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Alzheimer's Disease Blog

Related terms: Presenile Dementia, SDAT, Senile dementia Alzheimer's Type, Alzheimers

Use of Certain Allergy, Depression Meds Tied to Higher Odds for Dementia

Posted 4 days ago by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Jan. 26, 2015 – Long-term and/or high-dose use of a class of medications used for hay fever, depression and other ills has been linked in a new study to a higher risk of dementia. The drugs – called anticholinergics – include nonprescription diphenhydramine (Benadryl) and tricyclic antidepressants like doxepin (Sinequan). This class of medications also includes older antihistamines like chlorpheniramine (Chlor-Trimeton) and "antimuscarinic" drugs for bladder control, such as oxybutynin (Ditropan). However, the study could only point to an association between long-term or high-dose use of these drugs and a higher risk of dementia, it could not prove cause-and-effect. Also, the relationship "did not occur at the lowest dosage range but did occur at higher dosages used long-term," said one expert, Dr. Alan Manevitz, a clinical psychiatrist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York ... Read more

Related support groups: Prozac, Celexa, Citalopram, Fluoxetine, Benadryl, Dementia, Claritin, Loratadine, Diphenhydramine, Alzheimer's Disease, Oxybutynin, Doxepin, Chlorpheniramine, Ditropan, Oxytrol, Silenor, Benadryl Allergy, Sarafem, Sinequan, Chlor-Trimeton

Leaks in Brain May Contribute to Dementia

Posted 9 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 21, 2015 – Age-related blood vessel leaks in the brain may contribute to the development of Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia, according to a new study. The findings suggest it may be possible to use brain scans to detect such leaks and repair them in order to prevent damage that can lead to dementia, the University of Southern California researchers said. The investigators analyzed contrast-enhanced brain images from 64 people of various ages and found that the brain's protective blood barrier becomes leaky with age. This leakage begins in the hippocampus, an important learning and memory center damaged by Alzheimer's disease. "This is a significant step in understanding how the vascular system affects the health of our brains," said lead investigator Dr. Berislav Zlokovic, director of the Zilkha Neurogenetic Institute at the university's Keck School of ... Read more

Related support groups: Dementia, Alzheimer's Disease

Depression, Anxiety Can Precede Memory Loss in Alzheimer's, Study Finds

Posted 16 days ago by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 14, 2015 – Depression, sleep problems and behavioral changes can show up before signs of memory loss in people who go on to develop Alzheimer's disease, a new study suggests. "I wouldn't worry at this point if you're feeling anxious, depressed or tired that you have underlying Alzheimer's, because in most cases it has nothing to do with an underlying Alzheimer's process," said study author Catherine Roe, an assistant professor of neurology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. "We're just trying to get a better idea of what Alzheimer's looks like before people are even diagnosed with dementia," Roe added. "We're becoming more interested in symptoms occurring with Alzheimer's, but not what people typically think of." Tracking more than 2,400 middle-aged people for up to seven years, the researchers found that those who developed dementia were more ... Read more

Related support groups: Anxiety, Depression, Alzheimer's Disease

Spending on Medical Research Falls in U.S. While Growing Globally

Posted 17 days ago by Drugs.com

TUESDAY, Jan. 13, 2015 – Spending on medical research is waning in the United States, and this trend could have dire consequences for patients, physicians and the health care industry as a whole, a new analysis reveals. America is losing ground to Asia, the research shows. And if left unaddressed, this decline in spending could rob the world of cures and treatments for Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, depression and other conditions that plague the human race, said lead author Dr. Hamilton Moses III, founder and chairman of the Alerion Institute, a Virginia-based think tank. Moses noted that a great expansion in medical research that began in the 1980s helped revolutionize cancer prevention and treatment, and turned HIV/AIDS from a fatal illness to a chronic condition. But between 2004 and 2012, the rate of investment growth declined to 0.8 percent a year in the United States, compared ... Read more

Related support groups: Depression, Diabetes, Type 2, Alzheimer's Disease

Actavis and Adamas Announce FDA Approval of Namzaric (memantine/donepezil) for Alzheimer's Disease

Posted 24 Dec 2014 by Drugs.com

DUBLIN and EMERYVILLE, Calif., Dec. 24, 2014 /PRNewswire/ – Actavis plc (NYSE: ACT) and Adamas Pharmaceuticals Inc. (NASDAQ: ADMS) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the New Drug Application (NDA) for Namzaric, a fixed-dose combination (FDC) of memantine hydrochloride extended-release, a NMDA receptor antagonist, and donepezil hydrochloride, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor. Namzaric was approved for the treatment of moderate to severe dementia of the Alzheimer's type in patients stabilized on memantine hydrochloride and donepezil hydrochloride. "Namzaric combines, in one capsule, two complementary therapeutic agents which are often co-prescribed as approximately 70% of Namenda XR patients are also on AChEI therapy. Both Namenda XR and donepezil have proven efficacy and safety, for the treatment of moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease. ... Read more

Related support groups: Alzheimer's Disease

Study Links Running to Lower Alzheimer's Death Risk

Posted 3 Dec 2014 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Dec. 3, 2014 – Running more than 15 miles a week may reduce the risk of dying from Alzheimer's disease, new research suggests. Walking can help, too, if the amount of energy expended is equivalent to running more than 15 miles weekly, the study found. "Exercise seems to prevent the shrinkage [in the brain] that occurs with age," said study researcher Paul Williams, a staff scientist at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in Berkeley, Calif. And preserving brain volume may be why vigorous exercise helps reduce the risk of Alzheimer's death, according to Williams. Williams' study also found that taking cholesterol-lowering drugs known as statins was linked to reduced risk of death from Alzheimer's disease, as did eating three or more pieces of fruit daily. However, this study was only able to find associations between all of these factors and the risk of death from Alzheimer's ... Read more

Related support groups: Alzheimer's Disease

Health Tip: Make Home Safer for Alzheimer's

Posted 19 Nov 2014 by Drugs.com

-- People with Alzheimer's disease may wander or forget how to use household appliances such as a stove, making home a more dangerous place. The Alzheimer's Association discusses how to make home safer: Install Dutch doors or folding doors to limit access to areas such as the kitchen. Post a list of emergency contacts, including phone numbers of local hospital, police and fire departments, and the poison-control hotline. Inspect devices such as smoke detectors, carbon monoxide detectors and fire extinguishers to make sure they are working properly. Remove any firearms from the home, and keep medications out of the person's reach. Reduce tripping hazards by providing plenty of lighting and picking up clutter. Set the water heater temperature lower to avoid burns. Read more

Related support groups: Alzheimer's Disease

Alzheimer's Cases Expected to Double by 2050, Researchers Say

Posted 16 Nov 2014 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Nov. 14, 2014 – The number of people with Alzheimer's disease in the United States will more than double by 2050 – a trend driven by the aging baby boomer population, a new study predicts. The cost of caring for these Alzheimer's patients will climb from $307 billion to $1.5 trillion a year by 2050, the researchers estimated. They believe that, 35 years from now, the average annual per-patient cost of the disease will be double that of the $71,000-a-year cost in 2010. "It is so expensive because individuals with Alzheimer's disease need extensive help with daily activities provided by paid caregivers or by family members who may be taking time off of work to care for them, which has a double impact on the economy," study lead author Julie Zissimopoulos, an assistant professor at the School of Public Policy at the University of Southern California, said in a university news ... Read more

Related support groups: Alzheimer's Disease

Is Tau the 'How' Behind Alzheimer's?

Posted 31 Oct 2014 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 31, 2014 – Malfunction of a key brain protein called tau is the likely culprit behind Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia, a new study in mice concludes. Neurons – highly specialized nerve cells in the brain – appear to die when tau malfunctions and fails to clear the cells of unwanted and toxic proteins, explained Charbel Moussa, head of the Laboratory for Dementia and Parkinsonism at Georgetown University School of Medicine, in Washington, D.C. This means drugs that replace the function of tau in these brain cells are likely to slow the progression of Alzheimer's, he said. "A strategy like this will give us hope that we can delay or stabilize the disease progression," Moussa said. Tau has long been a prime suspect in the search for the cause of Alzheimer's disease. The brains of Alzheimer's patients wind up clogged with twisted protein threads made of tau, ... Read more

Related support groups: Alzheimer's Disease

Studies Link Cold Sore Virus to Alzheimer's Risk

Posted 24 Oct 2014 by Drugs.com

FRIDAY, Oct. 24, 2014 – The virus that causes common cold sores – herpes simplex – might increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease, two studies by Swedish researchers suggest. In fact, being a carrier of certain antibodies to the virus can double the risk of Alzheimer's disease, the researchers found. "The identification of a treatable cause [herpes simplex] of the most common dementia disorder is a breakthrough," said lead researcher Dr. Hugo Lovheim, an associate professor in the department of community medicine and rehabilitation at Umea University in Sweden. "Whether treatment of herpes infection with antiviral drugs may slow the Alzheimer's progression is not known, but is certainly worth investigating in clinical studies," he said. But others aren't so sure that there's a clear cause and effect relationship between herpes simplex and Alzheimer's disease. Dr. Sam Gandy, director ... Read more

Related support groups: Alzheimer's Disease, Cold sores, Herpes Simplex Labialis

Scientists Inch Closer to Alzheimer's Origins

Posted 12 Oct 2014 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Oct. 12, 2014 – A laboratory study seems to support the theory that a buildup of beta-amyloid plaques in the brain is the first step in a process that leads to Alzheimer's disease. Researchers also pinpointed the important role of a particular enzyme in this process, and they believe the enzyme could offer a target for new drugs to fight Alzheimer's. The theory that accumulation of beta-amyloid plaques triggered Alzheimer's disease was first suggested in the mid-1980s. "One of the biggest questions since then has been whether beta-amyloid actually triggers the formation of the [fiber-like] tangles that kill neurons," study co-senior author Rudolph Tanzi, director of the Genetics and Aging Research Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital, explained in a hospital news release. According to the researchers, scientists have been stymied in the past by laboratory cell cultures that ... Read more

Related support groups: Alzheimer's Disease

Scientists Inch Closer to Alzheimer's Origins

Posted 12 Oct 2014 by Drugs.com

SUNDAY, Oct. 12, 2014 – A laboratory study seems to support the theory that a buildup of beta-amyloid plaques in the brain is the first step in a process that leads to Alzheimer's disease. Researchers also pinpointed the important role of a particular enzyme in this process, and they believe the enzyme could offer a target for new drugs to fight Alzheimer's. The theory that accumulation of beta-amyloid plaques triggered Alzheimer's disease was first suggested in the mid-1980s. "One of the biggest questions since then has been whether beta-amyloid actually triggers the formation of the [fiber-like] tangles that kill neurons," study co-senior author Rudolph Tanzi, director of the Genetics and Aging Research Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital, explained in a hospital news release. According to the researchers, scientists have been stymied in the past by laboratory cell cultures that ... Read more

Related support groups: Alzheimer's Disease

Report Claims Success Treating Alzheimer's Memory Loss

Posted 6 Oct 2014 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Oct. 6, 2014 – A researcher is reporting success in a small study of reversing memory problems associated with early stage Alzheimer's disease by using a complex program of lifestyle changes, supplements and hormones. Of the first 10 patients treated, nine reported improvements in memory within three to six months, according to Dr. Dale Bredesen, a professor of neurology at the University of California, Los Angeles, who developed the program. The full regimen involves 36 components, and is tailored to the individual, Bredesen said. In general, it involves diet changes such as eliminating simple carbohydrates and processed foods; regular exercise; stress reduction; good sleep habits; supplements like fish oil, curcumin and vitamin D; and, in some cases, hormone therapy. Writing in the September issue of the journal Aging, Bredesen describes the cases of 10 patients undergoing ... Read more

Related support groups: Alzheimer's Disease

Jealous, Moody Women May Face Higher Alzheimer's Risk, Study Says

Posted 1 Oct 2014 by Drugs.com

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 1, 2014 – Middle-aged women with a neurotic personality style and prolonged stress may have a heightened risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, new research suggests. Tracking 800 women over nearly four decades, Swedish scientists found that those who were most anxious, jealous and moody – which they defined as neurotic – and experienced long-standing stress had double the risk of developing Alzheimer's compared to women scoring lowest in these traits. "No other study has shown that [one style of] midlife personality increased the risk of Alzheimer's disease over a period of nearly 40 years," said study author Lena Johansson, a researcher at University of Gothenburg. Outside experts cautioned, however, that the study results don't prove that neuroticism triggers Alzheimer's, but they do suggest an association between the two. The study is published online Oct. 1 in ... Read more

Related support groups: Alzheimer's Disease

Emotional Life Lingers for Alzheimer's Patients, Even as Memory Fades

Posted 29 Sep 2014 by Drugs.com

MONDAY, Sept. 29, 2014 – For those visiting a person with advanced Alzheimer's, the moment can be bittersweet – will the patient even remember or care that the loved one was there? Now, a new study suggests that even if people with the mind-robbing illness quickly forget a visit or other event, the emotions tied to the experience may linger. The study included 17 Alzheimer's patients who watched 20-minute clips of either happy or sad movies. Even though their memories of the films quickly faded, the patients' feelings of happiness and sadness associated with the movies lingered for up to 30 minutes, the researchers reported. The study suggests that caregivers can have a significant effect, for good or bad, on the emotional state of Alzheimer's patients. They may not remember a loved one's visit – or being abused or neglected by nursing home staff – but there is a lasting emotional ... Read more

Related support groups: Alzheimer's Disease

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