these devices properly?" Ghazi explained. The study was published online Dec. 18 in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergies, Asthma, Epinephrine, Anaphylaxis, EpiPen, Primatene Mist, Adrenalin, Primatene Mist Inhaler, EpiPen 2-Pak, EpiPen Jr, Asthmahaler, EpiPen JR 2-Pak, Bronitin, Medihaler-Epi, Epi EZ Pen, Auvi-Q, Ana-Guard, Twinject, Bronchial Mist with Pump, EpiPen JR Auto-Injector

Experts Urge Quick Use of Epinephrine for Severe Allergic Reactions

Posted 2 Dec 2014 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Dec. 2, 2014 – People having a severe allergic reaction need immediate treatment with the medication epinephrine, newly released guidelines say. But, not all medical personnel are aware of the importance of epinephrine, according to the guideline authors. A severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) caused by food, latex or an insect sting can lead to throat swelling, breathing problems, heart attack and even death. Epinephrine can halt that severe allergic reaction. There is virtually no reason not to use epinephrine on people believed to be suffering a severe allergic reaction, according to the guidelines from the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI). "Since emergency department physicians are often the first to see patients who are suffering from anaphylaxis, it's especially important that they not only correctly diagnose the problem, but understand that ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergies, Epinephrine, Anaphylaxis, EpiPen, Primatene Mist, Adrenalin, Primatene Mist Inhaler, EpiPen 2-Pak, EpiPen Jr, Asthmahaler, EpiPen JR 2-Pak, Bronitin, Medihaler-Epi, Epi EZ Pen, Adrenaclick, Ana-Guard, Twinject, Bronchial Mist with Pump, EpiPen JR Auto-Injector, Bronkaid Mist

Schools With EpiPens Save Lives, Study Says

Posted 7 Nov 2014 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 7, 2014 – Keeping supplies of epinephrine in schools saves lives, a new study finds. Epinephrine injections are given when someone suffers a life-threatening allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) to food or an insect sting. This study found that stocked emergency epinephrine was used on 35 children and three adults who suffered anaphylaxis in Chicago Public Schools during the 2012-13 school year. The drug was administered by a school nurse in three-quarters of the cases. Sixty-three percent of the incidents occurred in elementary schools and 37 percent in high schools. The most common causes of food-related anaphylaxis were peanuts (55 percent) and fish such as salmon, tuna and flounder (13 percent). The findings were scheduled for presentation Friday at the annual meeting of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology in Atlanta. "We were surprised to see that of ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergies, Epinephrine, Anaphylaxis, EpiPen, Primatene Mist, Adrenalin, Primatene Mist Inhaler, EpiPen 2-Pak, EpiPen Jr, Asthmahaler, EpiPen JR 2-Pak, Bronitin, Medihaler-Epi, Epi EZ Pen, Adrenaclick, Ana-Guard, Twinject, Bronchial Mist with Pump, EpiPen JR Auto-Injector, Bronkaid Mist

Medicines Are Biggest Culprit in Fatal Allergic Reactions: Study

Posted 10 Oct 2014 by Drugs.com

THURSDAY, Oct. 9, 2014 – Although food allergies have garnered a lot of attention lately, a new study reports that medications are actually the biggest cause of sudden deaths related to allergy. Over a little more than a decade, nearly 60 percent of the allergy-related deaths were caused by medications, while less than 7 percent were caused by food allergies, the study found. "Medications can be dangerous," said study researcher Dr. Elina Jerschow, director of the Drug Allergy Center at Montefiore Medical Center and assistant professor of medicine at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, in New York City. While research from other countries has reported medications as a major culprit in anaphylaxis-related deaths, Jerschow said, the problem has been less defined in the United States. One reason is that there is no national registry for anaphylaxis deaths, she said. The study was ... Read more

Related support groups: Provera, Amoxicillin, Depo-Provera, Doxycycline, Metronidazole, Methotrexate, Penicillin, Clindamycin, Cephalexin, Bactrim, Azithromycin, Cipro, Lupron, Accutane, Ciprofloxacin, Levaquin, Augmentin, Flagyl, Zithromax, Medroxyprogesterone

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