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Betacort Side Effects

Generic Name: betamethasone topical

Note: This page contains information about the side effects of betamethasone topical. Some of the dosage forms included on this document may not apply to the brand name Betacort.

Not all side effects for Betacort may be reported. You should always consult a doctor or healthcare professional for medical advice. Side effects can be reported to the FDA here.

For the Consumer

Applies to betamethasone topical: topical application cream, topical application lotion, topical application ointment, topical application spray

In addition to its needed effects, some unwanted effects may be caused by betamethasone topical (the active ingredient contained in Betacort). In the event that any of these side effects do occur, they may require medical attention.

You should check with your doctor immediately if any of these side effects occur when taking betamethasone topical:

More common
  • Burning or stinging
Less common
  • Blistering, burning, crusting, dryness, or flaking of the skin
  • cracking or tightening of the skin
  • dry skin
  • flushing or redness of the skin
  • irritation
  • itching, scaling, severe redness, soreness, or swelling of the skin
  • thinning of the skin with easy bruising, especially when used on the face or where the skin folds together (eg, between the fingers)
  • unusually warm skin
Rare
  • Blistering, peeling, or loosening of the skin
Incidence not known
  • Redness and scaling around the mouth

Some of the side effects that can occur with betamethasone topical may not need medical attention. As your body adjusts to the medicine during treatment these side effects may go away. Your health care professional may also be able to tell you about ways to reduce or prevent some of these side effects. If any of the following side effects continue, are bothersome or if you have any questions about them, check with your health care professional:

Less common
  • Raised, dark red, or wart-like spots on the skin, especially when used on the face
Rare
  • Burning, itching, and pain in hairy areas, or pus at the root of the hair
Incidence not known
  • Acne or pimples
  • burning and itching of the skin with pinhead-sized red blisters
  • increased hair growth on the forehead, back, arms, and legs
  • lightening of normal skin color
  • lightening of treated areas of dark skin
  • reddish purple lines on the arms, face, legs, trunk, or groin
  • softening of the skin

For Healthcare Professionals

Applies to betamethasone topical: topical cream, topical foam, topical gel, topical lotion, topical ointment, topical spray

General

The most commonly reported side effects were pruritus, burning, itching, irritation.

Hypersensitivity

Rare (less than 0.1%): Hypersensitivity

Endocrine

Frequency not reported: Cushing's syndrome[Ref]

Dermatologic

Common (1% to 10%): Pruritus
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Folliculitis, skin infections (including bacterial, fungal and viral skin infections)
Frequency not reported: Dryness, hypertrichosis, acneiform eruptions, hypopigmentation, perioral dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, maceration of the skin, secondary infections, skin atrophy, striae, miliaria[Ref]

Local

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Application site pain
Frequency not reported: Burning, itching, irritation[Ref]

Ocular

Rare (less than 0.1%): Eye disorder[Ref]

Metabolic

Frequency not reported: Hyperglycemia

Renal

Frequency not reported: Glucosuria

Other

Rare (less than 0.1%): Rebound effect

References

1. "Product Information. Diprolene (betamethasone topical)." Schering Laboratories, Kenilworth, NJ.

2. Ruiz-Maldonado R, Zapata G, Lourdes T, Robles C "Cushing's syndrome after topical application of corticosteroids." Am J Dis Child 136 (1982): 274-5

3. Stevens DJ "Cushing's syndrome due to the abuse of betamethasone nasal drops." J Laryngol Otol 102 (1988): 219-21

4. Flynn MD, Beasley P, Tooke JE "Adrenal suppression with intranasal betamethasone drops." J Laryngol Otol 106 (1992): 827-8

5. Walsh P, Aeling JL, Huff L, Weston WL "Hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis suppression by superpotent topical steroids." J Am Acad Dermatol 29 (1993): 501-3

6. Salde L, Lassus A "Systemic side-effects of three topical steroids in diseased skin." Curr Med Res Opin 8 (1983): 475-80

7. Stoppoloni G, Prisco F, Santinelli R, Sicuranza G, Giordano C "Potential hazards of topical steroid therapy." Am J Dis Child 137 (1983): 1130-1

8. Reymann F, Kehlet H "Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical function. Association with topical application of betamethasone dipropionate." Arch Dermatol 115 (1979): 362-3

9. Cunliffe WJ, Burton JL, Holti G, Wright V "Hazards of steroid therapy in hepatic failure." Br J Dermatol 93 (1975): 183-5

10. Macdonald A "Topical corticosteroid preparations. Hazards and side-effects." Br J Clin Pract 25 (1971): 421-5

11. Smith EB, Breneman DL, Griffith RF, Hebert AA, Hickman JG, Maloney JM, Millikan LE, Sulica VI, Dromgoole SH, Sefton J, et al "Double-blind comparison of naftifine cream and clotrimazole/betamethasone dipropionate cream in the treatment of tinea pedis." J Am Acad Dermatol 26 (1992): 125-7

12. Hellgren L "Induction of generalized pustular psoriasis by topical use of betamethasone-dipropionate ointment in psoriasis." Ann Clin Res 8 (1976): 317-9

13. Grice K "Tinea of the hand and forearm. Betamethasone valerate atrophy." Proc R Soc Med 59 (1966): 254-5

14. Barkey WF "Striae and persistent tinea corporis related to prolonged use of betamethasone dipropionate 0.05% cream/clotrimazole 1% cream (Lotrisone cream)." J Am Acad Dermatol 17 (1987): 518-9

15. Ellis CN, Katz HI, Rex IH Jr, Shavin JS, Van Scott EJ, VanderPloeg D "A controlled clinical trial of a new formulation of betamethasone dipropionate cream in once-daily treatment of psoriasis." Clin Ther 11 (1989): 768-74

16. Sneddon I "Perioral dermatitis." Br J Dermatol 87 (1972): 430-4

17. Butcher JM, Austin M, McGalliard J, Bourke RD "Bilateral cataracts and glaucoma induced by long term use of steroid eye drops." BMJ 309 (1994): 43

18. Eisenlohr JE "Glaucoma following the prolonged use of topical steroid medication to the eyelids." J Am Acad Dermatol 8 (1983): 878-81

19. Kitazawa Y "Increased intraocular pressure induced by corticosteroids." Am J Ophthalmol 82 (1976): 492-5

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