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STANNOUS AGENT 4 MILLIGRAMS/6.8 MILLIGRAMS KIT FOR RADIOPHARMACEUTICAL PREPARATION

Active substance(s): SODIUM MEDRONATE / STANNOUS FLUORIDE

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PACKAGE LEAFLET: INFORMATION FOR THE USER
Stannous Agent 4 milligrams/6.8 milligrams kit for radiopharmaceutical preparation
(called Stannous Agent in this leaflet)
Stannous fluoride/methylene diphosphonic acid, as sodium salt
Read all of this leaflet carefully before you are given Stannous Agent.




Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again.
If you have any further questions, ask your doctor.
If any of the side effects gets serious, or if you notice any side effects not listed in this
leaflet, please tell your doctor or nurse.

In this leaflet:
1. What Stannous Agent is and what it is used for
2. Before you are given Stannous Agent
3. How Stannous Agent is given
4. Possible side effects
5. How to store Stannous Agent
6. Further information
1. What Stannous Agent is and what it is used for
This medicine is for diagnostic use
only. It is used only to help identify illness.
Stannous Agent is a ‘radiopharmaceutical’ medicine. It is given before a scan and helps a
special camera see inside a part of your body.
• It contains active ingredients called ‘stannous fluoride’ and ‘methylene diphosphonic acid,
as sodium salt’. These are taken with another ingredient called ‘technetium’.
• Once injected it can be seen from outside your body by a special camera used in the scan.
• The scan can help your doctor see how well your heart is working and how well the blood
is flowing to organs in your body.
• Some other people are given this medicine to find bleeding in the gut.
Your doctor or nurse will explain which part of your body will be scanned.
2. Before you are given Stannous Agent
You should not be given Stannous Agent:
• If you are allergic (hypersensitive) to the active ingredients. (Listed in Section 6).
Do not have Stannous Agent if the above applies to you. If you are not sure talk to your
doctor or nurse.
Take special care with Stannous Agent
Check with your doctor or nurse before having Stannous Agent:
• If you are pregnant or think you might be pregnant.
• If you are on a low sodium diet.

Taking other medicines
Please tell your doctor or nurse if you are taking or have recently taken any other medicines,
including medicines obtained without a prescription. This includes herbal medicines. This is
because some medicines can affect the way Stannous Agent works.
Before your scan tell your doctor or nurse if you are taking any of the types of medicine
below.
This is because they may affect the results of your scan:
• Beta blockers, such as propanolol (used to treat conditions such as high blood pressure,
heart disease, anxiety and tremor).
• Calcium channel blockers, such as verapamil or nifedipine (used to treat high blood
pressure and angina).
• Nitrates, such as glyceryl trinitrate (used to treat angina).
• Anthracycline antibiotics such as daunorubicin and doxorubicin (used in chemotherapy).
• Heparin (used to prevent clotting of the blood).
• Prazosin (used to lower high blood pressure or to treat symptoms of an enlarged prostate
gland).
• Methyldopa (used for low blood pressure).
• Hydralazin (used to treat high blood pressure).
• Quinidine (used for an irregular heart beat).
• Medicines containing or similar to digitalis (for example, digoxin, used to treat an
irregular heartbeat).
• Medicines given in hospital for x-rays or scans (iodinated contrast media).
• Aluminium (aluminium salts are contained in some medicines for indigestion and
heartburn; aluminium salts may also be used in some illnesses of the kidney).
• Tin overload.
If you are not sure if any of the above apply to you, talk to your doctor or nurse before having
Stannous Agent,
Your scan may be affected if you are using a teflon ‘catheter’ (used to allow the flow of fluids
or expand a passageway in the body). Talk to your doctor or nurse if this applies to you.
Pregnancy and breast-feeding
You must tell your doctor if you are pregnant or think you may be pregnant. Your doctor will
only use this product if it is considered that the benefit outweighs the risk.
Do not breast-feed if you are given Stannous Agent. This is because small amounts of
‘radioactivity’ may pass into the mother’s milk. If you are breast-feeding, your doctor may
wait until you have finished breast-feeding before using Stannous Agent. If it is not possible
to wait your doctor will ask you to:
• stop breast-feeding for 12 hours, and
• use formula feed for your child, and
• express (remove) breast milk and throw away the milk.
Your doctor will let you know when you can start breast-feeding again.
Driving and using machines
Ask your doctor if you can drive or use machines after you have been given Stannous Agent.
Important information about Stannous Agent

When Stannous Agent is used you are exposed to radioactivity.
• Your doctor will always consider the possible risks and benefits before you are given the
medicine.
Ask your doctor if you have any questions.
3. How Stannous Agent is given
Stannous Agent will be given to you by a specially
trained and qualified person.
• Stannous Agent will always be used in a hospital or clinic.
• They will tell you anything you need to know for its safe use.
Your doctor will decide on the dose that is best for you.
The usual dose:
• Two injections.
The first injection will contain Stannous Agent. This will be followed, 20 to 40 minutes later,
by a second injection containing the ingredient technetium. Alternatively your doctor may
decide to take a sample of your blood 15 to 30 minutes after the first injection. Your blood
sample will be mixed with technetium then given to you as an injection.
4. Possible side effects
Like all medicines, Stannous Agent can cause side effects,
although not everybody gets them.
Allergic reactions
If you have an allergic reaction when you are in hospital or a clinical having the scan, tell the
doctor or nurse straight away. The signs include:
• skin rash or itching or flushing
• swelling of the face
• difficulty in breathing.
If any of the side effects above happen after you leave the hospital or clinic, go straight to the
casualty department of your nearest hospital.
Other side effects
• headache
• dizziness (due to fall in blood pressure)
• nausea (feeling sick)
• vomiting (being sick)
• malaise (feeling of becoming ill)
• swelling of the hands and feet (extremities)
• pain in joints.
If any of the side effects gets serious, or if you notice any side effects not listed in this leaflet,
please tell your doctor or nurse.
5. How to store Stannous Agent
Stannous Agent is kept out of the reach and sight of
children.

The product label includes the correct storage conditions and the expiry date for the batch.
Hospital staff will ensure that the product is stored and disposed of correctly and not used
after the expiry date stated on the label.
6. Further information



What Stannous Agent contains
The active ingredients are stannous fluoride and methylene diphosphonic acid, as sodium
salt. Each vial of Stannous Agent contains 4 milligrams stannous fluoride and
6.8 milligrams methylene diphosphonic acid, as sodium salt.
There are no other ingredients in Stannous Agent.

What Stannous Agent looks like and contents of the pack
Stannous Agent is supplied as a kit for radiopharmaceutical preparation. The kit contains five
vials. Each vial contains 4 milligrams of stannous fluoride and 6.8 milligrams of sodium
medronate.
Marketing Authorisation Holder
Mediam
85, rue Nelson Mandela
59120 Loos
France
Manufacturer
GE Healthcare Limited
Amersham Place
Little Chalfont
Buckinghamshire HP7 9NA
United Kingdom
This leaflet was last approved in 12/2011.
Marketing Authorisations
UK: PL 22879/0003
Ireland: PA 1229/002/001
PATIENT
INFORMATION

Stannous Agent
4 milligrams/6.8 milligrams
kit for radiopharmaceutical
preparation
Stannous fluoride/methylene
diphosphonic acid, as
sodium salt

N106K

PACKAGE LEAFLET: INFORMATION FOR HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL
1 NAME OF THE MEDICINAL PRODUCT
Stannous Agent 4 milligrams/6.8 milligrams kit for radiopharmaceutical preparation.
2 QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE COMPOSITION
Stannous fluoride, 4.0 mg/vial
Sodium medronate [methylene diphosphonic acid also known as medronic acid (MDP)
sodium salt], 6.8 mg/vial (equivalent to 5.4 mg medronic acid/vial).
Stannous Agent is reconstituted with sodium chloride injection (not included in this kit) for
the labelling of red blood cells with technetium-99m.
The product before reconstitution contains:
Sodium: 1.42 mg/vial. This needs to be taken into consideration for patients on a controlled
sodium diet.
Technetium-99m decays with the emission of gamma radiation with an energy of 140 keV
and a half-life of 6 hours to technetium-99 which can be regarded as quasi-stable.
3 PHARMACEUTICAL FORM
Kit for radiopharmaceutical preparation.
White to off-white freeze dried powder.
4 CLINICAL PARTICULARS
4.1 Therapeutic indications
This medicinal product is for diagnostic use only.
In vivo or in vivo/in vitro red blood cell labelling for blood pool scintigraphy. Major
indications are:





angiocardioscintigraphy for:
• evaluation of ventricular ejection fraction
• evaluation of global and regional cardiac wall motion
• myocardial phase imaging
organ perfusion and vascular abnormalities imaging
diagnosis and localisation of occult gastro-intestinal bleeding

4.2 Posology and method of administration
Administration is by intravenous injection.
Red blood cell (RBC) labelling methods
The stannous MDP complex (non-radioactive substance) is first reconstituted with isotonic
sodium chloride solution for injection.
In vivo method
Injection of the stannous MDP complex and consecutive injection of sodium [99mTc]
pertechnetate 20-40minutes later.

Modified in vivo method (in vivo/in vitro)
Injection of the reconstituted solution of the stannous MDP complex for in vivo “stannous
loading” of RBC.
In vitro RBC labelling with sodium [99mTc] pertechnetate after withdrawal of a blood sample.
Reinjection of the labelled red blood cells.
Following reconstitution of the lyophilised product, the recommended volume of stannous
MDP complex to be administered to adults and the elderly is 0.03 ml/kg body weight. In
children a dose calculated with reference to the body weight of the child should be
administered.
Subsequent to the administration of the stannous-MDP complex, either Sodium Pertechnetate
(99mTc) Injection (in vivo method) or technetium-99m labelled red blood cells (in vivo/in vitro
method) is given at the level of 740-925 MBq in adults and the elderly.
The activity for children may be calculated from the recommended range of adult activity and
adjusted according to body weight or surface area. However, the Paediatric Task Group of
EANM recommends calculation of the administered activity from the body weight according
to the following table.
3kg
4kg
6kg
8kg
10kg
12kg
14kg
16kg
18kg
20kg

= 0.10
= 0.14
= 0.19
= 0.23
= 0.27
= 0.32
= 0.36
= 0.40
= 0.44
= 0.46

Fraction of adult dose
22kg = 0.50
42kg
= 0.78
24kg = 0.53
44kg
= 0.80
26kg = 0.56
46kg
= 0.82
28kg = 0.58
48kg
= 0.85
30kg = 0.62
50kg
= 0.88
32kg = 0.65
52-54kg = 0.90
34kg = 0.68
56-58kg = 0.92
36kg = 0.71
60-62kg = 0.96
38kg = 0.73
64-66kg = 0.98
40kg = 0.76
68kg
= 0.99

(Paediatric Task Group, European Association of Nuclear Medicine)
In very young children (up to 1 year) a minimum dose of 80 MBq is necessary in order to
obtain images of sufficient quality.
Because of the long lasting fixation of stannous salts on red blood cells, it is recommended
not to repeat the procedure within 3 months.
4.3 Contraindications
Hypersensitivity to the active substance(s) or to any of the excipients.
4.4 Special warnings and precautions for use
It is recommended that in vivo technetium-99m RBC labelling be performed prior to
administration of iodinated contrast media.
Otherwise, labelling efficiency will be adversely affected.
In infants and children, a particularly careful assessment must be made of the diagnostic
value, necessity for and risks of the procedure.

4.5 Interaction with other medicinal products and other forms of interaction
Reduction in red blood cell labelling yield has been reported with heparin, tin overload,
aluminium, prazosin, methyldopa, hydralazin, digitalic related compounds, quinidine,
β-adrenergic blockers (e.g. propanolol) calcium channel blockers (e.g. verapamil, nifedipine),
nitrates (e.g. nitroglycerin), anthracycline antibiotic, iodinated contrast agents and Teflon
catheter (the Sn++ can react with the catheter).
4.6 Pregnancy and lactation
When it is necessary to administer radioactive medicinal products to women of childbearing
potential, information should always be sought about pregnancy. Any woman who has missed
a period should be assumed to be pregnant until proven otherwise. Where uncertainty exists it
is important that radiation exposure should be the minimum consistent with achieving the
desired clinical information. Alternative techniques which do not involve ionising radiation
should be considered.
Radionuclide procedures carried out on pregnant women also involve radiation doses to the
foetus. Only imperative investigations should be carried out during pregnancy, when the
likely benefit exceeds the risk incurred by the mother and the foetus. Administration of
925 MBq technetium-99m labelled RBCs results in an absorbed dose to the uterus of
4.3 mGy. Doses above 0.5 mGy should be regarded as a potential risk to the foetus.
Before administering a radioactive medicinal product to a mother who is breast feeding,
consideration should be given as to whether the investigation could be reasonably delayed
until the mother has ceased breast feeding and as to whether the most appropriate choice of
radiopharmaceutical has been made. If administration is considered necessary, breast feeding
should be interrupted and the expressed feeds discarded. Breast feeding can be restarted about
12 hours post injection or when the level of radioactivity in milk will not result in a radiation
dose greater than 1mSv to the child.
4.7 Effects on ability to drive and use machines
No studies on the effects on the ability to drive and use machines have been performed.
4.8 Undesirable effects
For each patient, exposure to ionising radiation must be justifiable on the basis of likely
benefit. The activity administered must be such that the resulting radiation dose is as low as
reasonably achievable bearing in mind the need to obtain the intended diagnostic result.
Exposure to ionising radiation is linked with cancer induction and a potential for development
of hereditary defects. For diagnostic nuclear medicine investigations the current evidence
suggests that these adverse effects will occur with low frequency because of the low radiation
doses incurred.
For most diagnostic investigations using a nuclear medicine procedure effective dose is less
than 20 mSv. Higher doses may be justified in some clinical circumstances.
Occasionally, hypersensitivity reactions may occur following intravenous administration of
medronate. Cases of local rash or generalised rash with itching and dermal irritation have
been reported. Onset of the reaction is commonly several hours post injection and it may last
up to 48 hours. Treatment with a non-sedative histamine H1 antagonist is helpful.
Other reactions reported include a fall in blood pressure and hypotensive symptoms, nausea,
vomiting, cutaneous vasodilatation, headache, malaise, oedema of the extremities and
arthralgia.

Isolated cases of allergic or vasovagal reactions have been reported after administration of red
blood cells labelled with technetium-99m but no specific details have been formally recorded.
4.9 Overdose
In the event of the accidental administration of an overdose of the radiopharmaceutical very
little supportive treatment can be undertaken since its elimination is entirely dependant on the
normal haemolytic process.
Forced diuresis and frequent bladder voiding are recommended in the case of overdosage with
sodium [99mTc] pertechnetate
5 PHARMACOLOGICAL PROPERTIES
5.1 Pharmacodynamic properties
Pharmacotherapeutic group: diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals, cardiovascular system,
technetium (99mTc) stannous agent labelled cells, ATC code: V09GA06.
Erythrocytes labelled with a radioisotope are not expected to have any pharmacological
activity. The labelling is achieved by an initial injection of a stannous salt to “load” the
erythrocytes with a reducing agent so that the subsequent administration of sodium [99mTc]
pertechnetate will result in accumulation of technetium-99m bound to the β-chains of globin
in the cells. None of these processes involves sufficient chemical material to produce any
pharmacodynamic effects.
5.2 Pharmacokinetic properties
Intravenous injection of stannous salts effects a “stannous loading” of erythrocytes. When
sodium [99mTc] pertechnetate is subsequently injected there is an enhanced accumulation and
retention of sodium [99mTc] pertechnetate in the choroid plexus and red blood cells. Under
normal circumstances intravenously injected pertechnetate freely diffuses in and out of
erythrocytes. However, when they have been preloaded with stannous ion the sodium [99mTc]
pertechnetate is reduced within the cells and becomes bound the β-chains of the globin. The
mechanisms by which sodium [99mTc] pertechnetate becomes attached to tin primed red blood
cells are not clearly understood. However, reducing surface charge decreases the efficiency of
labelling with pertechnetate by up to 20%. Moreover 20% of injected pertechnetate enters the
red cells and binds with a beta chain of globin. The remaining 70-80% of pertechnetate is
believed to be in a more intracellular pool such as the cytoplasm or on the red cell membrane.
The stannous MDP complex results in a labelling efficiency of 95% five minutes after
injection of sodium [99mTc] pertechnetate. Unbound sodium [99mTc] pertechnetate is cleared
by the kidneys and the amount of radioactivity in the plasma constitutes less than 5% of
intravascular radioactivity. The technetium-99m concentration of red cells increases during
the first 10-15 minutes after injection and then remains level for several hours. The
percentage of injected pertechnetate appearing in the urine during the first two hours of
injection amounts to about 5%
5.3 Preclinical safety data
There are no preclinical safety data specific to technetium labelled erythrocytes. The
technetium bound to erythrocyte protein is cleared very slowly, presumably following the
cellular life-span.
The toxicity of pertechnetate ion and stannous salts has been studied and reported in the
literature. General toxic effects are only observed at relatively high parenteral doses of all the
salts involved, giving a safety margin based on mg/kg of at least 150.

Repeated administration of very high doses of diphosphonates can cause demineralization
disorders.
Stannous salts are reported to have a week potential for mutagenicity. There are no studies
describing possible effects on reproduction or tumour incidence.
6 PHARMACEUTICAL PARTICULARS,
6.1 List of excipients
Not applicable.
6.2 Incompatibilities
This medicinal product must not be mixed with other medicinal products except those
mentioned in section 12.
6.3 Shelf life
78 weeks from the date of manufacture.
The reconstituted product should be stored below 25°C. Do not freeze.
The reconstituted injection should be used within 2 hours of removing the first patient dose
and within 6 hours of preparation.
6.4 Special precautions for storage
Store below 25°C.
Storage should be in accordance with national regulations for radioactive material.
For storage conditions of the reconstituted medicinal product, see section 6.3.
6.5 Nature and contents of container
10 ml, Type 1, Ph.Eur., clear, colourless, borosilicate glass vial sealed with a chlorobutyl
rubber closure and oversealed with an aluminium overseal with a blue flip-off cap.
6.6 Special precautions for disposal and other handling
Normal safety precautions for handling radioactive materials should be observed. After use,
all materials associated with the preparation and administration of radiopharmaceuticals,
including any unused product and its container, should be decontaminated or treated as
radioactive waste and disposed of in accordance with the conditions specified by the local
competent authority. Contaminated material must be disposed of as radioactive waste via an
authorised route.
7 MARKETING AUTHORISATION HOLDER
Mediam
85, rue Nelson Mandela
59120 Loos
France
8 MARKETING AUTHORISATION NUMBER
UK: PL 22879/0003
Ireland: PA 1229/002/001
Denmark: DK R. 1134
Finland: 11214
Norway: MTnr. 8316
Sweden: 80075

9 DATE OF FIRST AUTHORISATION/RENEWAL OF THE AUTHORISATION
Date of first authorisation Date of last renewal
UK
12 April 1999
09 April 2005
Ireland 22 January 1999
25 January 2005
10 DATE OF REVISION OF THE TEXT
12/2011
11 DOSIMETRY
The table below shows the radiation doses absorbed by a patient weighing 70 kg after
intravenous injection of technetium 99m labelled erythrocytes as calculated according to the
Publication 80 of the ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection, Radiation
Dose to Patients from Radiopharmaceuticals, Pergamon Press 1998).

Organ
Adrenals
Bladder
Bone surfaces
Brain
Breast
Gall Bladder
GI-tract
Stomach
SI
Colon
(ULI wall
(LLI wall
Heart
Kidneys
Liver
Lungs
Muscles
Oesophagus
Ovaries
Pancreas
Red marrow
Skin
Spleen
Testes
Thymus
Thyroid
Uterus
Remaining organs
Effective Dose
(mSv/MBq)

Absorbed dose
per unit activity administered (mGy/MBq)
Adult
15 year
10 year
5 year
1 year
9.9E-03
1.2E-02
2.0E-02
3.0E-02
5.6E-02
8.5E-03
1.1E-02
1.4E-02
1.7E-02
3.1E-02
7.4E-03
1.2E-02
1.9E-02
3.6E-02
7.4E-02
3.6E-03
4.6E-03
7.5E-03
1.2E-02
2.2E-02
3.5E-03
4.1E-03
7.0E-03
1.1E-02
1.9E-02
6.5E-03
8.1E-03
1.3E-02
2.0E-02
3.0E-02
4.6E-03
3.9E-03
3.7E-03
4.0E-03
3.4E-03
2.3E-02
1.8E-02
1.3E-02
1.8E-02
3.3E-03
6.1E-03
3.7E-03
6.6E-03
6.1E-03
2.0E-03
1.4E-02
2.3E-03
6.1E-03
5.7E-03
3.9E-03
3.5E-03

5.9E-03
4.9E-03
4.8E-03
5.1E-03
4.4E-03
2.9E-02
2.2E-02
1.7E-02
2.2E-02
4.0E-03
7.0E-03
4.8E-03
8.1E-03
7.6E-03
2.4E-03
1.7E-02
3.0E-03
7.0E-03
7.1E-03
4.9E-03
4.5E-03

9.7E-03
7.8E-03
7.5E-03
8.0E-03
6.9E-03
4.3E-02
3.6E-02
2.6E-02
3.5E-02
6.1E-03
9.8E-03
7.0E-03
1.3E-02
1.2E-02
3.8E-03
2.7E-02
4.4E-03
9.8E-03
1.2E-02
7.4E-03
7.3E-03

1.4E-02
1.2E-02
1.2E-02
1.3E-02
1.0E-02
6.6E-02
5.7E-02
4.0E-02
5.6E-02
9.4E-03
1.5E-02
1.1E-02
1.9E-02
2.0E-02
6.2E-03
4.3E-02
6.9E-03
1.5E-02
1.9E-02
1.1E-02
1.3E-02

2.5E-02
2.1E-02
2.0E-02
2.2E-02)
1.8E-02)
1.1E-01
1.1E-01
7.2E-02
1.1E-01
1.7E-02
2.3E-02
1.9E-02
3.3E-02
3.7E-02
1.2E-02
8.1E-02
1.3E-02
2.3E-02
3.6E-02
1.9E-02
2.3E-02

7.0E-03

8.9E-03

1.4E-02

2.1E-02

3.9E-02

For this product the effective dose resulting from an administered dose of 925 MBq is
6.5 mSv (per 70 kg individual).
For an administered activity of 925 MBq the typical radiation dose to the critical organ (heart)
is 21 mGy.
12 INSTRUCTIONS FOR PREPARATION OF RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS
This radiopharmaceutical may be received, used and administered only by authorised persons
in hospitals. Its receipt, storage, use, transfer and disposal are subject to the regulations and
the appropriate licences of the local competent official organisations (see section 6.6).
The administration of radiopharmaceuticals creates risks for other persons from external
radiation or contamination from spills of urine, vomiting, etc. Radiation protection
precautions in accordance with national regulations must therefore be taken.
Normal safety precautions for the handling of radioactivity materials should be observed in
addition to the use of aseptic technique to maintain sterility of the vial contents.
Method of preparation of the final dosage form for injection
Use aseptic technique throughout.
(1) Swab the vial closure with the sanitizing swab provided.
(2) Using a 10 ml syringe, inject 6.0 ml sterile, pyrogen-free isotonic saline (containing no
preservatives) into one of the vials. Before removing the syringe needle, withdraw an
equivalent volume of gas from the space above the solution to normalize the pressure in the
vial. Shake the vial to ensure complete dissolution of the powder. The preparation is now
ready for intravenous injection. Do not introduce air into the vial when removing a patient
dose. The reconstituted injection should be used within 2 hours of removing the first patient
dose and in any case within 6 hours of reconstitution.
Notes:
(a)

Individual patient doses taken from the vial immediately after reconstitution may be
stored aseptically in a syringe with a capped needle or blanking tip for periods of up to
6 hours.

(b)

The vial should not be reconstituted with eluate from a technetium generator.

Procedure for the in vitro labelling of “stannous loaded” red blood cells (modified in vivo
method)
This method facilitates injection of red cells free from 99mTc pertechnetate ion leading to
increased target to background ratios. This method also allows labelled red cells to be injected
as a bolus for first pass cardiac studies.
Use aseptic technique throughout.
(1) Between 15 and 30 minutes after administration of the reconstituted injection remove 3 to
5ml of patient’s blood into heparinised syringe. (A suggested protocol for heparinising the
syringe is as follows: wet the syringe with a few drops of heparin (5000 U/ml) and then rinse
the syringe with heparin (10 U/ml) in a solution of 0.9% sodium chloride.)
(2) Incubate 3ml of this heparinised blood with 1.11 - 1.48 GBq (30-40 mCi) sterile eluate
from a technetium-99m generator (Sodium Pertechnetate (99mTc) Injection) for 10 minutes at
37°C (or 20 minutes at room temperature) in a closed sterile centrifuge tube.

(3) After incubation add 5 ml saline (sodium chloride injection) and centrifuge for 10 minutes
at 500g.
(4) Remove the supernatant and measure the activity as a quality control for sodium [99mTc]
pertechnetate not bound to red cells.
(5) Resuspend the red cells in 0.9% sodium chloride and reinject the patient with 1-1.5 ml
blood containing the required activity of technetium-99m.
Imaging is normally commenced a few minutes after injection of the technetium-99m labelled
red cells. If first pass cardiac studies are to be performed the technetium is injected as a bolus
immediately prior to scintigraphy.
Determination of radiolabelling efficiency
If required, the radiolabelling efficiency of the radiolabelling procedure may be determined
by comparing the activity level in the labelled cell suspension with that in the radiolabelling
supernatant
% labelling efficiency = Ac x 100
Ac+ As
where Ac is the activity in the labelled cell suspension
As is the activity remaining in the radiolabelling supernatant

13 OTHER INFORMATION
Manufacturer
GE Healthcare Limited
Amersham Place
Little Chalfont
Buckinghamshire HP7 9NA
United Kingdom
HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL
INFORMATION

Stannous Agent
4 milligrams/6.8 milligrams
kit for radiopharmaceutical
preparation
Stannous fluoride/methylene
diphosphonic acid, as
sodium salt

N106

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Source: Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency

Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided here is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. This information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. If you have questions about the substances you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

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