Tabloid Side Effects

Generic Name: thioguanine

Note: This page contains side effects data for the generic drug thioguanine. It is possible that some of the dosage forms included below may not apply to the brand name Tabloid.

It is possible that some side effects of Tabloid may not have been reported. These can be reported to the FDA here. Always consult a healthcare professional for medical advice.

For the Consumer

Applies to thioguanine: oral tablet

Along with their needed effects, medicines like thioguanine (the active ingredient contained in Tabloid) can sometimes cause unwanted effects such as blood problems and other side effects. These and others are described below. Also, because of the way these medicines act on the body, there is a chance that they might cause other unwanted effects that may not occur until months or years after the medicine is used. These delayed effects may include certain types of cancer, such as leukemia. Discuss these possible effects with your doctor.

Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

If any of the following side effects occur while taking thioguanine, check with your doctor immediately:

More common
  • Black, tarry stools
  • blood in urine or stools
  • cough or hoarseness
  • fever or chills
  • lower back or side pain
  • painful or difficult urination
  • pinpoint red spots on skin
  • unusual bleeding or bruising

If any of the following side effects occur while taking thioguanine, check with your doctor or nurse as soon as possible:

Less common
  • Joint pain
  • swelling of feet or lower legs
  • unsteadiness when walking
Rare
  • Sores in mouth and on lips
  • yellow eyes or skin
Frequency not determined
  • Abdominal or stomach pain
  • bloated abdomen
  • chest pain or discomfort
  • cough or hoarseness
  • coughing up blood
  • dark urine
  • dizziness
  • fainting
  • fatigue
  • headache
  • hives
  • itching
  • light-colored stools
  • loss of appetite
  • lower back or side pain
  • nausea
  • pain and fullness in right upper abdomen
  • pale skin
  • purple- or red-colored spots on body or inside the mouth or nose
  • rash
  • shortness of breath
  • sore throat
  • swollen glands
  • unpleasant breath odor
  • unusual tiredness or weakness
  • vomiting
  • vomiting of blood
  • weight gain

Some thioguanine side effects may not need any medical attention. As your body gets used to the medicine these side effects may disappear. Your health care professional may be able to help you prevent or reduce these side effects, but do check with them if any of the following side effects continue, or if you are concerned about them:

Less common
  • Diarrhea
  • loss of appetite
  • nausea and vomiting
  • skin rash or itching

After you stop taking this drug, it is possible that you may still experience side effects that need medical attention. If you notice any of the following side effects check with your doctor immediately:

  • Black, tarry stools
  • blood in urine or stools
  • cough or hoarseness
  • fever or chills
  • lower back or side pain
  • painful or difficult urination
  • pinpoint red spots on skin
  • unusual bleeding or bruising

For Healthcare Professionals

Applies to thioguanine: oral tablet

Hematologic

Because thioguanine (the active ingredient contained in Tabloid) may have delayed effect, the drug should be withdrawn temporarily at the first sign of an abnormally large fall in any of the formed elements of the blood.

Hyperuricemia can be minimized by increased hydration, urine alkalinization, and the prophylactic administration of a xanthine oxidase inhibitor such as allopurinol.

Hematologic side effects including myelosuppression have been reported. Myelosuppression is the most frequent adverse reaction to thioguanine and may appear as anemia, leukopenia, and/or thrombocytopenia. The induction of complete remission of acute myelogenous leukemia usually requires combination chemotherapy in dosages which produce marrow hypoplasia. Since consolidation and maintenance of remission are also affected by multiple drug regimens whose component agents cause myelosuppression, pancytopenia is observed in nearly all patients.

Hyperuricemia frequently occurs in patients receiving thioguanine as a consequence of rapid cell lysis accompanying the antineoplastic effect.

Life-threatening infection and bleeding have been observed as consequences of thioguanine-induced granulocytopenia and thrombocytopenia.

Gastrointestinal

Gastrointestinal side effects including nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia, and stomatitis have been reported. Intestinal necrosis and perforation have been reported in patients who received multiple drug chemotherapy which included thioguanine (the active ingredient contained in Tabloid)

If severe diarrhea and/or stomatitis develop, a decrease in dosage may be appropriate.

Hepatic

Hepatic side effects including veno-occlusive liver disease have been reported. A case of peliosis hepatitis has been reported. Liver enzyme and other liver function studies are occasionally abnormal.

If jaundice, hepatomegaly, or anorexia with tenderness in the right hypochondrium occurs, thioguanine should be withheld until the exact etiology can be determined.

Respiratory

Respiratory side effects including esophageal varices have been reported in patients receiving continuous busulfan and thioguanine (the active ingredient contained in Tabloid) therapy. Nasal congestion and rhinorrhea have been reported with high dose IV therapy.

Renal

Renal side effects including nephrotoxicity have been reported in high-dose therapy.

Dermatologic

Dermatologic side effects including the development of painful erythematous swelling of the palms and soles occurring several days after courses of therapy, have been reported in 5 women on cytarabine, doxorubicin, and thioguanine (the active ingredient contained in Tabloid) Alopecia has also been reported.

Other

Other side effects including malaise, lethargy, weakness, ataxia, and loss of vibratory sensation have been reported.

Cardiovascular

Cardiovascular side effects have been reported. In one study, two of thirteen patients administered 700 mg/m2 intravenously developed bradycardia and nonspecific T-wave flattening, which resolved within 3 hours. In another study, five of nineteen patients administered 1000 mg/m2 intravenously demonstrated minor changes: bradycardia (two patients), nonspecific ST- and T-wave changes (five), and P-wave changes (one).

Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference resource beyond the date hereof. This material does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients, or recommend therapy. This information is a reference resource designed as supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill , knowledge, and judgement of healthcare practitioners in patient care. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate safety, effectiveness, or appropriateness for any given patient. Drugs.com does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of materials provided. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the substances you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist.

Hide
(web5)