Pelvic Avulsion Fractures In Adults

WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW:

A pelvic avulsion fracture occurs when a part of the pelvic (hip) bone breaks and tears away. This happens when a muscle or tendon connected to the hip bone suddenly tightens so hard it pulls off part of the bone.

INSTRUCTIONS:

Medicines:

  • Prescription pain medicine may be given. Ask your healthcare provider how to take this medicine safely.

  • Take your medicine as directed. Call your healthcare provider if you think your medicine is not helping or if you have side effects. Tell him if you are allergic to any medicine. Keep a list of the medicines, vitamins, and herbs you take. Include the amounts, and when and why you take them. Bring the list or the pill bottles to follow-up visits. Carry your medicine list with you in case of an emergency.

Follow up with your healthcare provider as directed:

Write down your questions so you remember to ask them during your visits.

Limit activity as directed:

Get plenty of rest while your fracture heals. When the pain decreases, begin normal, slow movements. Slowly start to do more each day. Rest when you feel it is needed.

Ice:

Apply ice on your hip for 15 to 20 minutes every hour or as directed. Use an ice pack, or put crushed ice in a plastic bag. Cover it with a towel. Ice helps prevent tissue damage and decreases swelling and pain.

Walking devices:

You may need to use crutches or a walker until your fracture heals. Ask for more information about how to use these walking devices if needed.

Physical therapy:

A physical therapist may teach you exercises to strengthen your hip and legs once the pain is gone.

Contact your healthcare provider if:

  • You have a fever.

  • You have new symptoms.

  • You have questions or concerns about your condition or care.

Return to the emergency department if:

  • You feel lightheaded, short of breath, and have chest pain.

  • You cough up blood.

  • Your leg feels warm, tender, and painful. It may look swollen and red.

  • You have increased swelling, pain, or redness in your hip.

  • You have trouble moving your leg or foot.

  • Your leg feels numb.

© 2014 Truven Health Analytics Inc. Information is for End User's use only and may not be sold, redistributed or otherwise used for commercial purposes. All illustrations and images included in CareNotes® are the copyrighted property of A.D.A.M., Inc. or Truven Health Analytics.

The above information is an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatments. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before following any medical regimen to see if it is safe and effective for you.

Learn more about Pelvic Avulsion Fractures In Adults (Aftercare Instructions)

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