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VERAPAMIL 120MG TABLETS

Active substance(s): VERAPAMIL HYDROCHLORIDE

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VERAPAMIL 40 mg, 80 mg
& 120 mg TABLETS
Verapamil hydrochloride

Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start taking
this medicine because it contains important
information for you.
- Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again.
- If you have any further questions, ask your doctor or
pharmacist.
- This medicine has been prescribed for you only.
Do not pass it on to others. It may harm them, even if
their signs of illness are the same as yours.
- If you get any side effects talk to your doctor or
pharmacist. This includes any possible side effects not
listed in this leaflet. See section 4.

This leaflet contains
1. What Verapamil tablets are and what they
are used for
2. What you need to know before you take
Verapamil tablets
3. How to take Verapamil tablets
4. Possible side effects
5. How to store Verapamil tablets
6. Contents of the pack and other information

1. What Verapamil tablets are and what
they are used for
Verapamil belongs to a group of medicines called
calcium channel blockers. The heart muscle and the
muscle in your blood vessel walls need calcium to contract
and tighten.
Verapamil stops calcium from getting into these muscles.
This
 relaxes your heart and blood vessels
 makes your heart pump out less blood every time it beats
 slows down your heart rate (pulse).
Verapamil can be used to:
 treat high blood pressure (hypertension). It may be
prescribed on its own or in combination with other heart
medicines
 treat and prevent chest pain (angina)
 treat and prevent heart rhythm problems such as heart
flutter (supraventricular tachycardia).
If you are not sure why you have been prescribed this
medicine then please ask your doctor.

2. What you need to know before you
take Verapamil tablets
Do not take Verapamil tablets and tell your doctor if
you:
 are allergic to Verapamil or any other ingredients in the
tablets (listed in section 6 of this leaflet). The signs of an
allergic reaction include a rash, itching or shortness of
breath
 have second or third-degree atrioventricular block or
sino-atrial block. This is a disorder where parts of your
heart may beat at the wrong time causing it not to pump
blood around the body very well
 have a heart beat disorder, such as sick sinus syndrome,
Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome or
Lown-Ganong-Levine syndrome
 have a problem where your heart beats very slowly
(severe bradycardia)
 have low blood pressure (hypotension)
 are being treated with ivabradine (for heart conditions)
 have an inherited blood disorder known as porphyria.

You will not be given this medicine if any of the above apply
to you. If you are not sure, talk to your doctor or pharmacist
before taking this medicine.
Warnings and precautions
Tell your doctor before you take this medicine if you:
 have liver or kidney problems
 have first degree atrioventricular block. This is a disorder
where parts of your heart may beat at the wrong time
causing it not to pump blood around the body very well
 have a condition where the nerve to muscle transmission
is affected e.g. myasthemia gravis, Lambert-Eaton
syndrome, advanced Duchenne muscular dystrophy.
 are pregnant or breast-feeding (see ‘Pregnancy and
breast-feeding’ section)
If you are not sure if any of the above apply to you, talk to
your doctor or pharmacist before taking this medicine.
Tests and operations while you are taking Verapamil
tablets
 your doctor may monitor your blood pressure regularly
 if you are going to be given an anaesthetic, tell the doctor
or dentist that you are taking Verapamil tablets.
Other medicines and Verapamil tablets
Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking, have recently
taken or might take any other medicines, including medicines
bought without a prescription. This is because Verapamil
tablets can affect the way some medicines work. Also some
medicines can affect the way Verapamil tablets works.
In particular, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking
any of the following:
 Medicines to treat heart failure, such as Digoxin, Digitoxin
or Eplerenone
 Medicines used to lower blood pressure and treat
abnormal heart rhythms, such as beta blockers
(e.g. Atenolol, Metoprolol or Propranolol), Alpha blockers
(e.g. Prazosin and Terazosin), Amiodarone,
Disopyramide, Flecainide or Quinidine
 Dabigatran, used to thin the blood
 Medicines containing ivabradine for the treatment of
certain heart diseases
 Simvastatin, atorvastatin or lovastatin used to lower
cholesterol levels
 Diuretics (also called ‘water pills’)
 Medicines to treat epilepsy, such as Carbamazepine,
Phenytoin, Phenobarbital or Primidone
 Midazolam used to make you sleepy
 Lithium to treat mental health problems
 Medicines to treat depression, such as Amitriptyline or
Imipramine and the herbal product St John’s Wort
 Buspirone to treat anxiety
 Theophylline to treat asthma
 Rifampicin to treat TB (tuberculosis)
 Atazanavir or Ritonavir to treat HIV (Human
Immunodeficiency Virus)
 Clarithromycin, Erythromycin or Telithromycin to treat
bacterial infections
 Cimetidine to treat stomach ulcers
 Ciclosporin, Everolimus, Sirolimus or Tacrolimus used to
stop the rejection of organs after transplants
 Glibenclamide, used to treat certain types of diabetes
 Aspirin, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory painkiller
(NSAID) used to relieve pain and reduce fever
 Almotriptan, used to treat migraine
 Injected Dantrolene to treat severe muscle spasms
 Muscle relaxants, such as Atracurium or Suxamethonium
 Darifenacin to treat urinary problems
 Dutasteride to treat an enlarged prostate gland.
 Doxorubicin, an anti-cancer medicine
 Colchicine or suplfinpyrazone used to treat gout
If you go into hospital or have treatment for other conditions,
tell the doctor you are taking Verapamil tablets

Do not take this medicine if any of the above apply to you. If
you are not sure, talk to your doctor or pharmacist before
taking this medicine.

Verapamil tablets with food and drink
 do not drink grapefruit juice whilst taking Verapamil
tablets. This is because grapefruit juice may change the
blood levels of your medicine
 you should monitor the amount of alcohol you drink
whilst taking Verapamil tablets. This is because
Verapamil can affect the way the body gets rid of alcohol.
This means that you may not have to drink as much for
your blood alcohol levels to be above the legal limit to
drive. It will also take you longer to sober up.

You will not be given Verapamil tablets if you:
 have a sudden and rapid fall in blood pressure
(cardiogenic shock)
 have heart failure that is not being treated
 have a sudden heart attack, particularly if you have a
slow heart beat, low blood pressure or a type of heart
failure called ‘left ventricular failure’.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding
Talk to your doctor before taking this medicine if you are
pregnant, think you might be pregnant, planning to have a
baby or are breast-feeding.
 you must only take this medicine in the first 3 months of
pregnancy (1st trimester) if your doctor thinks it is
essential

Pharmacode

PACKAGE LEAFLET: INFORMATION FOR THE USER

 numbness or tingling
 muscle or joint pain

Driving and using machines
When starting Verapamil tablets, you may find that your
ability to drive a car or use machinery is impaired. You should
take care when driving or using machines until you know how
you react to this medicine.

The most common side effect is constipation. Other side
effects include;
 muscle weakness
 tremor or movement disorders
 breast development in older men or breasts start to
produce milk (males and females). These effects are rare
and are resolved upon stopping taking the tablets
 difficulty in getting an erection
 flushing of your face
 skin rash or itching
 hair loss
 headaches, feeling dizzy or tired
 tinnitus (ringing or buzzing in the ears)
 vertigo
 abdominal pain or discomfort
 feeling sick (nausea) or being sick (vomiting)
 swollen and overgrown gums

Verapamil tablets contains
 lactose (a type of sugar). If your doctor has told you that
you cannot tolerate some sugars, see your doctor before
taking this medicine.
 sunset yellow (E110), which may cause allergic
reactions.

3. How to take Verapamil tablets
Always take Verapamil tablets exactly as your doctor or
pharmacist has told you. Check with your doctor or
pharmacist if you are not sure. Swallow this medicine with
a glass of water
Adults
The recommended dose is:
For high blood pressure: 120 mg twice a day. Your doctor
may increase this to a maximum of 160 mg two or three
times a day.
For angina: 120 mg three times a day. Your doctor may
lower this dose.
For heart rhythm disorders: 40 mg to 120 mg three times a
day.
Elderly
The dose will be the same as that for adults. If you have a
liver or kidney problem, your doctor may lower your dose.
Children
The doctor will decide if this medicine is suitable for your
child, depending on your child’s condition and age.
The recommended dose for children is:
Up to 2 years of age: 20 mg two or three times a day.
2 years of age and above: 40 mg to 120 mg two or three
times a day.
If you take more Verapamil tablets than you should
Talk to a doctor or go to a hospital straight away. Take the
medicine pack with you so the doctor knows what you have
taken.
If you forget to take Verapamil tablets
Take your tablets as soon as you remember. However, if it is
nearly time for the next dose, skip the missed dose. Do not
take a double dose (two doses at the same time) to make up
for a forgotten dose.
If you stop taking Verapamil tablets
Do not stop taking this medicine without talking to your doctor
first. If you stop taking this medicine it may make your
condition worse.
If you have any further questions on the use of this medicine,
ask your doctor or pharmacist.

4. Possible side effects
Like all medicines, Verapamil tablets can cause side effects,
although not everybody gets them.
If you have any of the following side effects, STOP
TAKING this medicine and see a doctor or go to a
hospital straight away:
 yellowing of the skin or eyes, a fever or tenderness
around the middle. These are signs that your liver may
not be functioning as well as usual.
 an allergic reaction which may cause an itchy skin rash,
flaking skin, red and raised lumps (hives), blistering of
your skin, mouth, eyes or genitals, sudden wheezing,
fluttering or tightness of your chest or collapse, swelling
of your face, lips, tongue or throat or difficulty in breathing
or swallowing
 heart problems such as low blood pressure (hypotension),
slow heart beats, unusual heart beats, heart attack or
heart failure. This is more likely if you are taking high
doses or you already have damage to your heart
 swelling of the limbs
If you get any of the following side effects, see your
doctor as soon as possible:
 swelling of your blood vessels which may show as pain in
the fingers and toes

This medicine may also cause an increase in levels of a
hormone called prolactin. This will only be detected through
tests performed by your doctor.
Reporting of side effects
If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.
This includes any possible side effects not listed in this
leaflet. You can also report side effects directly via the Yellow
Card Scheme at www.mhra.gov.uk/yellowcard.

5. How to store Verapamil tablets
Keep this medicine out of the sight and reach of
children.
Do not store above 25°C. Store in the original package to
protect from light or store in the original container and keep
the container tightly closed.
Do not use this medicine after the expiry date, which is stated
on the package or container. The expiry date refers to the
last day of that month.
Do not throw away any medicines via wastewater or
household waste. Ask your pharmacist how to throw away
medicines you no longer use. These measures will help to
protect the environment.

6. Contents of the pack and other
information
What Verapamil tablets contain
The active substance (the ingredient that makes the tablets
work) is verapamil hydrochloride.
The other ingredients in the tablets are maize starch, lactose,
gelatin, magnesium stearate, colloidal anhydrous silica, talc,
titanium dioxide (E171), quinoline yellow (E104), sunset
yellow (E110), hydroxypropyl cellulose, hydroxypropyl
methylcellulose, ethylcellulose and diethyl phthalate.
What Verapamil tablets look like and contents of the
pack
Verapamil tablets are round, pale yellow, film coated tablets
with a marking engraved on one side. The 40 mg tablets are
engraved with MP68, the 80 mg tablets are engraved with
MP69 and the 120 mg tablets are engraved with MP70.
Al three strengths of Verapamil Tablets come in blister packs
of 28 and 84 tablets and in containers of 100 and 500 tablets.
Not all pack sizes may be marketed.
Marketing Authorisation Holder
Metwest Pharmaceuticals Limited,
15 Runnelfield, Harrow on the Hill,
Middlesex HA1 3NY
Manufacturer
DDSA Pharmaceuticals Limited,
310 Old Brompton Road,
London SW5 9JQ
For more information about this product, please contact the
Marketing Authorisation Holder.
This leaflet was last revised in 03/2016

M0068-0069-0070/O/PIL/M1

Pharmacode

 you must only take this medicine if you are
breast-feeding if your doctor thinks it is necessary.

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Source: Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency

Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided here is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. This information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. If you have questions about the substances you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

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