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Alzheimer's Disease Blog

Related terms: Presenile Dementia, SDAT, Senile dementia Alzheimer's Type, Alzheimers

Health Tip: Make Home Safer for Alzheimer's

Posted 8 days ago by Drugs.com

-- People with Alzheimer's disease may wander or forget how to use household appliances such as a stove, making home a more dangerous place. The Alzheimer's Association discusses how to make home safer: Install Dutch doors or folding doors to limit access to areas such as the kitchen. Post a list of emergency contacts, including phone numbers of local hospital, police and fire departments, and the poison-control hotline. Inspect devices such as smoke detectors, carbon monoxide detectors and fire extinguishers to make sure they are working properly. Remove any firearms from the home, and keep medications out of the person's reach. Reduce tripping hazards by providing plenty of lighting and picking up clutter. Set the water heater temperature lower to avoid burns. Read more

Related support groups: Alzheimer's Disease

Alzheimer's Cases Expected to Double by 2050, Researchers Say

Posted 11 days ago by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 14, 2014 – The number of people with Alzheimer's disease in the United States will more than double by 2050 – a trend driven by the aging baby boomer population, a new study predicts. The cost of caring for these Alzheimer's patients will climb from $307 billion to $1.5 trillion a year by 2050, the researchers estimated. They believe that, 35 years from now, the average annual per-patient cost of the disease will be double that of the $71,000-a-year cost in 2010. "It is so expensive because individuals with Alzheimer's disease need extensive help with daily activities provided by paid caregivers or by family members who may be taking time off of work to care for them, which has a double impact on the economy," study lead author Julie Zissimopoulos, an assistant professor at the School of Public Policy at the University of Southern California, said in a university news ... Read more

Related support groups: Alzheimer's Disease

Is Tau the 'How' Behind Alzheimer's?

Posted 31 Oct 2014 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 31, 2014 – Malfunction of a key brain protein called tau is the likely culprit behind Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia, a new study in mice concludes. Neurons – highly specialized nerve cells in the brain – appear to die when tau malfunctions and fails to clear the cells of unwanted and toxic proteins, explained Charbel Moussa, head of the Laboratory for Dementia and Parkinsonism at Georgetown University School of Medicine, in Washington, D.C. This means drugs that replace the function of tau in these brain cells are likely to slow the progression of Alzheimer's, he said. "A strategy like this will give us hope that we can delay or stabilize the disease progression," Moussa said. Tau has long been a prime suspect in the search for the cause of Alzheimer's disease. The brains of Alzheimer's patients wind up clogged with twisted protein threads made of tau, ... Read more

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Studies Link Cold Sore Virus to Alzheimer's Risk

Posted 24 Oct 2014 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 24, 2014 – The virus that causes common cold sores – herpes simplex – might increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease, two studies by Swedish researchers suggest. In fact, being a carrier of certain antibodies to the virus can double the risk of Alzheimer's disease, the researchers found. "The identification of a treatable cause [herpes simplex] of the most common dementia disorder is a breakthrough," said lead researcher Dr. Hugo Lovheim, an associate professor in the department of community medicine and rehabilitation at Umea University in Sweden. "Whether treatment of herpes infection with antiviral drugs may slow the Alzheimer's progression is not known, but is certainly worth investigating in clinical studies," he said. But others aren't so sure that there's a clear cause and effect relationship between herpes simplex and Alzheimer's disease. Dr. Sam Gandy, director ... Read more

Related support groups: Alzheimer's Disease, Cold sores, Herpes Simplex Labialis

Scientists Inch Closer to Alzheimer's Origins

Posted 12 Oct 2014 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Oct. 12, 2014 – A laboratory study seems to support the theory that a buildup of beta-amyloid plaques in the brain is the first step in a process that leads to Alzheimer's disease. Researchers also pinpointed the important role of a particular enzyme in this process, and they believe the enzyme could offer a target for new drugs to fight Alzheimer's. The theory that accumulation of beta-amyloid plaques triggered Alzheimer's disease was first suggested in the mid-1980s. "One of the biggest questions since then has been whether beta-amyloid actually triggers the formation of the [fiber-like] tangles that kill neurons," study co-senior author Rudolph Tanzi, director of the Genetics and Aging Research Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital, explained in a hospital news release. According to the researchers, scientists have been stymied in the past by laboratory cell cultures that ... Read more

Related support groups: Alzheimer's Disease

Scientists Inch Closer to Alzheimer's Origins

Posted 12 Oct 2014 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Oct. 12, 2014 – A laboratory study seems to support the theory that a buildup of beta-amyloid plaques in the brain is the first step in a process that leads to Alzheimer's disease. Researchers also pinpointed the important role of a particular enzyme in this process, and they believe the enzyme could offer a target for new drugs to fight Alzheimer's. The theory that accumulation of beta-amyloid plaques triggered Alzheimer's disease was first suggested in the mid-1980s. "One of the biggest questions since then has been whether beta-amyloid actually triggers the formation of the [fiber-like] tangles that kill neurons," study co-senior author Rudolph Tanzi, director of the Genetics and Aging Research Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital, explained in a hospital news release. According to the researchers, scientists have been stymied in the past by laboratory cell cultures that ... Read more

Related support groups: Alzheimer's Disease

Report Claims Success Treating Alzheimer's Memory Loss

Posted 6 Oct 2014 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 6, 2014 – A researcher is reporting success in a small study of reversing memory problems associated with early stage Alzheimer's disease by using a complex program of lifestyle changes, supplements and hormones. Of the first 10 patients treated, nine reported improvements in memory within three to six months, according to Dr. Dale Bredesen, a professor of neurology at the University of California, Los Angeles, who developed the program. The full regimen involves 36 components, and is tailored to the individual, Bredesen said. In general, it involves diet changes such as eliminating simple carbohydrates and processed foods; regular exercise; stress reduction; good sleep habits; supplements like fish oil, curcumin and vitamin D; and, in some cases, hormone therapy. Writing in the September issue of the journal Aging, Bredesen describes the cases of 10 patients undergoing ... Read more

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Jealous, Moody Women May Face Higher Alzheimer's Risk, Study Says

Posted 1 Oct 2014 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 1, 2014 – Middle-aged women with a neurotic personality style and prolonged stress may have a heightened risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, new research suggests. Tracking 800 women over nearly four decades, Swedish scientists found that those who were most anxious, jealous and moody – which they defined as neurotic – and experienced long-standing stress had double the risk of developing Alzheimer's compared to women scoring lowest in these traits. "No other study has shown that [one style of] midlife personality increased the risk of Alzheimer's disease over a period of nearly 40 years," said study author Lena Johansson, a researcher at University of Gothenburg. Outside experts cautioned, however, that the study results don't prove that neuroticism triggers Alzheimer's, but they do suggest an association between the two. The study is published online Oct. 1 in ... Read more

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Emotional Life Lingers for Alzheimer's Patients, Even as Memory Fades

Posted 29 Sep 2014 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 29, 2014 – For those visiting a person with advanced Alzheimer's, the moment can be bittersweet – will the patient even remember or care that the loved one was there? Now, a new study suggests that even if people with the mind-robbing illness quickly forget a visit or other event, the emotions tied to the experience may linger. The study included 17 Alzheimer's patients who watched 20-minute clips of either happy or sad movies. Even though their memories of the films quickly faded, the patients' feelings of happiness and sadness associated with the movies lingered for up to 30 minutes, the researchers reported. The study suggests that caregivers can have a significant effect, for good or bad, on the emotional state of Alzheimer's patients. They may not remember a loved one's visit – or being abused or neglected by nursing home staff – but there is a lasting emotional ... Read more

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Not Everyone With Alzheimer's-Linked Protein Develops Dementia: Study

Posted 15 Sep 2014 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 15, 2014 – The human brain may have a way to compensate for the build-up of a destructive protein associated with Alzheimer's disease. That could help explain why some older people who have beta-amyloid deposits do not develop dementia, California researchers report. "This study provides evidence that there is plasticity or compensation ability in the aging brain that appears to be beneficial, even in the face of beta-amyloid accumulation," said the study's principal investigator, Dr. William Jagust. He's a professor with joint appointments at University of California, Berkeley's Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute, the School of Public Health and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The study, published Sept. 14 in Nature Neuroscience, involved 22 healthy young adults and 49 older adults who showed no signs of mental decline. Using brain imaging technology, known as ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease

Anxiety Medications May Be Tied to Alzheimer's Risk

Posted 9 Sep 2014 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Sept. 9, 2014 – Older adults who habitually use sedatives for anxiety or insomnia may have a heightened risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, a new study suggests. The drugs in question are benzodiazepines, a widely prescribed group of sedatives that include lorazepam (Ativan), diazepam (Valium) and alprazolam (Xanax). Older adults commonly take the drugs for anxiety or insomnia, often long-term, according to background information in the study. That's despite the fact that guidelines call for only short-term use of the drugs, at most. In 2012, the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) put benzodiazepines on its list of drugs considered "potentially inappropriate" for seniors, because of risks like confusion, dizziness and falls. The current study isn't the first to link benzodiazepines to Alzheimer's risk, but it adds to evidence that longer-term use of the drugs – beyond ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Xanax, Anxiety and Stress, Klonopin, Clonazepam, Valium, Ativan, Alprazolam, Lorazepam, Diazepam, Temazepam, Alzheimer's Disease, Restoril, Xanax XR, Librium, Oxazepam, Halcion, Serax, Midazolam, Triazolam

Researchers Pinpoint Brain Region Where Contextual Memories Are Made

Posted 12 Aug 2014 by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Aug. 12, 2014 – A region of the brain that plays a key role in contextual memories has been pinpointed in rats by researchers. Alzheimer's disease and other brain disorders can affect contextual memory. Contextual memories help you recall your location when an event occurred. This can range from remembering where you were at the time of a significant incident – such as 9/11 or the JFK assassination – to everyday activities such as recalling where you parked your car. It was known that a specific network of brain regions is important for contextual memory, but the importance of different parts of the network was unclear. Dartmouth College researchers conducted experiments with rats and concluded that a brain region called the retrosplenial cortex is crucial to contextual memory, according to the study in the Aug. 12 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. "By providing new ... Read more

Related support groups: Alzheimer's Disease

Man's Rare Condition May Open Door to New Alzheimer's Treatments

Posted 11 Aug 2014 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Aug. 11, 2014 – A man with a rare disease has shown scientists that there might be a different way to try to halt the devastating damage of Alzheimer's disease. A mutation of the apolipoprotein E gene (apoE4) has been shown to raise the chances of developing the memory-robbing condition, and experts have wondered how dangerous it would be to treat the patients by eliminating the protein from the brain. Now, researchers report, the answer might lie in the unusual case of an ill man whose body doesn't produce the protein at all. While the man has a variety of medical problems linked to a rare disease, his lack of the protein doesn't appear to have hurt his brain. That medical fact might mean that lowering levels of the protein in the brain "may provide a wholly new venue for intervention in Alzheimer's disease. Our observations on this patient suggest that this strategy may now ... Read more

Related support groups: Alzheimer's Disease

Low Vitamin D Levels May Boost Alzheimer's Risk, Study Finds

Posted 6 Aug 2014 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 6, 2014 – Older adults with too little vitamin D in their blood may have twice the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease as seniors with sufficient levels of the "sunshine vitamin," a new study finds. The research – based on more than 1,600 adults over age 65 – found the risk for Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia increased with the severity of vitamin D deficiency. But the findings aren't enough to recommend seniors take vitamin D supplements to prevent mental decline. "Clinical trials are now urgently needed in this area," said study researcher David Llewellyn, a senior research fellow in clinical epidemiology at the University of Exeter Medical School in England. Another expert agreed. "This shows you there is a link between vitamin D and the development of Alzheimer's," said Keith Fargo, director of scientific programs and outreach for the Alzheimer's ... Read more

Related support groups: Alzheimer's Disease, Vitamin D Deficiency, Vitamin D Insufficiency

Vitamin B No Help for Alzheimer's: Review

Posted 16 Jul 2014 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, July 16, 2014 – Taking B vitamins does not slow age-related mental decline or prevent Alzheimer's disease, a new review says. People with Alzheimer's have high blood levels of a compound called homocysteine, and people with elevated levels of the compound have been shown to be at higher risk for Alzheimer's. It's known that folic acid (vitamin B-9) and vitamin B-12 lower homocysteine levels, so it was believed that taking B vitamins may lower a person's risk of Alzheimer's. However, this review, published recently in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, revealed different results. "It would have been very nice to have found something different," study leader Dr. Robert Clarke, of Oxford University in England, said in a university news release. "Our study draws a line under the debate: B vitamins don't reduce cognitive decline as we age. Taking folic acid and vitamin ... Read more

Related support groups: Alzheimer's Disease, Vitamin B12, Cyanocobalamin, Vitamin B-12, Hydroxocobalamin, B-12 Dots, Cyanokit, Cobal 1000, Sytobex, Depo-Cobolin, Rubesol-1000, Cobolin-M, Vita 12, Hydroxy-Cobal, Crystamine, Nascobal, B-12 Resin, Cyanoject, CaloMist, Neuroforte-R

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