Willard Water

Common Name(s): Willard's water , catalyst altered water , CAW , carbonaceous activated water , Biowater

Uses of Willard Water

Historically used as a cure-all or panacea. Dr. Willard's Water is a vehicle by which nutrients are carried throughout the body’s cells, and by which waste is carried away from the cells with water as a means of transportation. In the past, it has been used as an industrial cleanser.

Willard Water is not intended to treat, diagnose, cure, or prevent any diseases.

Willard Water Dosing

Dosages vary according to application (eg, whether product is used in humans, pets or livestock, or plants). Review manufacturer's directions before using. When using Willard Water products manufactured by CAW Industries, Inc., any diluted solutions should be refrigerated for maximum benefits; boiling or freezing does not alter the efficacy of the products.

Contraindications

Avoid use in patients with known hypersensitivity reactions to any of the Willard Water ingredients.

Pregnancy/Lactation

Information regarding safety and efficacy in pregnancy and lactation is lacking.

Willard Water Interactions

None well documented.

Willard Water Adverse Reactions

The original manufacturers of Dr. Willard's Water , CAW Industries, Inc., claim that Willard Water has been analyzed by many reputable laboratories and always has found the product to be nontoxic, nonmutagenic, and noncarcinogenic.

Toxicology

No toxicity had been reported to the FDA as of 1982, and the product has not been generally associated with significant toxicity problems.

History

Willard Water is a product with a history that dates to the early 20th century. John Wesley Willard, Ph.D., a professor of chemistry at the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology developed this product. During the 1930s, Willard patented an industrial cleanser used to degrease and clean train parts. The liquid was named “carbonaceous activated water” or “catalyst activated water.” 1

However, over the years, the product became legendary among townspeople who used Willard Water to treat practically every recognized animal and human disease. In the early 1970s, Willard distributed a product called Dr. Willard's Water XXX with lignite, which was advertised as a plant growth stimulator. In 1980, the CBS network program 60 Minutes featured Dr. Willard and the water, showing fruits and plants that had grown to many times their normal size, allegedly because of treatment with Willard Water . Thereafter, a national sales system developed, with some distributors suggesting exaggerated indications for the product, including the treatment of arthritis, acne, anxiety, nervous stomach, hypertension, ulcers, and baldness, and for food preservation, in addition to serving as a laundry aid and a treatment for bovine and feline leukemia. 1 , 2

The Willard family has acknowledged that the product does not have the capability to cure disease.

Chemistry

The formula of Willard Water appears to have changed over the decades. The FDA has found that various products contain combinations of rock salt, lignite, sodium metasilicate, sulfated castor oil, calcium chloride, and magnesium sulfate.

The original manufacturers of Dr. Willard's Water , CAW Industries, Inc., document the following recipe on their Web site: water, sodium metasilicate, sulfated castor oil, CAW micelle, refined lignite, calcium chloride, and magnesium sulfate. During Willard Water preparation, the molecular structure of water is altered by a catalyst and a “CAW micelle” is created, “making it behave in a manner that heretofore has not been reported in the literature,” as stated by Dr. Willard himself. 1 , 2

Willard Water Uses and Pharmacology

Recent literature searches find no peer-reviewed scientific studies on Willard Water . There is, however, continued interest in “genuine” Willard Water , even the incorporation of it into herbal products (ie, supplements, herbs, foods, vitamins, soaps), which claim to use the “real” or original recipe.

The reported uses of Willard Water are printed in the US Government Printing Office Committee Publication #96-240: A Briefing on Catalyst Altered Water by the Subcommittee on Health and Long Term Care of the Select Committee on Aging, U.S. House of Representatives, 96th Congress Second Session, July 7, 1980, Rapid City, South Dakota. Applications of Willard Water include the following: animal shampoo and itch reliever, fish tank purifier, injury (wound/cut/burn) healer, seed starter, prolongation of life of cut flowers, and houseplant fertilizer. Many human testimonials are also available, including the following: wound healing, alleviation of pain, dermatology application (ie, clear complexion), mild tranquilizer, hair care (ie, control frizz and dandruff), relief of sore throat, and potential antibacterial properties. Willard Water also may increase enzyme activity (eg, assimilate nutrients more efficiently) and immune system functioning. 1

Animal Data

Research reveals no animal data regarding the use of Willard Water for any condition.

Clinical Data

Research reveals no clinical data regarding the use of Willard Water for any condition.

Dosage

Dosages vary according to application (eg, whether product is used in humans, pets or livestock, or plants). Review manufacturer's directions before using. When using Willard Water products manufactured by CAW Industries, Inc., any diluted solutions should be refrigerated for maximum benefits; boiling or freezing does not alter the efficacy of the products. 1

Pregnancy/Lactation

Information regarding safety and efficacy in pregnancy and lactation is lacking.

Interactions

None well documented.

Adverse Reactions

No clinical data.

Toxicology

No toxicity had been reported to the FDA as of 1982, and the product has not been generally associated with significant toxicity problems. CAW Industries, Inc., the original manufacturers of Dr. Willard's Water , claim that Willard Water has been analyzed by many reputable laboratories and always has been found to be nontoxic, nonmutagenic, and noncarcinogenic. 1

Bibliography

1. The Official Willard Water Web site.
2. Doc Willard's Wonder Water [transcript]. 60 Minutes . CBS television. November 23, 1980. .

Copyright © 2009 Wolters Kluwer Health

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