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Vasopressin Pregnancy and Breastfeeding Warnings

Vasopressin is also known as: Pitressin, Vasostrict

Vasopressin Pregnancy Warnings

There have been several reports in which vasopressin or desmopressin (DDAVP) was used safely to treat diabetes insipidus during human pregnancy. There appears to be a decrease in the plasma concentration of vasopressin during the first and second trimesters, and a 3-fold increase in the plasma concentration of vasopressin in the last trimester and during labor. In vivo and in vitro data have shown that vasopressin and other structurally related polypeptides increase the frequency and amplitude of uterine contractions.

Vasopressin has been assigned to pregnancy category C by the FDA. Animal studies have not been reported. There are no controlled data in human pregnancy. Vasopressin is only recommended for use during pregnancy when benefit outweighs risk.

See references

Vasopressin Breastfeeding Warnings

There are no data on the excretion of vasopressin into human milk. Patients receiving vasopressin or other structurally related polypeptides have been reported to breast-feed without apparent adverse effects on the nursing infant. The manufacturer recommends that caution be used when administering vasopressin to nursing women.

See references

References for pregnancy information

  1. Polin RA, Husain MK, James LS, Frantz AG "High vasopressin concentrations in human umbilical cord blood--lack of correlation with stress." J Perinat Med 5 (1977): 114-9
  2. Johannesen P, Pedersen EB, Rasmussen AB "Arginine vasopressin in amniotic fluid, arterial and venous cord plasma and maternal venous plasma." Gynecol Obstet Invest 19 (1985): 192-5
  3. Phelan JP, Guay AT, Newman C "Diabetes insipidus in pregnancy: a case review." Am J Obstet Gynecol 130 (1978): 365-6
  4. Riad AM "Studies on the enzymatic degradation of oxytocin and vasopressin by human pregnancy sera." Acta Endocrinol (Copenh) 54 (1967): 618-28
  5. "Product Information. Pitressin (vasopressin)." Parke-Davis, Morris Plains, NJ.
  6. Parboosingh J, Lederis K, Ko D, Singh N "Vasopressin concentration in cord blood: correlation with method of delivery and cord pH." Obstet Gynecol 60 (1982): 179-83
  7. Ford SM "Transient vasopressin-resistant diabetes insipidus of pregnancy." Obstet Gynecol 68 (1986): 288-9
  8. Oravec D, Lichardus B "Management of diabetes insipidus in pregnancy." Br Med J 4 (1972): 114-5
  9. Hadi HA, Mashini IS, Devoe LD "Diabetes insipidus during pregnancy complicated by preeclampsia: a case report." J Reprod Med 30 (1985): 206-8
  10. Maigaard S, Forman A, Andersson KE "Differential effects of angiotensin, vasopressin and oxytocin on various smooth muscle tissues within the human uteroplacental unit." Acta Physiol Scand 128 (1986): 23-31
  11. Landon MJ, Copas DK, Shiells EA, Davison JM "Degradation of radiolabelled arginine vasopressin (125I-AVP) by the human placenta perfused in vitro." Br J Obstet Gynaecol 95 (1988): 488-92
  12. Hime MC, Richardson JA "Diabetes insipidus and pregnancy: case report, incidence and review of literature." Obstet Gynecol Surv 33 (1978): 375-9
  13. Briggs GG, Freeman RK, Yaffe SJ.. "Drugs in Pregnancy and Lactation. 5th ed." Baltimore, MD: Williams & Wilkins (1998):
  14. van der Wildt B, Drayer JI, Eskes TK "Diabetes insipidus in pregnancy as a first sign of a craniopharyngioma." Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol 10 (1980): 269-74
  15. Stein G, Morton J, Marsh A, Hartshorn J, Ebeling J, Desaga U "Vasopressin and mood during the puerperium." Biol Psychiatry 19 (1984): 1711-7
  16. Hughes JM, Barron WM, vance ML "Recurrent diabetes insipidus associated with pregnancy: pathophysiology and therapy." Obstet Gynecol 73 (1989): 462-4
  17. Ford SM, Lumpkin HL "Transient vasopressin-resistant diabetees insipidus of pregnancy." Obstet Gynecol 68 (1986): 726-8
  18. Gaffney PR, Jenkins DM "Vasopressin: mediator of the clinical signs of fetal distress." Br J Obstet Gynaecol 90 (1983): 987
  19. Rubens R, Thiery M "Diabetes insipidus and pregnancy." Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol 26 (1987): 265-70
  20. DeVane GW "Vasopressin levels during pregnancy and labor." J Reprod Med 30 (1985): 324-7
  21. Davison JM, Barron WM, Lindheimer MD "Metabolic clearance rates of vasopressin increase markedly in late gestation: possible cause of polyuria in pregnant women." Trans Assoc Am Physicians 100 (1987): 91-8

References for breastfeeding information

  1. Briggs GG, Freeman RK, Yaffe SJ.. "Drugs in Pregnancy and Lactation. 5th ed." Baltimore, MD: Williams & Wilkins (1998):
  2. "Product Information. Pitressin (vasopressin)." Parke-Davis, Morris Plains, NJ.
  3. Hadi HA, Mashini IS, Devoe LD "Diabetes insipidus during pregnancy complicated by preeclampsia: a case report." J Reprod Med 30 (1985): 206-8
  4. Hime MC, Richardson JA "Diabetes insipidus and pregnancy: case report, incidence and review of literature." Obstet Gynecol Surv 33 (1978): 375-9

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