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Related terms: Anaphylactic Reaction, Anaphylactic Shock, Shock, Anaphylactic

At Least 1 Full-Time Nurse Per School, Pediatric Group Recommends

Posted 12 hours ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, May 23, 2016 – Every school should have at least one full-time registered nurse, a new American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) policy statement says. "School nursing is one of the most effective ways to keep children healthy and in school and to prevent chronic absenteeism," Dr. Breena Welch Holmes, a lead author of the policy statement and chair of the AAP Council on School Health, said in an AAP news release. But school district policies about nurses may lack uniformity. And such policies often need updating, the AAP noted. In the past, the AAP supported having one school nurse for every 750 healthy students and one nurse for every 225 students who needed professional nursing assistance. But these ratios aren't enough to meet the health needs of today's students, the new policy says. "As student health needs became more complex, the school nursing role has expanded to include ... Read more

Related support groups: Diabetes, Type 2, Seizures, Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Asthma, Asthma - Maintenance, Diabetes, Type 1, Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Seizure Prevention, Asthma - Acute, Anaphylaxis, Diabetes Mellitus, Seizure Prophylaxis, Allergic Asthma, Executive Function Disorder

Giving Certain Foods Early May Cut Allergy Risk

Posted 5 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, May 18, 2016 – Doctors have long warned parents to delay introducing certain foods to babies to decrease the risk of a potential allergic reaction, but a new study suggests that strategy probably doesn't help. The study of about 1,400 children found that when babies were given peanuts, eggs or cow's milk during their first year, they were less likely to become "sensitized" to those common allergy-causing foods. Being sensitized to a food means a child tests positive on a skin test. "That doesn't necessarily mean a food allergy as such, but it indicates the child is on that pathway," said the study's senior author, Dr. Malcolm Sears. The goal is to reduce the risk of sensitization, which also reduces the risk of allergy, said Sears, a professor in the division of respirology at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. The study's lead author, Maxwell Tran, said this ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Anaphylaxis, Allergic Purpura, Oral Allergy Syndrome

Think You're Allergic to Penicillin? Maybe Not

Posted 13 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 10, 2016 – Many people who believe they're allergic to penicillin actually aren't, an allergist says. "Hypersensitivity reactions are the major problem in the use of penicillin," said Dr. Thomas Leath, an allergist with the Texas A&M College of Medicine. "Many people who report a penicillin allergy don't even know why. It could be because they had a reaction when they were very young, or because a family member had an allergic reaction and told their children not to take penicillin," he said in a university news release. People who are allergic to penicillin often have to take more expensive antibiotics that can have more side effects, Leath noted. While many people tell their doctor they are allergic to penicillin, a Mayo Clinic study found that 80 percent to 90 percent of people who list a penicillin allergy have no evidence of a true reaction and avoid the drug ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Anaphylaxis, Penicillin/procaine Penicillin

Managing Allergies, Asthma 101

Posted 3 May 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, May 3, 2016 – Teens with allergies or asthma who are heading for college later this year should begin preparing for the transition now, an expert says. "For most teens, going away to college marks their first time living independently," said Dr. David Stukus, a member of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Public Relations Committee. "In addition to moving to a new place, many must learn to manage their own schedule, diet, exercise and health. Young people may find their allergies and asthma neglected due to other, seemingly more important demands on their attention," he said in a college news release. Stukus offers tips on how teens with allergies or asthma can prepare for college in an article published May 3 in the journal Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. The first step, he said, is to meet with your allergist and: Review your asthma and/or ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Asthma, Asthma - Maintenance, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Asthma - Acute, Anaphylaxis, Allergic Asthma, Reversible Airways Disease - Maintenance, Reversible Airways Disease

Kids From Poorer Families May Have Worse Food Allergy Care

Posted 27 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, April 27, 2016 – A family's income may play a big role in the type of care a child with food allergies receives, a new study suggests. The researchers found that poorer families – those making under $50,000 a year – spent less on non-allergenic foods, medical specialists and important medications, such as lifesaving epinephrine injectors. As a result, "poor people may therefore be experiencing more food allergy reactions," said study co-author Dr. Ruchi Gupta. She's the director of the Program for Maternal and Child Health at Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. The study also found that low-income families incurred an average of $1,021 in emergency and hospital costs per year, compared to $416 for those with household incomes over $100,000. An estimated 8 percent of U.S. children have food allergies, according to background information with the study. And ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Anaphylaxis, Oral Allergy Syndrome

Health Tip: Managing Food Allergy

Posted 6 Apr 2016 by Drugs.com

-- A family member with a food allergy deserves serious attention to help protect against an allergic reaction. But does that mean you should ban the problem food? Consider these questions, courtesy of the Food Allergy Research and Education website: How have you handled accidental exposure and allergic reactions in the past? How tough would it be on all other family members if the food were not allowed at home? What ages are children living at home, and how many are there? Will banning the food affect the quality of life? How will you teach the allergic child to avoid the problem food outside the home if it's banned at home? Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Zyrtec, Hydroxyzine, Claritin, Promethazine, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Allergic Rhinitis, Phenergan, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Hay Fever, Atarax, Cyproheptadine, Fexofenadine, Periactin, Chlorpheniramine

Health Tip: Managing a Food Allergy at Work

Posted 31 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Office lunches are a good opportunity to socialize with co-workers. But you should take precautions if you have a food allergy. The Food Allergy Research and Education website offers this advice: Suggest a list of restaurants you're familiar with. Offer to book the meeting yourself, so you can speak with the restaurant manager. If a restaurant can't meet your needs, don't be too shy to make an alternate suggestion. Suggest a coffee break, instead of a full meal. Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Anaphylaxis

An Expert's Guide to Sneezin' Season

Posted 16 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, March 16, 2016 – This could be a bad spring allergy season and people with allergies need to be prepared, an expert warns. "With the crazy up and down weather, some parts of the country could see worse allergy-provoking conditions. There is likely to be a pollen superburst this season, so sufferers should get ready," Dr. Jordan Josephson, a sinus specialist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, said in a hospital news release. "It promises to be a nasty spring," he added. It's crucial to deal with allergy symptoms immediately, according to Josephson. "Allergies left untreated can cause sinus swelling leading to chronic sinusitis. Allergies can also affect your digestive tract. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can be a direct response of the allergic response. So allergies can seriously affect your quality of life. Just ask any allergy or sinus sufferer," he said. ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Benadryl, Zyrtec, Hydroxyzine, Claritin, Promethazine, Allegra, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Cold Symptoms, Phenergan, Allergic Rhinitis, Cetirizine, Vistaril, Hay Fever, Atarax, Flonase, Cyproheptadine, Fexofenadine

Special Infant Formulas Don't Shield Against Asthma, Allergies: Study

Posted 9 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, March 8, 2016 – Many parents who worry that their baby is at risk of asthma, allergies or type 1 diabetes may turn to special cow's milk formulas touted to lower the risk. But a new review of the data on these "hydrolyzed" infant formulas finds no good evidence that they actually protect children from the autoimmune disorders. "We found no consistent evidence to support a protective role for partially or extensively hydrolyzed formula," concluded a team led by Robert Boyle of Imperial College London in England. "Our findings conflict with current international guidelines, in which hydrolyzed formula is widely recommended for young formula-fed infants with a family history of allergic disease," the study authors added. One expert in the United States said the finding casts doubt on the usefulness of these special formula products. "Allergies and autoimmune diseases [such as ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Asthma, Asthma - Maintenance, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Asthma - Acute, Anaphylaxis, Allergic Asthma, Reversible Airways Disease - Maintenance, Reversible Airways Disease, Allergic Purpura

Poverty Linked to Asthma, Allergy Treatment Failure

Posted 8 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, March 7, 2016 – People with asthma or food allergies who are poor have worse treatment outcomes, two new studies suggest. "We found that patients who have asthma and come from lower income households – making less than $50,000 every year – are one and a half times more likely to see treatment fail. They are also almost twice as likely to have an asthma exacerbation," study co-author Dr. Juan Carlos Cardet said in a news release from the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI). Cardet, who is from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, and his research team surveyed nearly 400 people with asthma. They found that lower income was strongly linked with poor treatment outcomes, regardless of race, stress and education levels. "Income is an independent risk factor for worse asthma outcomes," Cardet said. But the study did not show a cause-and-effect relationship ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Asthma, Asthma - Maintenance, Asthma - Acute, Anaphylaxis, Allergic Asthma, Reversible Airways Disease - Maintenance, Reversible Airways Disease

Supervised Exposure Therapy for Peanut Allergy Lasts, Study Finds

Posted 4 Mar 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, March 4, 2016 – Once a tolerance to peanuts has developed in kids considered at high-risk for developing a peanut allergy, it seems to last, new research suggests. The children in the study developed a tolerance after they were fed peanuts for years as part of a supervised clinical trial. Now, the researchers are reporting that those youngsters maintained their tolerance for at least a year, even if they didn't keep eating peanuts. "The therapy persisted, and after 12 months of avoidance there was no increase in the rates of peanut allergy. They maintained their ability to tolerate peanuts, even though they hadn't been eating it," said Dr. Sherry Farzan, an allergist with Northwell Health in Great Neck, N.Y. Farzan wasn't involved in the research. This suggests that the immune system "learns" that peanut is not a threat to the body, and kids won't have to keep eating peanuts ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Angioedema, Anaphylaxis

Allergy Shots Still Effective for Seniors

Posted 9 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Feb. 9, 2016 – Allergy shots can still benefit seniors with allergies, a new study suggests. The study included 60 people with hay fever between the ages of 65 and 75 who were given either allergy shots or a placebo for three years. Those who received the allergy shots had a 55 percent reduction in symptoms and a 64 percent decrease in their use of allergy relief medication, according to the study results. They were published Feb. 9 in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. The researchers, led by Dr. Andrzej Bozek of Medical University of Silesia in Katowice, Poland, said diagnosis and management of hay fever in seniors can be challenging because they tend to have other health conditions. The researchers added that their findings show that an aging immune system doesn't significantly reduce the effectiveness of allergy shots. While allergy shots are known to benefit ... Read more

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Allergies, Asthma Tied to Lower Risk of Brain Cancer

Posted 5 Feb 2016 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Feb. 5, 2016 – People with respiratory allergies, asthma and the skin condition eczema may be less likely to develop glioma brain cancer, a new study suggests. The international team of researchers looked at more than 4,500 glioma patients and almost 4,200 people without brain cancer. The investigators found that a history of respiratory allergies, asthma and eczema was associated with a reduced risk for glioma. People with respiratory allergies or eczema were 30 percent less likely to develop the deadly brain cancer than those without such conditions, the study found. Although the study found an association between allergic conditions and a lower risk of gliomas, it wasn't designed to prove a cause-and-effect relationship between those factors. The study was released online Feb. 5 in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention. "Many other studies have shown this ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Asthma, Asthma - Maintenance, Eczema, Allergic Rhinitis, Hay Fever, Brain Tumor, Asthma - Acute, Anaphylaxis, Glioblastoma Multiforme, Head and Neck Cancer, Allergic Asthma, Malignant Glioma, Head Imaging

Parents Often Ill-Informed About Food-Allergy Emergencies

Posted 26 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 26, 2016 – Many parents of children with food allergies say doctors did not discuss emergency care for their youngsters, a new study finds. It's crucial that parents have a written emergency plan for home and school, the study authors said. "This is potentially lifesaving information," study author Dr. Ruchi Gupta, an associate professor in pediatrics at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, said in a university news release. "Physicians need to make sure patients understand when and how to use epinephrine and that they have an emergency action plan," she added. Gupta's team surveyed 859 Chicago-area parents of children with food allergies. Less than 70 percent said their child's allergist explained when to use epinephrine, and less than 40 percent said their child's pediatrician did so, the study found. Even fewer parents said they were shown ... Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Angioedema, Anaphylaxis

Health Tip: Dining Out With Food Allergies

Posted 21 Jan 2016 by Drugs.com

-- Restaurants aren't off-limits if you have a severe food allergy, but you should plan ahead to make sure you stay safe. The Food Allergy Research and Education website advises: Call the restaurant and speak with the chef about which menu items are safe choices. Plan your meal times within the first hour of meal service, so the restaurant is less busy and the staff more alert. Bring a chef card that explains your allergies. Always bring an epinephrine pen, a medical ID bracelet and any medications you may need. Ask around for allergy-friendly restaurants, or opt for a chain restaurant that is allergy-aware and likely has the same menu at any location. Read more

Related support groups: Allergic Reactions, Allergies, Epinephrine, Anaphylaxis, EpiPen, Adrenalin, Primatene Mist, Septocaine, EpiPen 2-Pak, EpiPen Jr, Bupivacaine/Epinephrine, Articaine/Epinephrine, Primatene Mist Inhaler, Epinephrine/Lidocaine, Duranest-MPF-Epinephrine, LidoSite, Zorcaine, Ana-Guard, Raphon, Epinephrine/Prilocaine

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