phytonadione

Pronunciation

Generic Name: phytonadione (fye toe na DYE own)
Brand Name: Mephyton, Vitamin K, Aquamephyton, Konakion, Vitamin K1

What is phytonadione?

Phytonadione is a man-made form of vitamin K, which occurs naturally in the body.

Phytonadione is used to treat vitamin K deficiency and to treat certain bleeding or blood clotting problems.

Phytonadione may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What is the most important information I should know about phytonadione?

Phytonadione is used to treat vitamin K deficiency and to treat certain bleeding or blood clotting problems.

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Never take phytonadione in larger amounts, or for longer than recommended by your doctor.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking phytonadione?

You should not use phytonadione if you are allergic to it.

To make sure you can safely take phytonadione, tell your doctor if you have liver disease.

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether phytonadione will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medication.

It is not known whether phytonadione passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I take phytonadione?

Follow all directions on your prescription label. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results. Never take this medicine in larger amounts, or for longer than prescribed.

While using phytonadione, you may need frequent blood tests at your doctor's office.

Use phytonadione regularly to get the most benefit. Get your prescription refilled before you run out of medicine completely.

If you need surgery or dental work, tell the surgeon or dentist ahead of time that you are using phytonadione.

Store in the original container at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. Keep the container tightly closed when not in use.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking phytonadione?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.

Phytonadione side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • feeling like you might pass out;

  • blue colored lips; or

  • trouble breathing.

Common side effects may include:

  • flushing (warmth, redness, or tingly feeling);

  • changes in your sense of taste;

  • sweating; or

  • dizziness.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also: Side effects (in more detail)

Phytonadione Dosing Information

Usual Adult Dose for Hypoprothrombinemia -- Anticoagulant Induced:

Active   Rapid        
INR Bleed Reversal Therapy & Follow-Up Comment
<6 No No Omit 1 to 4 anticoagulant doses and
reduce dosage when resume therapy.
<10 No Yes Prior to surgical or dental procedures
give 0.5 to 1 mg IM, subcutaneously,
or IV. Check INR in 8 hours. May
repeat 0.5 mg in 24 hours if needed.
6-10 No No Omit 1 to 4 anticoagulant doses. May
consider phytonadione 0.5 to 2 mg orally,
IM, subcutaneously, or IV. Check INR
in 8 hours (12 to 48 hours if given orally).
May repeat 0.5 mg in 24 to 48 hours if
needed.
10-20 No No Phytonadione 3 to 5 mg orally, IM,
subcutaneously, or IV. Check INR in
8 hours (12 to 48 hours if given orally).
May repeat 0.5 mg in 24 hours if needed.
> 20 or Yes -- Phytonadione 10 mg IM, subcutaneously,
or IV. Check INR every 6 hours and
repeat dose every 12 hours as needed.
In acute situations, give fresh frozen
plasma or factor concentrates and
phytonadione 10 mg, to be repeated
as needed.

Usual Adult Dose for Hypoprothrombinemia -- Not Associated with Anticoagulant Therapy:

2.5 to 25 mg orally, IM, subcutaneously, or IV.
The dosage, frequency, and route of administration should be determined by the severity of the condition.
If there is no bleeding and INR < 20: 2.5 to 5 mg (up to 10 mg) may be given orally, IM, subcutaneously, or IV.
For active bleeding: 10 to 25 mg IM, subcutaneously, or IV.
When given by injection, the effects may not be apparent for up to 8 hours. Therefore, a transfusion with fresh frozen plasma or factor concentrates is recommended in serious or life-threatening situations. The INR may be checked in 8 to 12 hours following parenteral therapy or 12 to 48 hours following oral therapy, and dosage repeated if necessary.

Usual Adult Dose for Hypoprothrombinemia -- Prophylaxis:

2.5 to 10 mg orally or 1 to 10 mg IM, depending on the patient's condition. Malabsorption syndromes: 10 mg IM monthly.
Surgical correction of biliary obstruction: 5 mg IM once a day for 3 days prior to surgery.
Prolonged antibiotics in at risk patients: 10 mg orally, IM, or subcutaneously prior to or concurrent with the first antibiotic dose.
Malnourished, debilitated, or TPN patients: 1 mg IM once a week.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Hypoprothrombinemia -- Anticoagulant Induced:

Infants and children:
No bleeding, rapid reversal needed, anticoagulation to continue: 0.5 to 2 mg, intravenously or subcutaneously.
No bleeding, rapid reversal needed, patient NOT continuing anticoagulation: 2 to 5 mg, intravenously or subcutaneously.
Significant bleeding, not life-threatening: 0.5 to 2 mg intravenously or subcutaneously.
Significant bleeding and life-threatening: 5 mg intravenously.

Adolescents: 2.5 to 10 mg/dose, subcutaneously or intravenously; may repeat in 6 to 8 hours if given by subcutaneous or intravenous route; may repeat 12 to 48 hours after oral route.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Vitamin K Deficiency:

Infants and children:

2.5 to 5 mg orally once every 24 hours. Alternatively, 1 to 2 mg IV, IM or subcutaneously may be administered.

Adolescents:

2.5 to 25 mg orally once every 24 hours. Alternatively, 10 mg IV, IM or subcutaneously may be administered.

What other drugs will affect phytonadione?

Tell your doctor about all medicines you use, and those you start or stop using during your treatment with phytonadione, especially:

  • an antibiotic;

  • a blood thinner such as anisindione, heparin, warfarin, Coumadin; or

  • salicylates such as aspirin, Backache Relief Extra Strength, Novasal, Nuprin Backache Caplet, Doan's Pills Extra Strength, Pepto-Bismol, Tricosal, and others.

This list is not complete. Other drugs may interact with phytonadione, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed in this medication guide.

Where can I get more information?

  • Your pharmacist can provide more information about phytonadione.
  • Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.
  • Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2012 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 2.03. Revision Date: 2013-11-20, 10:58:08 AM.

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